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Ec09-130 2009 Guide For Weed Management, Mark L. Bernards, Roch E. Gaussoin, Robert N. Klein, Stevan Z. Knezevic, Drew J. Lyon, Lowell D. Sandell, Robert G. Wilson Jr., Patrick J. Shea, Clyde Ogg Jan 2009

Ec09-130 2009 Guide For Weed Management, Mark L. Bernards, Roch E. Gaussoin, Robert N. Klein, Stevan Z. Knezevic, Drew J. Lyon, Lowell D. Sandell, Robert G. Wilson Jr., Patrick J. Shea, Clyde Ogg

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The 2009 Guide for Weed Management in Nebraska is a valuable tool for anyone with responsibility for controlling weeds in crop, pasture, range, turf or aquatic environments in Nebraska. Our goal is to provide a comprehensive publication that will enable the user to make sound weed control decisions based on unbiased, research-based information, and to carry out weed control activities in a safe and responsible manner.

This publication deals principally with herbicides as an aid for crop production. The suggestions for use are based on research at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln Research and Extension Centers and elsewhere.


G06-1033 It's Snack Time, Linda S. Boeckner, Karen Schledewitz Jan 2006

G06-1033 It's Snack Time, Linda S. Boeckner, Karen Schledewitz

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Snacks are the foods we eat outside of a more structured meal setting. Snacking can be a part of a healthy eating plan or it can be a harmful habit. The difference between harmful and healthy snacking is up to you. Think about what, when, how often and how much you eat snacks.

In this NebGuide, learn how snacks affect your overall diet and how to select healthful snacks that meet your dietary needs.


Ec06-155 Nutrient Management For Agronomic Crops In Nebraska, Richard B. Ferguson Jan 2006

Ec06-155 Nutrient Management For Agronomic Crops In Nebraska, Richard B. Ferguson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Nebraska is blessed with fertile soil and vast supplies of groundwater which combine to create an environment well-suited to the production of corn, wheat, grain sorghum, alfalfa, edible beans, and other agronomic crops used for human or animal consumption.

This manual is a guide to nutrient use from all sources for the production of Nebraska's major agronomic crops: corn, winter wheat, grain sorghum, oats, alfalfa, dry edible beans, soybean, sugar beets, popcorn, sunflower, millet, potatoes, and cool and warm season grasses for hay and pasture. Part I of the manual contains information focusing on basic principles of soil fertility ...


Ec06-219 2006 Nebraska Swine Report, Duane Reese Jan 2006

Ec06-219 2006 Nebraska Swine Report, Duane Reese

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The 2006 Nebraska Swine Report was prepared by the staff in Animal Science and cooperating Departments for use in Extension, Teaching and Research programs. This publications deals with research on swine reproduction, breeding, health, nutrition, economics, and housing.


Nf05-640 Early Literacy Checklist — Classroom, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain Jan 2005

Nf05-640 Early Literacy Checklist — Classroom, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This checklist represents the kinds of language and literacy development practices often seen in high-quality early childhood environments. The checklist encompasses all children birth to age 5 and is inclusive of the needs of children with disabilities and English language learners.


Ec05-130 Guide For Weed Management In Nebraska, Roch E. Gaussoin, Brady F. Kappler, Robert N. Klein, Stevan Z. Knezevic, Drew J. Lyon, Alex Martin, Fred Roeth, Gail A. Wicks, Robert G. Wilson, Robert A. Masters, Patrick J. Shea, Larry D. Schulze Jan 2005

Ec05-130 Guide For Weed Management In Nebraska, Roch E. Gaussoin, Brady F. Kappler, Robert N. Klein, Stevan Z. Knezevic, Drew J. Lyon, Alex Martin, Fred Roeth, Gail A. Wicks, Robert G. Wilson, Robert A. Masters, Patrick J. Shea, Larry D. Schulze

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

One of the major thrusts of all University of Nebraska weed science faculty is the Guide for Weed Management in Nebraska. This guide is not just the work of one or two people, rather it is a joint effort of all the authors to produce a comprehensive, information-packed resource. Each weed science faculty member is responsible for particular sections of the guide. The process of reviewing the current content, checking labels and research data and updating the content can be an extensive process. Each year new herbicide active ingredients and trade names are introduced and figuring out what a herbicide ...


Nf05-653 Pyemotes Itch Mites, James A. Kalisch, David L. Keith, Alberto R. Broce Jan 2005

Nf05-653 Pyemotes Itch Mites, James A. Kalisch, David L. Keith, Alberto R. Broce

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Two North American Species of itch mites — the straw itch mite and the "oak leaf gall mite" (Family Pyemotidae) — are found in Nebraska and Kansas. The straw itch mite was known in the early 1900s as a nuisance pest after farm workers handled small grains. Wheat, oats, and barley were often infested with insects on which the itch mites fed, allowing them to reach large numbers by harvest. The oak leaf gall mite recently discovered in galls on pin oaks in Lincoln, Neb., and Manhattan, Kan., is believed to be a relatively recent introduction to the United States.

