Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Education Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 29 of 29

Full-Text Articles in Education

Farm, Ranch And Home Quarterly Institute Of Agriculture And Natural Resources, University Of Nebraska- Lincoln Oct 1979

Farm, Ranch And Home Quarterly Institute Of Agriculture And Natural Resources, University Of Nebraska- Lincoln

Farm, Ranch and Home Quarterly

In this issue:

IANR Informs Nebraska .................................... 2

Electromagnetic Energy- Study Aims At Pest Control ............................... 3

IAN R Staff Reaches Out With' Partners' Exchange....................... 6

Weather or Not ... Climatology Center Prepares For the Future ................. 9

Compost: A Solution For Feedlot Wastes ...................... 13

Electron Microscope- An 'Eye' on Cattle Digestion .............................. 16

ALYSSA: Fascinating, Frustrating, Exhausting and Unsinkable ......................... 19

Research Digest .......................................... 21

The Hamburger Story- Beef Shortages Exceed Demands .......................... 22

Dixon County 4-Hers Adopt Grandparents ................... 24

Hybrid or Crossbred?- Genetic Study Shows the Basic Difference .................. 26


Farm, Ranch And Home Quarterly Institute Of Agriculture And Natural Resources, University Of Nebraska- Lincoln Jul 1979

Farm, Ranch And Home Quarterly Institute Of Agriculture And Natural Resources, University Of Nebraska- Lincoln

Farm, Ranch and Home Quarterly

In this issue:

Exciting Events................. 2

Cracked Eggs Are No Yolking Matter.................. 3

Spinoff Research................ 5

Save Those Clippings!.................... 6

IANR Reaches Out- From Nebraska to the World................... 8

Rainbarrels and Reservoirs- Water Storage in Nebraska..................... 10

PUMP Helps Operators Trace Total Irrigation Costs.................. 14

Irrigation Weed Seed....................... 16

Telling the Water Level Story........................ 18

Family Importance and Satisfaction- Quality of Life................. 20

Fusarium Blight- A Common Disease in Bluegrass Lawns...................... 22

Composting Can Benefits Nebraska Communities.................... 25


Farm, Ranch And Home Quarterly Institute Of Agriculture And Natural Resources, University Of Nebraska- Lincoln Apr 1979

Farm, Ranch And Home Quarterly Institute Of Agriculture And Natural Resources, University Of Nebraska- Lincoln

Farm, Ranch and Home Quarterly

In this issue:

We're Serving You ........................................ 2

Youth County-Juniors Find Action in County Government ............................... 3

Farmer's Market-From Farm to Fork ....................... 4

Dog Owner's Beware-Mosquitoes Spread Heart-worm in Nebraska ......................6

Tap and Sap-Making Maple Syrup in Nebraska .............. 8

How Do Children Cope When Parents Break Up? ............. 10

Free-Wheeling Garden Is Edible, Educational ................. 12

Citizenship Comes Alive-With Impact '78! .................. 14

Nebraskans Play a Role in Care Labeling .................... 16

Town or City-There's No Place Like HOME ................. 18


G74-449 Making Yogurt At Home, Robert W. Hutkins, Susan Sumner Jan 1979

G74-449 Making Yogurt At Home, Robert W. Hutkins, Susan Sumner

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Information on and instructions for making yogurt are included here.

Yogurt is a tangy, nutritionally excellent dairy product that can be made at home. The milk used contains a higher concentration of solids than normal milk. By increasing the solids content of the milk, a firm, rather than soft, end product results. Addition of nonfat dry milk (NFDM) is the easiest at-home method for doing this.

Yogurt is made by inoculating certain bacteria (starter culture), usually Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus, into milk. After inoculation, the milk is incubated at approximately 110°F ± 5°F until firm; the milk is ...


Heg79-104 Auto Insurance Insights, Kathleen Prochaska-Cue Jan 1979

Heg79-104 Auto Insurance Insights, Kathleen Prochaska-Cue

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication examines the basics of auto insurance.

