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Articles 601 - 630 of 20931

Full-Text Articles in Education

Nobody’S At The Golden Door: The Effect Of Xenophobia On Us University Enrollment, Abhijeet R. Shirsat, Richard Brown Iii Apr 2018

Nobody’S At The Golden Door: The Effect Of Xenophobia On Us University Enrollment, Abhijeet R. Shirsat, Richard Brown Iii

Ray Browne Conference on Cultural and Critical Studies

A rise in xenophobic political rhetoric, presidential policy and far-right populism have led to a dramatic decrease in international student enrollment in US colleges and universities. For the first time since 9/11, American institutions of higher learning are facing the effect of widespread fear among prospective students from around the globe. After the election of President Donald J. Trump in 2016, universities reported the number of international students enrolling in their schools fell by seven percent and continues to decline. Seeking to allay the fear and uncertainty in their international student communities, colleges and universities are resisting proposed immigration ...


4-4-2018 Faculty Senate Minutes, Marc Cyr Apr 2018

4-4-2018 Faculty Senate Minutes, Marc Cyr

Faculty Senate Minutes

No abstract provided.


Meeting Minutes, Wku Council Of Academic Deans Apr 2018

Meeting Minutes, Wku Council Of Academic Deans

Council of Academic Deans

Meeting regarding university libraries, budget, graduation and class schedules.


Extension Of Tenure Clock, Ted Brimeyer Apr 2018

Extension Of Tenure Clock, Ted Brimeyer

Faculty Senate Index

No abstract provided.


Rural Students’ Sense Of Belonging At A Large Public University, Benjamin P. Heinisch Apr 2018

Rural Students’ Sense Of Belonging At A Large Public University, Benjamin P. Heinisch

Educational Administration: Theses, Dissertations, and Student Research

This qualitative case study explored how undergraduate students from rural areas experience higher education environments and develop a sense of belonging at a large Midwestern public university. This study defined rural considering students’ hometown population size and density as well as each individual participant’s constructed reality of a rural identity (Crockett, Shanahan, & Jackson-Newsom, 2000). The following questions guided this study: (1) How does students’ identification with their rural background influence how they experience their college environment? (2) What do rural students see as key environmental factors affecting their sense of belonging? (3) Is the institution providing supportive environments for ...


Ua12/2/1 College Heights Herald, Wku Student Affairs Apr 2018

Ua12/2/1 College Heights Herald, Wku Student Affairs

WKU Archives Records

Newsletter recapping the top stories of the week.


Editor's Column, Jacob P. Gross Apr 2018

Editor's Column, Jacob P. Gross

Journal of Student Financial Aid

N/A


Institutional Variation In Enrollment Of Low-Income Students, James Monks Apr 2018

Institutional Variation In Enrollment Of Low-Income Students, James Monks

Journal of Student Financial Aid

Socioeconomic diversity in tertiary education has come under heightened scrutiny in the past few years. This paper estimates the relationship between prices (both sticker price and net price), financial aid policies, and selectivity on the variation of low-income students across postsecondary institutions. All three factors are significant in identifying variation across postsecondary institutions in the representation of Pell Grant recipients as a percentage of an institution’s entering class. A focus on net price alone ignores the correlation between sticker price, selectivity, and financial aid policies on low-income students’ enrollment outcomes.


Students’ Perspectives On A Gap-Funded Program: The Community Scholarship Program Of Mccracken County, Kentucky, Karen R. Hlinka, Kevin L. Gericke, S. Renea Akin, Lisa G. Stephenson Apr 2018

Students’ Perspectives On A Gap-Funded Program: The Community Scholarship Program Of Mccracken County, Kentucky, Karen R. Hlinka, Kevin L. Gericke, S. Renea Akin, Lisa G. Stephenson

Journal of Student Financial Aid

In 2010, McCracken County, Kentucky implemented the Community Scholarship Program (CSP) to provide graduates of high schools in the county an opportunity to receive a tuition-free community college education. Quantitative data was collected throughout the various stages of student progress through the program. As the first cohort of CSP students approached graduation from West Kentucky Community and Technical College (WKCTC) in Spring 2016, we initiated a qualitative study. We interviewed 19 of the 88 continuously enrolled students from the first CSP cohort in a series of three focus groups in February and March of 2016. Those group interviews focused on ...