This NebFact ...


Nf05-632 Protecting Your Watershed, Thomas G. Franti, Steven R. Tonn Jan 2005

Nf05-632 Protecting Your Watershed, Thomas G. Franti, Steven R. Tonn

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Everyone lives in a watershed. A watershed is the land area that contributes water to a location, usually a stream, pond, lake or river. Everything we do on the suface of our watershed impacts the water quality of our streams, wetlands, ponds, lakes and rivers. Like organs in a body, every part of the watershed is essential. What happens in one part affects other downstream parts. This NebFacts discusses the threat of pollutions in our watersheds, common runoff pollutants, and best management practices for protecting the watershed.


Nf05-631 Understanding Watersheds, Thomas G. Franti, Steven R. Tonn Jan 2005

Nf05-631 Understanding Watersheds, Thomas G. Franti, Steven R. Tonn

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Watersheds are dynamic and unique places. They are complex webs of natural resources, — soil, water, air, plants and animals. Together land and water make a watershed a whole system.

This NebFacts covers what a watershed is, how it works, its functions, how human activities can alter watershed functions, and its management.


Nf05-592 Both Partners Are Responsible For The Relationship, Kathy Bosch Jan 2005

Nf05-592 Both Partners Are Responsible For The Relationship, Kathy Bosch

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Strong marriages or partnerships do not just happen; they require effort. The individual must work together to create and maintain a healthy, satisfying relationship. It is a responsibility that both partners share equally.

This NebFact discusses the different ways that make a marriage last through the years.


Nf05-625 Communicating With Families: Communicating With Families Of Infants, Debra E. Schroeder, Mary K. Warner, Mary Nelson, Eileen Krumbach, Sarah Effken Purcell, Janet S. Hanna, Kathy Bosch, John Defrain Jan 2005

Nf05-625 Communicating With Families: Communicating With Families Of Infants, Debra E. Schroeder, Mary K. Warner, Mary Nelson, Eileen Krumbach, Sarah Effken Purcell, Janet S. Hanna, Kathy Bosch, John Defrain

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Families have many adjustments to make as they transition to parenthood. Parenting is a lonely endeavor sometimes. Often families rely more on outside child care, and with that comes the need, particularly for families of infants, to keep the communication lines open between themselves and their child-care providers. A variety of techniques can be used to help families and child-care providers communicate effectively.


Nf05-630 Helping Children Resolve Conflict: Aggressive Behavior Of Children, Marjorie Kostelnik, Sarah Effken Purcell, Debra E. Schroeder, Mary Nelson, Eileen Krumbach, Janet S. Hanna, Kathy Bosch, John Defrain Jan 2005

Nf05-630 Helping Children Resolve Conflict: Aggressive Behavior Of Children, Marjorie Kostelnik, Sarah Effken Purcell, Debra E. Schroeder, Mary Nelson, Eileen Krumbach, Janet S. Hanna, Kathy Bosch, John Defrain

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

If you are a parent, guardian or child-care provider, witnessing children fighting is a common occurrence. Fighting or aggressive behavior can occur in various forms, whether it is slapping, grabbing, screaming, pinching, kicking, spitting, biting, threatening, teasing or a variety of other actions.

There are four different types of aggressive behavior: accidental, expressive, instrumental and hostile. It is important to understand the different types of aggressive behavior that children may display so your responses are effective.

This NebFact discusses these behaviors and the general skills needed in handling your children's aggressive behavior.


Nf05-629 Helping Children Resolve Conflict Pitfalls To Avoid During Conflict Mediation, Marjorie Kostelnik, Mary Nelson, Sarah Effken Purcell, Eileen Krumbach, Janet S. Hanna, Debra E. Schroeder, Kathy Bosch, John Defrain Jan 2005

Nf05-629 Helping Children Resolve Conflict Pitfalls To Avoid During Conflict Mediation, Marjorie Kostelnik, Mary Nelson, Sarah Effken Purcell, Eileen Krumbach, Janet S. Hanna, Debra E. Schroeder, Kathy Bosch, John Defrain

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

When using conflict mediation, children learn skills necessary to reach peaceful solutions. These skills include: communication, compromise, the ability to see how different aspects of a dispute are related, and the ability to consider their own perspective as well as that of another person. As children learn problem-solving procedures and words, they become increasingly capable of solving problems by themselves. There is evidence that these childhood learnings are maintained through the adult years.