Transportation costs are the third largest expense category for the average family, claiming up to 20 percent and more of family take-home pay. One of the liveliest topics of conversation is the high cost of auto insurance coverage and ways to cut premium costs.


Heg79-103 Homeowners Insurance Insights, Kathleen Prochaska-Cue Jan 1979

Heg79-103 Homeowners Insurance Insights, Kathleen Prochaska-Cue

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication provides basic information about homeowners insurance.

Most of us have property we want to protect against unknown dangers that might damage or destroy it. Homeowners or renters insurance can provide that protection. These policies include both property and liability insurance. They usually exclude motor vehicles for recreational or highway use.

The properties covered and the perils those properties can be insured against are listed in the policy. Your house, garage, and other structures on your lot are covered. Personal properties including household contents and other personal belongings are covered up to specified limits. Perils are listed under various ...


Heg79-102 Health And Disability Insurance Insights, Kathleen Prochaska-Cue Jan 1979

Heg79-102 Health And Disability Insurance Insights, Kathleen Prochaska-Cue

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication covers the basics of health and disability insurance.

Good health is one of the personal goals of almost every individual or family. Because health is so important to a person's plans, providing for good health care--at a reasonable cost--is a major concern.

About 85 percent of the non-institutionalized population in the United States has some form of health insurance. Approximately three-fourths of those people covered are covered through group health insurance policies.

In the past 20 years medical costs have increased rapidly because of an increased demand for medical care by our health-conscious society, a shortage of ...


Ec79-1863 Dry Edible Bean Diseases, James R. Steadman, Eric D. Kerr, John E. Watkins Jan 1979

Ec79-1863 Dry Edible Bean Diseases, James R. Steadman, Eric D. Kerr, John E. Watkins

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This extension circular discusses the diseases and symptoms of dry edible beans. Diseases discussed here include: common bacterial blight, halo blight, brown spot, wilt, fusarium root rot, rhizoctonia root rot, white mold, bronzing, and rust.


G79-429 Tan Spot Disease Of Wheat (Revised June 1993), John E. Watkins, Robert N. Klein, Eric D. Kerr Jan 1979

G79-429 Tan Spot Disease Of Wheat (Revised June 1993), John E. Watkins, Robert N. Klein, Eric D. Kerr

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes the development of tan spot disease in wheat and gives recommendations for controlling it by means of crop rotation, fungicides and good crop residue management.

Tan spot, caused by the fungus Pyrenophora tritici-repentis, is a major leafspot disease of winter wheat in the Great Plains of North America. It has become an increasing problem in wheat cropping systems using conservation tillage. Although tan spot can be a serious threat by itself, it more often occurs as a part of a foliar disease complex involving tan spot, leaf rust and Septoria leaf blotch. Usually tan spot symptoms appear ...


G79-466 Egg Cleaning Procedures For The Household Flock, Daniel E. Bigbee, Glenn W. Froning Jan 1979

G79-466 Egg Cleaning Procedures For The Household Flock, Daniel E. Bigbee, Glenn W. Froning

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide contains steps for producing clean, sanitary eggs. Household poultry flocks may produce a high percentage of dirty eggs. Many of these eggs are soiled because they are laid in dirty nests or are being laid on the floor. Dirty eggs can be a health hazard if they are not properly cleaned and sanitized. The best control method is to prevent soiling of the eggs. We can't stop the production of floor eggs, but we can keep them to a minimum if we start training the flock early.


G79-428 Spring Flowering Bulbs, Don Steinegger, Anne Streich, Donald E. Janssen Jan 1979

G79-428 Spring Flowering Bulbs, Don Steinegger, Anne Streich, Donald E. Janssen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Selecting, planting, caring for, harvesting and forcing spring flowering bulbs are discussed in this publication.

Spring flowering bulbs may be used to provide early season color in your garden while other plants are slowly developing. When the bulbs have finished blooming, the dying foliage can be hidden by the developing growth of other flowers and shrubs in the bed. Spring flowering bulbs offer an early start to a full season of color in your garden.

