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Ec07-101 2007 Spring Seed Guide, Lenis Alton Nelson, Bruce Anderson, Robert N. Klein, Richard B. Ferguson, David Baltensperger, Charles A. Shapiro, Stevan Z. Knezevic, James Krall Jan 2007

Ec07-101 2007 Spring Seed Guide, Lenis Alton Nelson, Bruce Anderson, Robert N. Klein, Richard B. Ferguson, David Baltensperger, Charles A. Shapiro, Stevan Z. Knezevic, James Krall

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This circular is a progress report of variety and hybrid performance tests conducted by the Agronomy/Horticulture Department, the Northeast, West Central and Panhandle Research and Extension Centers, the South Central Agricultural Laboratory as part of the University of Nebraska and University of Wyoming at Torrington. Conduct of experiments and publication of results is a joint effort of the Agricultural Research Division and the Cooperative Extension Service. The following pages include the results of our variety testing programs for many crop species throughtout the state. We hope you find this information useful as you make hybrid and variety decisions for ...


Ec06-155 Nutrient Management For Agronomic Crops In Nebraska, Richard B. Ferguson Jan 2006

Ec06-155 Nutrient Management For Agronomic Crops In Nebraska, Richard B. Ferguson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Nebraska is blessed with fertile soil and vast supplies of groundwater which combine to create an environment well-suited to the production of corn, wheat, grain sorghum, alfalfa, edible beans, and other agronomic crops used for human or animal consumption.

This manual is a guide to nutrient use from all sources for the production of Nebraska's major agronomic crops: corn, winter wheat, grain sorghum, oats, alfalfa, dry edible beans, soybean, sugar beets, popcorn, sunflower, millet, potatoes, and cool and warm season grasses for hay and pasture. Part I of the manual contains information focusing on basic principles of soil fertility ...


Ec05-130 Guide For Weed Management In Nebraska, Roch E. Gaussoin, Brady F. Kappler, Robert N. Klein, Stevan Z. Knezevic, Drew J. Lyon, Alex Martin, Fred Roeth, Gail A. Wicks, Robert G. Wilson, Robert A. Masters, Patrick J. Shea, Larry D. Schulze Jan 2005

Ec05-130 Guide For Weed Management In Nebraska, Roch E. Gaussoin, Brady F. Kappler, Robert N. Klein, Stevan Z. Knezevic, Drew J. Lyon, Alex Martin, Fred Roeth, Gail A. Wicks, Robert G. Wilson, Robert A. Masters, Patrick J. Shea, Larry D. Schulze

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

One of the major thrusts of all University of Nebraska weed science faculty is the Guide for Weed Management in Nebraska. This guide is not just the work of one or two people, rather it is a joint effort of all the authors to produce a comprehensive, information-packed resource. Each weed science faculty member is responsible for particular sections of the guide. The process of reviewing the current content, checking labels and research data and updating the content can be an extensive process. Each year new herbicide active ingredients and trade names are introduced and figuring out what a herbicide ...


Ec05-883 Crop And Livestock Prices For Nebraska Producers, 1960-2005, Darrell R. Mark, Dillon Feuz, Brad Heinrichs Jan 2005

Ec05-883 Crop And Livestock Prices For Nebraska Producers, 1960-2005, Darrell R. Mark, Dillon Feuz, Brad Heinrichs

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This report contains historical price data for the major crops and livestock commodities produced in Nebraska. Prices received by producers are reported for 1960-2005 for most of the commodities.

The data was compiled from Nebraska Agricultural Statistics Service and Agricultural Prices, National Agricultural Statistics Service, USDA; Oil Crops Situation and Outlook, Economic Research Service, USDA; Cotton and Wool Outlook, Economic Research Service, USDA; and Livestock and Grain Market News, Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. Sources of prices for each commodity are indicated on the tables.


Ec05-1573 Corn Insects Ii, Robert J. Wright, Terry A. Devries, James A. Kalisch Jan 2005

Ec05-1573 Corn Insects Ii, Robert J. Wright, Terry A. Devries, James A. Kalisch

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This two-page, 4-color extension circular covers information on Nebraska corn insects identification and management. These include: Western corn rootworm, Northern corn rootworm, seed corn maggot, wireworm, Southern corn leaf beetle, corn leaf aphid, twospotted spider mite, Banks grass mite, corn flea beetle, white grub, annual grub, three year grub, seed corn beetle, and chinch bug.