Nf05-628 Helping Children Resolve Conflict Conflict Mediation Model, Marjorie Kostelnik, Debra E. Schroeder, Sarah Effken Purcell, Mary Nelson, Eileen Krumbach, Janet S. Hanna, Kathy Bosch, John Defrain Jan 2005

Nf05-628 Helping Children Resolve Conflict Conflict Mediation Model, Marjorie Kostelnik, Debra E. Schroeder, Sarah Effken Purcell, Mary Nelson, Eileen Krumbach, Janet S. Hanna, Kathy Bosch, John Defrain

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

During conflict mediation children learn the skills necessary to reach peaceful resolutions. These skills involve communication, compromise, the ability to see how different aspects of a dispute are related and the ability to consider their own perspective as well as that of another person.

Adults play an important role in the socialization of children. They help children develop social skills. This NebFact discusses how to teach children to resolve conflicts.


Nf05-627 Communicating With Families: Communication Techniques, Debra E. Schroeder, Mary K. Warner, Mary Nelson, Eileen Krumbach, Sarah Effken Purcell, Janet S. Hanna, Kathy Bosch, John Defrain Jan 2005

Nf05-627 Communicating With Families: Communication Techniques, Debra E. Schroeder, Mary K. Warner, Mary Nelson, Eileen Krumbach, Sarah Effken Purcell, Janet S. Hanna, Kathy Bosch, John Defrain

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

In the best child-care settings, providers and families work as a team. Each brings a unique point of view, and each shows concern for the child's growth and development. As a child-care professional, one of your roles in this partnership is to promote effective communication with families. It is important for child-care providers to develop and practice effective communication skills and implement them when communicating with families about their children.


Nf05-626 Communicating With Families: Building Relationships, Mary K. Warner, Debra E. Schroeder, Mary Nelson, Eileen Krumbach, Sarah Effken Purcell, Kathy Bosch, John Defrain Jan 2005

Nf05-626 Communicating With Families: Building Relationships, Mary K. Warner, Debra E. Schroeder, Mary Nelson, Eileen Krumbach, Sarah Effken Purcell, Kathy Bosch, John Defrain

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Successful child-care providers, preschool teachers and elementary teachers begin to establish positive relationships with the children in their care or classrooms as soon as possible. Here are some guidelines for making closer contact with the children's families.


Nf05-637 The Power Of Family Literacy, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain Jan 2005

Nf05-637 The Power Of Family Literacy, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Virtually all families want their children to learn to read and write, and to succeed in school, and are eager to provide any support necessary.

Family involvement in everyday language- and literacy-related activities has a significant impact on children's language dvevelopment acquisition of early literacy skills. Early language and literacy activities at home contribute to differences when children enter school.


Nf05-636 Depression, Myrna Dubois Jan 2005

Nf05-636 Depression, Myrna Dubois

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Feeling a little down? Discouraged? Those feelings are normal when life's challenges confront us from time to time. The feeling of discouragement usually goes away with a reasonable length of time. Depression, however, can hang around for weeks, months, even years.

This NebFacts discusses the two types of depression, their effects, resolution and treatment.


Nf05-645 Infants And Toddlers — Developing More Than One Language, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain Jan 2005

Nf05-645 Infants And Toddlers — Developing More Than One Language, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

When infants and toddlers are developing more than one language, the goal is that they will learn English and develop fluency in their home language. Children can become truly bilingual and be able to use two or more languages with fequal fluency. Children, families, schools, and communities all benefit when children keep their connection to their language and heritage.


Nf05-644 Relationships: The Heart Of Language And Literacy, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain Jan 2005

Nf05-644 Relationships: The Heart Of Language And Literacy, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Infants and toddlers learn early language and literacy skills in the context of their relationships with the adults around them as if they are putting together a puzzle. Most of the puzzle pieces involve taking turns with the baby — your turn, my turn, your turn, my turn. The turns might be with actions or with talking. The turns might be very quick or rather slow.

This NebFact discusses turn-taking; what it involves and the strategies used.


Nf05-643 Infants Develop Language Naturally, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain Jan 2005

Nf05-643 Infants Develop Language Naturally, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Did you know?

• Infants are mastering language simply by listening to us talk.

• Babies begin learning about language in the first months of life. They can hear the difference between all the consonants and vowels used in any language.

• By the age of 6 months, infants have trained their ears to the sounds of their native language and they have learned to distinguish these sounds before actually learning words.

Baby talk, or "Parentese," makes it easier for the baby to learn a language because the sounds are greatly exaggerated.

This NebFact discusses how to communicate with children, language and communication ...


Nf05-642 Symbols Of Literacy Development, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain Jan 2005

Nf05-642 Symbols Of Literacy Development, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Early environments matter and nurturing relationships are essential for literacy development of young children. Infants and toddlers who have secure relationships with their caregivers are more involved in literacy activities.

