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Full-Text Articles in Education

State Of The Field: What Is The Legacy Of The Common Schools Movement? Revisiting Carl Kaestle's 1983 Pillars Of The Republic, Johann N. Neem Nov 2016

State Of The Field: What Is The Legacy Of The Common Schools Movement? Revisiting Carl Kaestle's 1983 Pillars Of The Republic, Johann N. Neem

Johann N. Neem

Perhaps no one put it better than Ellwood Cubberley who, during the first half of the twentieth century, was America’s best-known education historian. Cubberley had attended common schools in Indiana, taught school, and served as superintendent in San Diego, before becoming an education professor at Stanford in 1898 and receiving his doctorate from Teachers College. In his 1919 Public Education in the United States, written for normal-school students, Cubberley laid down a moral tale. He was on the side of the school reformers. His story told of the heroic efforts of Horace Mann and others to overcome ignorance and ...


Is The Common Core A Threat To History Education?, Johann N. Neem, Thomas Fallace, Fritz Fischer Oct 2015

Is The Common Core A Threat To History Education?, Johann N. Neem, Thomas Fallace, Fritz Fischer

Johann N. Neem

With the vast majority of schools
in the United States teaching and assessing the
Common Core, these new standards essentially
established a national curriculum—the first in the
nation’s history. Is this a good thing for American
schools? Is this a good thing for the teaching of
history?


Is Jefferson A Founding Father Of Democratic Education?, Johann N. Neem Jun 2015

Is Jefferson A Founding Father Of Democratic Education?, Johann N. Neem

Johann N. Neem

This response argues that it is reasonable to consider Thomas Jefferson a proponent of democratic education. It suggests that Jefferson's education proposals sought to ensure the wide distribution of knowledge and that Jefferson's legacy remains important to us today.


Does History Matter? A Cautionary Tale For The Tuning Project, Johann N. Neem Jun 2015

Does History Matter? A Cautionary Tale For The Tuning Project, Johann N. Neem

Johann N. Neem

There is good reason to be concerned about the future of academic history and, more generally, the liberal arts. As increasing numbers of Americans seek higher education, colleges are under pressure to serve directly the vocational needs of students and businesses. Recent efforts to defend the liberal arts therefore emphasize the development of "transferable skills." A liberal education, advocates argue, prepares students for high-level jobs because it fosters critical thinking, analytical skills, and creativity. There is evidence that these skills may be developed more effectively in the liberal arts than in vocational fields.


Review Of: One Nation Under Law: America's Early National Struggles To Separate Church And State, And The Founders On God And Government, Johann N. Neem May 2014

Review Of: One Nation Under Law: America's Early National Struggles To Separate Church And State, And The Founders On God And Government, Johann N. Neem

Johann N. Neem

Mark D. McGarvie's One Nation Under Law is the most innovative recent study of church-state relations in the early republic. McGarvie argues that the separation of church and state resulted from the contract clause of the Constitution, not the First Amendment, and that the separation of church and state was the original intent of the Constitution's Framers. The Framers sought to reconstruct American society along liberal lines, replacing both colonial Christian communitarianism and classical republicanism with a radical new society.