Ec05-1572 Corn Insects I, Robert J. Wright, Terry A. Devries, James A. Kalisch Jan 2005

Ec05-1572 Corn Insects I, Robert J. Wright, Terry A. Devries, James A. Kalisch

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This two-page, 4-color extension circular covers the identification and management of Nebraska corn insects. These include: European corn borer, Western bean cutworm, corn earworm, armyworm, fall armyworm, common stalk borer, and black cutworm.


Ec05-101 Spring Seed Guide, 2006, Lenis Alton Nelson, Bruce Anderson, Robert N. Klein, Roger Wesley Elmore, David D. Baltensperger, Charles A. Shapiro, Stevan Z. Knezevic, James Krall Jan 2005

Ec05-101 Spring Seed Guide, 2006, Lenis Alton Nelson, Bruce Anderson, Robert N. Klein, Roger Wesley Elmore, David D. Baltensperger, Charles A. Shapiro, Stevan Z. Knezevic, James Krall

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This circular is a progress report of variety and hybrid performance tests conducted by the Agronomy/Horticulture Department, the Northeast, West Central, and Panhandle Research and Extension Centers, the South Central Agricultural Laboratory as part of the University of Nebraska and University of Wyoming at Torrington. Conduct of experiments and publication of results is a joint effort of the Agricultural Research Division and the Cooperative Extension Service.


G05-1579 Using Modified Atmometers (EtGage®) For Irrigation Management, Suat Irmak, Jose O, Payero, Derrel L. Martin Jan 2005

G05-1579 Using Modified Atmometers (EtGage®) For Irrigation Management, Suat Irmak, Jose O, Payero, Derrel L. Martin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes the atmometer (evapotranspiration gage) and explains how it can be used for irrigation scheduling. Examlpes are provided to show how information collected with an atmometer can be used to estimate crop water use for corn and soybean.


Nf04-594 Resistanct Management For Yieldgard Rootworm™ Bt Corn, Robert J. Wright, Thomas E. Hunt Jan 2004

Nf04-594 Resistanct Management For Yieldgard Rootworm™ Bt Corn, Robert J. Wright, Thomas E. Hunt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

In 2003, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Monsanto announced the registration of YieldGard Rootworm™ corn containing event MON863. These hybrids express a protein in the roots from the soil bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) that is toxic to larval corn rootworms.

This NebFact discusses management requirements, refuge considerations, within-field configurations when using YieldGard Rootworm™.


Winter Grazing Standing Corn Plants For Beef Cows Under Maintenance Conditions, Dale Zobell, Don Synder, Ken Olson, Randall Wiedmeier Jun 2003

Winter Grazing Standing Corn Plants For Beef Cows Under Maintenance Conditions, Dale Zobell, Don Synder, Ken Olson, Randall Wiedmeier

All Current Publications

Corn is known as a forage crop that has the potential of yielding more energy per acre than any other forage crop in the U.S. Additionally, corn has an advantage as a winter grazing crop because its stem cures well, it stands above the snow, and it stands up in windy conditions as well as providing a windbreak for cattle grazing it.


Nf571 Aspergillus Flavus And Aflatoxins In Corn, Jim Stack, Mike Carlson Jan 2003

Nf571 Aspergillus Flavus And Aflatoxins In Corn, Jim Stack, Mike Carlson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The severe weather conditions of the 2002 growing season resulted in an increase in the incidence and severity of aflatoxin contamination of both food grade and feed grade corn in Nebraska.


Fumonisins In Corn, Jim Stack, Mike Carlson Jan 2003

Fumonisins In Corn, Jim Stack, Mike Carlson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact discusses the causes and occurrences of fumonisin in corn.


Ec03-1888 Ear Rots And Grain Molds Of Corn, James P. Stack, Loren J. Giesler, Robert M. Harveson, John E. Watkins, Jennifer L. Chaky Jan 2003

Ec03-1888 Ear Rots And Grain Molds Of Corn, James P. Stack, Loren J. Giesler, Robert M. Harveson, John E. Watkins, Jennifer L. Chaky

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This two-page, 4-color extension circular covers the ear rots and grain molds of corn in Nebraska. The diseases listed include: grain molds, Gibberella ear rot, Fusarium kernel or ear rot, red streak, Penicillium ear rot, Aspergillus ear or kernel rot, blue eye, Diplodia ear rot, and Nigrospora ear rot.