Understanding Loan Use And Debt Burden Among Low-Income And Minority Students At A Large Urban Community College, Maria Luna-Torres, Lyle Mckinney, Catherine Horn, Sara Jones Apr 2018

Understanding Loan Use And Debt Burden Among Low-Income And Minority Students At A Large Urban Community College, Maria Luna-Torres, Lyle Mckinney, Catherine Horn, Sara Jones

Journal of Student Financial Aid

This study examined a sample of community college students from a diverse, large urban community college system in Texas. To gain a deeper understanding about the effects of background characteristics on student borrowing behaviors and enrollment outcomes, the study employed descriptive statistics and regression techniques to examine two separate samples of students consisting of 1) loan recipients and 2) non-loan recipients. Chen’s heterogeneous research model served as the conceptual framework in the selection of predictors of interest and outcome variables. This study primarily focused on the relationship between borrowing and enrollment outcomes of low-income and racially/ethnically diverse students ...


Higher Education Administration Newsletter, Spring 2018, Saint Cloud State University Apr 2018

Higher Education Administration Newsletter, Spring 2018, Saint Cloud State University

Higher Education Administration Newsletter

No abstract provided.


Ufa Aac Library Sub-Committee Meeting Minutes, April 2018, Bethany Kenyon Apr 2018

Ufa Aac Library Sub-Committee Meeting Minutes, April 2018, Bethany Kenyon

UFA AAC Library Sub-committee Meeting Minutes

Meeting report from the University Faculty Assembly Academic Affairs Committee's Library Sub-committee meeting at the University of New England.


Ua52/1 Out Of The Box, Wku Archives Apr 2018

Ua52/1 Out Of The Box, Wku Archives

WKU Archives Records

Newsletter created by and about WKU Archives and the records management program.


Diversity & Inclusion Update - Spring 2018, Office Of Diversity & Inclusion Apr 2018

Diversity & Inclusion Update - Spring 2018, Office Of Diversity & Inclusion

Diversity & Inclusion Update

This Spring 2018 newsletter discusses ongoing campus initiatives to facilitate diversity and inclusion efforts on campus. Topics discussed include continued campus changes inspired by the January 2016 Town Hall meeting, such as the expansion of the Office of Multicultural Engagement/Mosaic House, and programming held over the previous semester to raise multicultural awareness, such as workshops held during Pride Week, Peace and Justice Week, Stop Bias @ the Burg Week, and the Institute for Healing Racism.


Journal Of The National Collegiate Honors Council, Vol. 19, No. 1 (Spring/Summer 2018): Forum On Honors And Social Justice, National Collegiate Honors Council Apr 2018

Journal Of The National Collegiate Honors Council, Vol. 19, No. 1 (Spring/Summer 2018): Forum On Honors And Social Justice, National Collegiate Honors Council

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

Call for Papers

Editorial Policy, Deadlines, and Submission Guidelines

Dedication to Jack W. Rhodes

Editor’s Introduction — Ada Long

Forum on Honors And Social Justice

Thinking Critically, Acting Justly . — Naomi Yavneh Klos

Making Honors Success Scripts Available to Students from Diverse Backgrounds — Richard Badenhausen

Cultivating Empathy: Lessons from an Interdisciplinary Service-Learning Course — Megan Jacobs and Marygold Walsh-Dilley

Socioeconomic Equity in Honors Education: Increasing Numbers of First-Generation and Low-Income Students — Angela D. Mead

Social Justice Education in Honors: Political but Non-Partisan — Sarita Cargas

Research Essays

What Makes a Curriculum Significant? Tracing the Taxonomy of Significant

Learning in Jesuit Honors Programs — Robert ...