This NebFacts covers the interaction with symbols, physical and social features of symbols, and the use of words, symbols and print.


Nf95-641 Car — A Strategy For Learning, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain Jan 2005

Nf95-641 Car — A Strategy For Learning, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Language and literacy development starts at the very beginning of a child's life and is one of the main developmental events of early childhood. This process if facilitated by early adult-child interactions in which the adult guides and supports the child's learning by building on what the child already knows. Following the child's lead, a key strategy presented in Language Is the Key is one of the defining aspects of developmentally appropriate practice. It has been shown to successfuly facilitate early language development for children with and without disabilities.


Nf05-639 Early Literacy Checklist — In The Home, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain Jan 2005

Nf05-639 Early Literacy Checklist — In The Home, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This checklist represents the kinds of language and literacy development practices often seen in high-quality early childhood environments. The checklist encompasses all children birth to age 5 and is inclusive of the needs of children with disabilities and English language learners.


Nf05-638 Sharing Stories, Songs And Books, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain Jan 2005

Nf05-638 Sharing Stories, Songs And Books, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Language and literacy begin with sharing stories, songs and books. When telling a story, you can talk about yourself, the child and his/her experiences, the child's family, things you've read, seen on TV and at the movies, things that happen to your at work, and stories your elders have told.

This NebFacts covers the different techniques of using storytelling strategies, songs, and books when interacting with your children.


Ec05-473 Functional Foods, Theresa Herring, Julie A. Albrecht Jan 2005

Ec05-473 Functional Foods, Theresa Herring, Julie A. Albrecht

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Just as consumers grew weary of hearing about the bombardment of foods that contain unhealthy, disease-causing components, researchers and nutrition educators have shifted their focus to the study and promotion of functional foods. Foods that have physiologically active components, which can improve one's health and prevent disease beyond that of one's essential daily nutritional requirements, are called functional foods.

This Extension Circular defines functional foods. It reviews food label rules for functional foods, their physiologically active components, and their specific health benefits. Examples are provided of the advantages of whole food consumption compared to one isolated component. Key ...


Nf05-651 Learning From Children About Severe Weather, Leanne Manning, John Defrain, Dianne Swanson Jan 2005

Nf05-651 Learning From Children About Severe Weather, Leanne Manning, John Defrain, Dianne Swanson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

On May 22, 2004, at 8:08 p.m. the National Weather Service in Omaha issued a tornado warning for Gage County in southeast Nebraska until 9:15 p.m. At 8:03 p.m. a tornado was on the ground six miles south of Wilber moving northeast at 25 mph. At 8:16 p.m. law enforcement officials reported a tornado on the ground near Wilber moving northeast at 15 mph. These warnings were heard by those listening to television or radio and struck fear in the hearts of many on that night.

In the days and weeks that ...


Nf05-624 Omega-3 Fatty Acids, Jennifer Larsen, Linda S. Boeckner Jan 2005

Nf05-624 Omega-3 Fatty Acids, Jennifer Larsen, Linda S. Boeckner

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Fats in our food are categorized according to the predominant fatty acid that is present. Typically fats are categorized as saturafed fatty acids or unsaturated fatty acids. Some examples of foods that are high in saturated fats are butter and lard. These fats are solid at room temperature. Fats that are high in unsaturated fatty acids are liquid at room temperature. Examples are vegetable oils such as canola, corn, olive or soybean.

This NebFacts discusses the benefits of Omega-3 fatty acids, supplements, how much is enough and the cautions on eating certain fish.


Nf05-615 Trans Fatty Acids — Nutrient Listing Required By 2006, Karen Schledewitz, Linda S. Boeckner Jan 2005

Nf05-615 Trans Fatty Acids — Nutrient Listing Required By 2006, Karen Schledewitz, Linda S. Boeckner

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Trans fatty acids (TFAs) are a type of fat that occurs naturally in small amounts in beef and dairy products. They are also present in hydrogenated and partially hydrogenated oils found in processed foods.

This NebFact talks about what trans fatty acids are and where they can be found on the Nutrition Facts Label. It also talks about what to use in lieu of trans fatting acids for your heart health.


Nf05-652 Soybean Rust Fungicide Use Guidelines For Nebraska, Loren J. Giesler, John A. Wilson, Jennifer M. Rees Jan 2005

Nf05-652 Soybean Rust Fungicide Use Guidelines For Nebraska, Loren J. Giesler, John A. Wilson, Jennifer M. Rees

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

While the impact that soybean rust will have on Nebraska's soybean crop is unknown, producers should be prepared to manage the disease. When soybean rust occurs or is expected to occur shortly in Nebraska, growers can use the decision-aid flow chart on page 2 of this NebFact to determine whether to treat and, if treating, which class of fungicide (chlorothalonil, strobilurin, or triazole) to use.