You can choose from hundreds of spring flowering bulbs that produce plants varying in flower color, form and height. Among the most popular are tulip ...


G79-431 The Four-Flap Graft: An Easy Grafting Technique For Nut Or Hardwood Trees, William A. Gustafson Jan 1979

G79-431 The Four-Flap Graft: An Easy Grafting Technique For Nut Or Hardwood Trees, William A. Gustafson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide provides directions for a relatively simple method of grafting.

Grafting is the technique of propagation whereby a stem or bud of one plant is joined to a branch or root of another closely related or compatible plant so that a union forms and growth continues. The four-flap graft technique is one of the most successful propagation procedures used by homeowners and amateur tree growers. This technique of grafting does not require a great deal of grafting experience. It is ideal to use with small caliper trees or branches up to one inch in diameter.


G79-477 Beef Herd Management Calendar, Paul Q. Guyer Jan 1979

G79-477 Beef Herd Management Calendar, Paul Q. Guyer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication contains a brief outline of management practices to be followed at various stages of the cow's reproductive cycle or at various times of the year.

Good management is the key to a successful beef production program. A high capital requirement and a relatively low return emphasize the need for effective management to maximize the profit potential of beef cows.


G79-481 Setting A Realistic Corn Yield Goal (Revised January 2004), Achim Dobermann, Charles A. Shapiro Jan 1979

G79-481 Setting A Realistic Corn Yield Goal (Revised January 2004), Achim Dobermann, Charles A. Shapiro

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Corn growers need to set a realistic corn yield goal in order to make sound decisions on corn hybrid, seeding rate, fertilizer application, and irrigation need. The goal should be the most profitable yield that can be expected for the particular set of soil, climate, and management practices. Yield goals should gradually increase over time, but cannot exceed the theoretical yield potential. This NebGuide discusses how to set a realistic corn yield goal by acknowledging climatic yield limitations of corn in Nebraska and the yield history in a field.


G79-464 Composting Municipal Sewage Sludge Slurry, Leon Chesnin Jan 1979

G79-464 Composting Municipal Sewage Sludge Slurry, Leon Chesnin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Municipalities can save operating expenses, eliminate pollution problems and increase the convenience of their waste management program by recycling their sewage sludge slurry in agricultural soils.

Sewage sludge slurries have from 2 to 10-percent solids depending on the treatment plant design and operation procedures. Sewage slurries with more than 8 percent solids are difficult to pump because of high friction in the pipe lines and pump mechanism. Sewage slurries can be applied to agricultural fields by gravity flow and sprinkler irrigation systems, as well as by tank trucks that either broadcast spray on, or inject the slurry into, the soil ...


G79-436 Control Of Downy Brome In Alfalfa, Charles R. Fenster, Gail A. Wicks, Robert G. Wilson Jan 1979

G79-436 Control Of Downy Brome In Alfalfa, Charles R. Fenster, Gail A. Wicks, Robert G. Wilson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Downy brome in alfalfa indicates poor alfalfa management or failure to control downy brome around field boundaries. It lowers the quality of the first cutting of hay, but can be controlled by one or more of the following: (1) planting in downy brome-free soil, (2) maintaining good vigorous alfalfa stands, (3) using adapted varieties, (4) having adequate fertility - especially phosphorus in the soil, (5) applying timely and correct amounts of irrigation water, (6) controlling downy brome in adjacent areas, and (7) use of herbicides.


G79-434 Feeding Guides For The Ewes, Ted Doane Jan 1979

G79-434 Feeding Guides For The Ewes, Ted Doane

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

In utilizing the information in this publication, the sheepman and those advising him must keep in mind the ultimate objectives of the production program in question.

The major problem in nutrition is the definition of the desired animal function. Maintenance of the ewe, for example, is generally thought of in terms of the dry ewe. Yet maintenance of productive functions is a constant cost in ewe nutrition, whether she is pregnant, lactating, dry, or in the process of being bred for another year.