From Campus To Corporation: Using Developmental Assessment Centers To Facilitate Students’ Next Career Steps, Rick R. Jacobs, Kaytlynn R. Griswold, Kristen L. Swigart, Greg E. Loviscky, Rachel L. Heinen Apr 2018

From Campus To Corporation: Using Developmental Assessment Centers To Facilitate Students’ Next Career Steps, Rick R. Jacobs, Kaytlynn R. Griswold, Kristen L. Swigart, Greg E. Loviscky, Rachel L. Heinen

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

introduction

For the things we have to learn before we can do them, we learn by doing them. —Aristotle, The Nicomachean Ethics

Honors graduates have much to learn when transitioning into their first position after college. For instance, workplaces have an entirely different culture and set of expectations from undergraduate honors classrooms (Wendlandt & Rochlen). Furthermore, the skills they need to become successful employees or graduate students are different from those required of successful honors college students, with a greater emphasis on communication skills (Stevens) as one example.

Honors students are bright, curious, and hard-working (Achterberg), and honors programs give them ...


Editor's Introduction (Vol. 9, No. 1), Ada Long Apr 2018

Editor's Introduction (Vol. 9, No. 1), Ada Long

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

Even in these perplexing times, most citizens of the United States would agree that social injustices in this country need to be addressed and alleviated. Most would acknowledge the high rates of poverty, hunger, illiteracy, incarceration, economic inequality, racial discrimination, and bias in college admissions, for instance, that undermine the ideals essential to a thriving democracy. The challenge, though, is getting beneath these abstractions to a level of empathy that can bring about change. While the National Collegiate Honors Council has taken on this challenge in years past, the energy and commitment required to meet the challenge has generally waned ...


Thinking Critically, Acting Justly, Naomi Yavneh Klos Apr 2018

Thinking Critically, Acting Justly, Naomi Yavneh Klos

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

In October 2011, just two months after I became Director of the University Honors Program at Loyola New Orleans, my new home town was simultaneously proclaimed both “America’s Best City for Foodies” (Forbes) and the country’s “Worst Food Desert” (Lammers). The city known for beignets and crawfish, Mardi Gras and jazz, was revealed to have only one supermarket for each 16,000 residents (half the national average), with some residents traveling over fifteen miles from their homes to purchase fresh produce.

In the past six years, the situation has been somewhat ameliorated by multiple farmers markets throughout the ...


How To Drink From The Pierian Spring: A Liberal Arts And Humanities Question About The Limits Of Honors Education, Christopher Keller Apr 2018

How To Drink From The Pierian Spring: A Liberal Arts And Humanities Question About The Limits Of Honors Education, Christopher Keller

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

Honors educators frequently engage in conversations about the decline of interest in and funding for the liberal arts and humanities. Larry Andrews’s essay “The Humanities are Dead! Long Live the Humanities!” is one of several that contributes to a metanarrative about the liberal arts and humanities, playing out along the following lines: workforce-minded politicians, short-sighted university administrators, STEM-related programs, and market-driven students no longer understand the true value of the liberal arts and humanities because they cannot be easily measured in dollars and cents; consequently, higher education today typically narrows students’ perspectives, facilitates short-term and uncritical thinking, and fails ...


Perceptions Of Advisors Who Work With High-Achieving Students, Melissa Johnson, Cheryl Walther, Kelly J. Medley Apr 2018

Perceptions Of Advisors Who Work With High-Achieving Students, Melissa Johnson, Cheryl Walther, Kelly J. Medley

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

Honors programs in higher education are designed to optimize highachieving students’ potential by addressing their particular academic and developmental needs and common characteristics. Gerrity, Lawrence, and Sedlacek suggested that high-achieving students can be “best served by course work, living environments, and activities that differ from the usual college offerings” (43). Schuman, in his handbook Beginning in Honors, noted:

"An important point to keep in mind as regards honors advising is that honors students can be expected to have as many, and as complicated, problems as other students. It is sometimes tempting to envision all honors students as especially well rounded ...