Ec03-883 Crop And Livestock Prices For Nebraska Producers, 1960-2003, Darrell R. Mark, Dillon Feuz, Roger Selley, Tina N. Barrett Jan 2003

Ec03-883 Crop And Livestock Prices For Nebraska Producers, 1960-2003, Darrell R. Mark, Dillon Feuz, Roger Selley, Tina N. Barrett

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This report contains historical price data for the major crops and livestock commodities produced in Nebraska. Prices received by producers are reported for 1960-2002 for most of the commodities.

The data was compiled from Nebraska Agricultural Statistics Services and Agricultural Prices, National Agricultural Statistics Service, USDA; Oil Crops Situation and Outlook, Economic Research Service, USDA; Cotton and Wool Outlook, Economic Research Service, USDA; and Livestock and Grain Market News, Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. Sources of prices for each commodity are indicated on the tables.


Ec03-101 Nebraska Seed Guide, 2004, Lenis Alton Nelson, Robert N. Klein, Roger Wesley Elmore, David D. Baltensperger, Charles A. Shapiro, Stevan Z. Knezevic, James Krall Jan 2003

Ec03-101 Nebraska Seed Guide, 2004, Lenis Alton Nelson, Robert N. Klein, Roger Wesley Elmore, David D. Baltensperger, Charles A. Shapiro, Stevan Z. Knezevic, James Krall

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This circular is a progress report of corn hybrid performance tests conducted by the Agronomy/Horticulture Department and the Northeast, South Central, West Central and Panhandle Research and Extension Centers of Nebraska and University of Wyoming at Torrington. Conduct of experiments and publication of results is a joint effort of the Agricultural Research Division and the Cooperative Extension Service.


G03-1521 Using Corn Hybrid Yield Data To Improve Selection Of Rapidly Changing Hybrids, Robert N. Klein, Lenis Alton Nelson, Roger Wesley Elmore Jan 2003

G03-1521 Using Corn Hybrid Yield Data To Improve Selection Of Rapidly Changing Hybrids, Robert N. Klein, Lenis Alton Nelson, Roger Wesley Elmore

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

How often should you change hybrids? One might conclude that to maximize corn yield, hybrids must be constantly replaced. Choosing the proper hybrid can greatly enhance crop production profitability. This NebGuide illustrates how to use corn hybrid test data and adjust it to your farm when selecting seed.


G03-1528 Recommended Seeding Rates And Hybrid Selection For Rainfed (Dryland) Corn In Nebraska, Robert N. Klein, Drew J. Lyon Jan 2003

G03-1528 Recommended Seeding Rates And Hybrid Selection For Rainfed (Dryland) Corn In Nebraska, Robert N. Klein, Drew J. Lyon

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Differences in climate between Lincoln and Scottsbluff are as great as from Lincoln to the east coast of the United States. These climatic differences across the state greatly affect recommended seeding rates for rainfed corn in Nebraska. This NebGuide provides information useful in assessing accumulated growing degree days, soil type and field conditions, average precipitation, and the field's microclimate when determining seeding rate for dryland corn.


Nf03-571 Aspergillus Flavus And Aflatoxins In Corn, Jim Stack, Michael Carlson Jan 2003

Nf03-571 Aspergillus Flavus And Aflatoxins In Corn, Jim Stack, Michael Carlson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The severe weather conditions of the 2002 growing season resulted in an increase in the incidence and severity of aflatoxin contamination of both food grade and feed grade corn in Nebraska.

The mycotoxin called aflatoxin is produced by the grain mold Aspergillus flavus. Not all isolates of A. flavus produced aflatoxin and isolates that are capable of producing aflatoxin do not always synthesize the toxin. Many factors including environmental conditions and host suscepbitility, determine the incidence and severity of grain mold and subsequent mycotoxin contamination.

This NebFact discusses the cause and occurrence of aflatoxin in corn; the effects it has ...