In utilizing the information in this publication, the sheepman and those advising him must keep in mind ...


G79-433 Rearing Lambs On Milk Replacers, Ted Doane Jan 1979

G79-433 Rearing Lambs On Milk Replacers, Ted Doane

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Rearing orphan lambs on milk replacers can help increase profit.

Orphan lambs can be an extra profit to the farm flock. As much as $40/lamb can be paid to labor if time is available. A warm room (in the winter) and some basic equipment are all that are necessary.

A large portion of the nation's lamb crop dies from starvation during the first week after birth. Orphan lambs less than 4 weeks of age usually require the use of milk replacer supplementation. Switching lambs to milk replacers shortly after birth has not reached its full potential in sheep ...


G79-432 Creep Feeding Lambs, Ted Doane Jan 1979

G79-432 Creep Feeding Lambs, Ted Doane

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses creep feeding for lambs, making supplemental feed available only to nursing lambs.

Creep feeding is a management practice of making supplemental feed available only to nursing lambs. Creep feeding is desirable because: (1) lambs gain as much as a third to half a pound per day more when their milk diet is supplemented with grain, (2) the lambs are ready for market 1 to 2 months earlier, thus earlier marketing is adapted to a higher market for spring lambs, and (3) the lambs are not allowed to go to spring pasture, thus permitting more ewes on the ...


G79-453 Sheep Space Allotments, Ted Doane Jan 1979

G79-453 Sheep Space Allotments, Ted Doane

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide helps sheep producers plan for optimum spacing requirements for different classes of sheep.

Many sheep producers are converting old farmstead buildings to livestock facilities, or are interested in building new units for sheep. A producer planning his sheep facilities needs to know the optimum spacing required for different classes of sheep. This NebGuide is designed to help make these decisions.


G79-474 Understanding Wind Erosion And Its Control, William A. Hayes, C.R. Fenster Jan 1979

G79-474 Understanding Wind Erosion And Its Control, William A. Hayes, C.R. Fenster

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Wind erosion is a serious hazard on millions of acres of land in the United States, most of which are in the Great Plains.

There are a number of things an individual can do control wind erosion but basically they all point to accomplishing one or more of the following objectives:

1. Reduce the wind velocity at the soil surface. This is done with windbreaks, crop residues, cover crops, surface roughness, and wind stripcropping.

2. Trap soil particles. This is accomplished by ridging or roughening the soil surface to trap moving soil particles.

3. Increase size of soil aggregates. This ...


Ec79-1206 Roses, Donald H. Steinegger, Frederick P. Baxendale, John E. Watkins, Amy Greving Jan 1979

Ec79-1206 Roses, Donald H. Steinegger, Frederick P. Baxendale, John E. Watkins, Amy Greving

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Roses are one of the most versatile and exciting plant groups to use in landscape compositions. There are rose cultivars (varieties) adapted for almost any garden site or landscape purpose, including formal beds and perennial borders, arbors, trellises, hedges, ground covers, steep banks, edging, accent, specimen plants, and as patio or tub plants.

The most common rose types are hybrid teas, floribundas, grandifloras, and climbers. More people are becoming familiar with the so-called "old fashioned" or shrub roses. Many of these are well-adapted to Nebraska and to water-conserving landscapes.


G79-476 Composition Of Feeds In Relation To Cattle Nutrition, Paul Q. Guyer, Foster G. Owen Jan 1979

G79-476 Composition Of Feeds In Relation To Cattle Nutrition, Paul Q. Guyer, Foster G. Owen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide examines the major nutritional components of cattle feed. Plants serve as the major source of feed for livestock. Nutrients required for maintenance and production are provided by various plants and plant derived feeds along with small amounts from non-plant sources. The major constituents of plants are water, carbohydrates, protein, fat, minerals and vitamins. Both plants and animals contain these nutrients, but the relative proportions vary more in plants.