Cultivating Empathy: Lessons From An Interdisciplinary Service-Learning Course, Megan Jacobs, Marygold Walsh-Dilley Apr 2018

Cultivating Empathy: Lessons From An Interdisciplinary Service-Learning Course, Megan Jacobs, Marygold Walsh-Dilley

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

In “Thinking Critically, Acting Justly,” Naomi Yavneh Klos suggests that the key questions for honors education and social justice are first “how to engage our highest-ability and most motivated students in questions of justice” and second “how honors can be a place of access, equity, and excellence in higher education.” These goals are both important and complementary; achieving the latter helps achieve the former. Honors education creates a fruitful space for inclusion where the knowledge and experience of diverse students develop skills oriented toward justice for the whole community. Making honors a place of access and equity prompts deeper engagement ...


Making Honors Success Scripts Available To Students From Diverse Backgrounds, Richard Badenhausen Apr 2018

Making Honors Success Scripts Available To Students From Diverse Backgrounds, Richard Badenhausen

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

In her lead forum essay, Naomi Yavneh Klos thoughtfully encourages us to reexamine our admissions practices in honors. She argues,

"We need a more nuanced reevaluation of standards that recognizes the role of systemic bias in traditional metrics of academic excellence and that holistically evaluates each student’s strengths and challenges in the context of individual and cultural experience. Such practices strengthen honors by identifying a diverse spectrum of students who both benefit from and enrich our honors community. (8)"

I would like to take that call for reevaluation one step further by asking members of the honors community to ...


Social Justice Education In Honors: Political But Non-Partisan, Sarita Cargas Apr 2018

Social Justice Education In Honors: Political But Non-Partisan, Sarita Cargas

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

In Why Are Professors Liberal and Why Do Conservatives Care?, Neil Gross introduces research that suggests fifty to sixty percent of college professors are leftist or liberal, a much higher proportion than the seventeen percent of Americans in general (7). He posits the conservative fear that “bias” in higher education is a “very serious” problem (Gross 5). April Kelly-Woessner and Matthew Woessner examine studies that also show that college students are more ideologically diverse than the professoriate (498) and, further, that students tend to discredit information presented by biased professors and consider them untrustworthy sources (499). If the majority of ...


Editorial Matter: Jnchc 19:1 (Spring/Summer 2018) Apr 2018

Editorial Matter: Jnchc 19:1 (Spring/Summer 2018)

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

Cover

Masthead

Indexing Statement

Production Editors

Editorial Board

Contents

Call for Papers

Editorial Policy

Deadlines

Submission Guidelines

Dedication -- Jack W. Rhodes, The Citadel

Forum on Honors and Social Justice

About the Authors

About the NCHC Monograph Series

NCHC Monographs & Journals

NCHC Publications Order Form

Back cover

ISBN 978-0-9911351-9-6


Socioeconomic Equity In Honors Education: Increasing Numbers Of First-Generation And Low-Income Students, Angela D. Mead Apr 2018

Socioeconomic Equity In Honors Education: Increasing Numbers Of First-Generation And Low-Income Students, Angela D. Mead

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

Many honors administrators can cite the numbers and percentages of students of color and statistics on the male to female ratio. Public institutions might cite in-state to out-of-state comparisons. For most, however, socioeconomic status is low on their list, if there at all, even though it is an important measure of diversity. First-generation college students, neither of whose parents has a baccalaureate degree, make up 58% of college enrollments (Redford & Hoyer). Students with a Pell Grant, which qualifies them as having a low-income background, compose 33% of the American higher education population (Baum et al.). Approximately 24% of college students ...


General Strain Theory And Prescription Drug Misuse Among Honors Students, Jordan Pedalono, Kelly Frailing Apr 2018

General Strain Theory And Prescription Drug Misuse Among Honors Students, Jordan Pedalono, Kelly Frailing

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

Drug overdoses are the leading cause of death for Americans under fifty years of age, having surpassed deaths from guns, HIV, and even car crashes. Clearly driving this trend is prescription drug misuse, especially of opioids. Of the over 62,000 drug overdose deaths in 2016 alone, a full third resulted from the misuse of prescription opioids such as Oxycodone, Hydrocodone, Vicodin, and Morphine (Katz; NIDA; see also DHS). Evidence indicates that college students are among those losing their lives each year to prescription drug misuse (Spencer), but many facets of prescription drug misuse, including types, prevalence, and especially explanations ...