Nf03-570 Fumonisins In Corn, Jim Stack, Michael Carlson Jan 2003

Nf03-570 Fumonisins In Corn, Jim Stack, Michael Carlson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

During the past two years, millers have rejected some Nebraska food grade corn because it was contaminated with the mycotoxin fumonisin. Most of the contaminated samples and the highest levels of contamination were detected in corn from counties in the eastern half of Nebraska.

Fumonisins are mycotoxins produced by the grain molds Fusarium verticillioides and Fusarium proliferatum. These fungi are commonly found in corn throughout the United States.

This NebFact discusses the cause and occurrence of fumonisin in corn; the effects it has on plants, animals and humans; and management options to minimize fumonisin contamination.


G03-1521 Using Corn Hybrid Yield Data To Improve Selection Of Rapidly Changing Hybrids, Robert N. Klein, Lenis Alton Nelson, Roger Wesley Elmore Jan 2003

G03-1521 Using Corn Hybrid Yield Data To Improve Selection Of Rapidly Changing Hybrids, Robert N. Klein, Lenis Alton Nelson, Roger Wesley Elmore

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Choosing the proper hybrid can greatly enhance crop production profitability. This NebGuide illustrates how to use corn hybrid test data and adjust it to your farm when selecting seed. How often should you change hybrids? An Auburn University study compared the top corn hybrids from a 3-year regional trial (114 bushel average) with the top hybrids from the previous year's test (119 bushel average). Since the yields went from 114 to 119 bushels - a 5 bushel increase - using data from 11 locations and 8 years, should we expect twice that difference - a 10 bushel increase - with yields of 228 ...


Drought-Stressed Corn, Thomas Dorn, Bruce Anderson, Richard J. Rasby Jan 2002

Drought-Stressed Corn, Thomas Dorn, Bruce Anderson, Richard J. Rasby

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact details how to identify drought stress in corn, its effect on potential yield and how to maximize economic return from drought-damaged corn.


Atrazine And Non-Atrazine Herbicide Comparisons In Conventional Till Corn, Fred Roeth, Alex Martin Jan 2002

Atrazine And Non-Atrazine Herbicide Comparisons In Conventional Till Corn, Fred Roeth, Alex Martin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Sequential herbicide applications (preemergence followed by postemergence) were more consistent in weed control across four environments because the postemergence treatments controlled weed escapes and second flushes. Singular herbicide treatments were less effective in that regard. Several single applications gave good control but not the excellent control of the sequential treatments. Atrazine in the preemergence application failed to control velvetleaf, but provided good control when used postemergence. The non-atrazine herbicides were at least as effective as the atrazine herbicides.


Ec02-173 Spotted And Diffuse Knapweed, Neil L. Heckman, Ryan M. Goss, Roch E. Gaussoin, Stevan Z. Knezevic, John L. Lindquist Jan 2002

Ec02-173 Spotted And Diffuse Knapweed, Neil L. Heckman, Ryan M. Goss, Roch E. Gaussoin, Stevan Z. Knezevic, John L. Lindquist

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Spotted knapweed (Centaure amaculosa Lam. = C. biebersteinii DC.) and diffuse knapweed (C.diffusa Lam.) are two of Nebraska’s seven noxious weeds. They are also noxious in at least 17 other states. These are closely related species that are well adapted to a variety of habitats including open forests, rangelands and pastures, Conservation Reserve Program lands, roadsides, and ditch banks. Centaurea is a large genus of over 400 species, 32 of which are common weeds of the United States and several of which [e.g., yellowstar thistle, C. solstitalis L, and Russian knapweed, C. repens L. =Acroptilon repens (L.) DC ...


Ec02-172 Plumeless Thistle, Kara L. Hilgenfeld, Alex Martin Jan 2002

Ec02-172 Plumeless Thistle, Kara L. Hilgenfeld, Alex Martin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Plumeless thistle (Carduus acanthoides L.) is one of seven noxious weeds in Nebraska. An introduced invasive broadleaf weed native to Europe and Asia, plumeless thistle currently infests about 65,000 acres in Nebraska. Infestations of plumeless thistle may reduce productivity of pastures and rangeland, where infestations tend to be the largest. Plumeless thistle competes with and suppresses growth of desirable species. Heavy infestations prevent livestock from grazing the area and lighter infestations prevent livestock from eating plants growing near the thistle. Estimates place the annual loss in Nebraska agricultural production due to plumeless thistle at $162,000. Although plumeless thistle ...