G79-467 Livestock Water Quality, Paul Q. Guyer Jan 1979

G79-467 Livestock Water Quality, Paul Q. Guyer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The purpose of this report is to discuss what is involved in livestock water quality and how one goes about getting an analysis that will help in determining this quality, and to assist in the interpretation of such an analysis.

A successful livestock enterprise requires a good water supply, both in terms of quantity and quality. While shortage is obvious to the stockowner, he sometimes needs the help of a laboratory in evaluating the quality of a supply. The purpose of this report is to discuss what is involved in livestock water quality and how one goes about getting an ...


G79-445 Soybean Variety Selection, Leroy V. Svec Jan 1979

G79-445 Soybean Variety Selection, Leroy V. Svec

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide has information on soybean characteristics that should be considered before selecting a variety to plant.

Soybean characteristics that need to be considered in making the selection of a variety to plant include maturity, yield potential, plant type, height, seed size, emergence score, lodging, shattering, and disease and insect resistance. Many years are required to develop a new variety from the time an initial cross of soybeans is made until the time seed is available on a widespread basis. The advance of a potential variety through the early generations may be accomplished with only a few seeds of the ...


G79-471 Choosing Corn Hybrids, Lenis Alton Nelson Jan 1979

G79-471 Choosing Corn Hybrids, Lenis Alton Nelson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication explains what factors to consider and compare when selecting a corn hybrid and how to obtain recent hybrid test data. One of the most important decisions a corn producer makes is choosing the hybrid seed. Hundreds of hybrid names and numbers are advertised and offered for sale. Selecting the few that offer the greatest yield and profit potential requires time, effort, and study. This should be a continuous process for a corn grower because important information on new or established hybrids may be encountered at any time.


G79-430 Oat Production In Nebraska (Revised March 1992), Russell Moomaw, Charles A. Shapiro Jan 1979

G79-430 Oat Production In Nebraska (Revised March 1992), Russell Moomaw, Charles A. Shapiro

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Information is provided for various oat production practices including seed selection, fertilizing, planting, weed control and harvest. Oats were among the first crops grown by pioneers who settled eastern Nebraska. As recently as 1950, Nebraska produced 2.7 million acres of oats. Acreage has declined steadily, however, and in 1990 there were just 300,000 acres. Oats are grown throughout the state, with the majority being in eastern Nebraska where the cool, moist climate provides for the best growth. The feed value of oats also favors its production in northeast Nebraska where swine, dairy cattle, and beef cattle production are ...


G79-465 Urinary Calculi (Waterbelly) In Cattle And Sheep, Ivan G. Rush, Dale Grotelueschen Jan 1979

G79-465 Urinary Calculi (Waterbelly) In Cattle And Sheep, Ivan G. Rush, Dale Grotelueschen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication discusses the symptoms, management and treatment of various types of urinary calculi diseases in cattle and sheep.

The term "urinary calculi" refers to deposits in the urinary tract. These deposits may block the flow of urine, particularly in male cattle and sheep. Prolonged blockage generally results in rupture of the urinary bladder or urethra, releasing urine into the surrounding tissues. This produces the condition commonly referred to as "waterbelly."

Two types of urinary calculi, both mineral in nature, predominate in cattle and sheep: (1) the phosphatic type formed principally under feedlot conditions and (2) the siliceous type occurring ...


Heg79-101 Insurance -- What Kind Do You Need?, Kathleen Prochaska-Cue Jan 1979

Heg79-101 Insurance -- What Kind Do You Need?, Kathleen Prochaska-Cue

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide examines various types of risks and the need for insurance.

Have you spent time recently with an insurance agent who was trying to explain an old policy or to sell you a new one? Perhaps you felt you didn't know which questions to ask about what you were signing, or how the policy would pay in an emergency.

Most people would like to better understand insurance terms and the reasons for buying insurance. Before you visit with an agent, you will want to answer some basic questions about an insurance purchase that is adequate for your situation.