Creating A National Readership For Harper’S Weekly In A Time Of Sectional Crisis, Ashlyn Stewart Apr 2018

Creating A National Readership For Harper’S Weekly In A Time Of Sectional Crisis, Ashlyn Stewart

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

PORTZ-PRIZE-WINNING ESSAY, 2017

Throughout the 1840s and ’50s, localized and specialized periodicals serving specific regions, religions, pastimes, and vocations inundated the American magazine market (Lupfer 249). The vast majority of these publications were short-lived; Heather A. Haveman, a sociologist who in 2015 conducted a quantitative analysis of historical American magazines, estimates that the average lifespan of a magazine between 1840 and 1860 was a mere 1.9 years (29). As book historian Eric Lupfer says, “most were risky ventures— undercapitalized, poorly advertised, haphazardly managed, and with limited circulation” (249). However, magazines with the stability and capital of a sponsoring publishing ...


Linking Academic Excellence And Social Justice Through Community-Based Participatory Research, Lydia Voigt Apr 2018

Linking Academic Excellence And Social Justice Through Community-Based Participatory Research, Lydia Voigt

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

Naomi Yavneh Klos poses two questions for the NCHC community in her essay, “Thinking Critically, Acting Justly,” which appears in this issue of JNCHC: (1) how honors pedagogy/curriculum can engage the highestability and most motivated students in questions of social justice; and (2) how the honors curriculum can serve as a place of access, equity, and excellence in higher education. The University Honors Program (UHP) at Loyola University New Orleans has recently implemented several honors social justice seminars that have been experimenting with various approaches to these pedagogical, curricular, and programmatic questions. Violence and Democracy, an honors sociology/criminology ...


What Makes A Curriculum Significant? Tracing The Taxonomy Of Significant Learning In Jesuit Honors Programs, Robert J. Pampel Apr 2018

What Makes A Curriculum Significant? Tracing The Taxonomy Of Significant Learning In Jesuit Honors Programs, Robert J. Pampel

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

Over the last few years, I have sat in the opening sessions of the National Collegiate Honors Council (NCHC) conference and felt equal parts concern and conviction. In 2015 and 2016, opening speakers enumerated the challenges and opportunities that confront honors educators in a rapidly changing higher education landscape. I sympathized with their concerns in an institutional and cultural context marked by what Schwehn called the “Weberian ethos” of education—an instrumental, and less charitable, attitude toward academic inquiry. Yet, even as I acknowledged the veracity of their arguments, I was buoyed by belief in the Jesuit mission that animates ...


Opportunities For Departmental Strategic Planning: Enhancing The Experience For Incoming Transfer Students In The Department Of Communication, Gabriela Gumucio, Katlin Dunsing, Bethanne Elliott, Rebecca Henderson, Kaylin Lake, Karlie Lower, Alicia Mason Apr 2018

Opportunities For Departmental Strategic Planning: Enhancing The Experience For Incoming Transfer Students In The Department Of Communication, Gabriela Gumucio, Katlin Dunsing, Bethanne Elliott, Rebecca Henderson, Kaylin Lake, Karlie Lower, Alicia Mason

Paper Presentations

The COMM 765: Strategic Planning & Communication Campaigns course conducted research on behalf of the Department of Communications to inform the future 2018-2023 planning and goals for the department. A quantitative survey was designed to examine key stakeholder groups including: faculty, staff, donors, current students and alumni. Each stakeholder group received a unique set of research questions. For example, donors were surveyed to determine their willingness, interest and knowledge of how to support department initiatives through the PSU Foundation; while current students were asked to share their thoughts on the effectiveness of current student organizations, and perceptions toward course developments and availability. All groups were provided with qualitative questions for gathering open-ended feedback. This oral presentation reports the findings from this study.