Ec02-171 Canada Thistle, Robert G. Wilson Jan 2002

Ec02-171 Canada Thistle, Robert G. Wilson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Canada thistle [Cirsium arvense (L) Scop.] is one of the seven species defined by Nebraska law as a noxious weed. At least 35 other states also have determined by law that Canada thistle poses a threat to the economic, social, and aesthetic well-being of the residents of their state. Canada thistle is probably the most widespread of all the thistle species and many land managers consider it the most difficult thistle to control. In Nebraska, Canada thistle is estimated to infest 460,000 acres.


Ec02-177 Purple Loosestrife, Stevan Z. Knezevic Jan 2002

Ec02-177 Purple Loosestrife, Stevan Z. Knezevic

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) is an introduced invasive weed that isover running thousands of acres of wetlands and waterways in the Midwest. Once purple loosestrife invades a wetland, natural habitat is lost and the productivity of native plant and animal communities is severely reduced. These losses in turn interfere with various levels of the ecosystem and area recreational activities such as fishing, boating and hunting, diminishing revenue from tourism and impairing the social and economic well being of local communities. A single control measure cannot provide long-term, sustainable control of this weed. An integrated approach, using a variety of mechanical ...


Ec02-176 Musk Thistle, Fred Roeth, Steven R. Melvin, Irvin L. Schleufer Jan 2002

Ec02-176 Musk Thistle, Fred Roeth, Steven R. Melvin, Irvin L. Schleufer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Musk thistle (Carduus nutans L.) is an introduced invasive broadleaf weed native to Europe, North Africa, and Asia. In these areas it is a minor weed because natural enemies keep its population low. When the plant was introduced into North America, its natural enemies were left behind. Without these natural checks, the thistle is able to thrive and compete with native vegetation.

Musk thistles aggressively invade all lands in Nebraska. Typical cropland weed control methods are very effective against them; however, land with permanent cover (pasture, range, roadway ditches and wasteland) that is not tilled or treated with a herbicide ...


Ec02-174 Leafy Spurge, Robert A. Masters, Brady F. Kappler Jan 2002

Ec02-174 Leafy Spurge, Robert A. Masters, Brady F. Kappler

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Leafy spurge is an invasive weed that infests over three million acres in the northern Great Plains and the prairie provinces of Canada. It is commonly found in rangelands, pastures, roadsides, rights-of-way, and woodlands. Leafy spurge can reduce rangeland and pasture carrying capacity by as much as 75 percent because it competes with forages and cattle avoid grazing areas infested with this weed. In North Dakota where leafy spurge infests about 900,000 acres, estimates of direct and indirect losses exceed $100 million each year. In Nebraska, the direct loss in forage value attributed to leafy spurge has been estimated ...


Ec02-1883 Corn Disease Profiles, James P. Stack, Loren J. Giesler, John E. Watkins, Robert M. Harveson, Jennifer L. Chaky Jan 2002

Ec02-1883 Corn Disease Profiles, James P. Stack, Loren J. Giesler, John E. Watkins, Robert M. Harveson, Jennifer L. Chaky

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This two-page, four-color extension circular covers the many diseases of corn in Nebraska. It list and describes corn diseases such as: anthracnose, common smut, bacterial stalk rot and top rot, holcus spot, Stewart's Wilt, Goss's bacterial wilt and blight, common rust, southern rust, and gray leaf rust.


Ec02-893 Basis Patterns For Selected Sites In Nebraska For Corn, Wheat, Sorghum, And Soybeans, Lynn Lutgen Jan 2002

Ec02-893 Basis Patterns For Selected Sites In Nebraska For Corn, Wheat, Sorghum, And Soybeans, Lynn Lutgen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The following publication contains corn basis patterns for several towns in Nebraska. The basic price information was collected through electronic media. The listing includes towns that are representative of different geographic locations in Nebraska. The amount of data varies among locations. This publication will be updated each year by adding a year's data to each location which will allow the user to observe changes in the basis patterns over time.