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Full-Text Articles in Education

Sola Scarab Workers Symposium 2005, Andrew Smith Nov 2005

Sola Scarab Workers Symposium 2005, Andrew Smith

Programs Information: Nebraska State Museum

Entomological Society of America Annual Meeting
Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Sunday, 6 November 2005
Speakers: Andrew Smith, Canadian Museum of Nature; Maxi Polihronakis, University of Connecticut; Matt Paulsen, University of Nebraska-Lincoln; Ainsley Seago, University of California, Berkeley; Sasha Spector, American Museum of Natural History; Dana Price, Rutgers University; Kevina Vulinec, Delaware State University; David Hawks, University of California - Riverside; Frank Hovore, California State University, Northridge


Honors As An Adjective: Response To Jay Freyman, Len Zane Oct 2005

Honors As An Adjective: Response To Jay Freyman, Len Zane

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

As an ex-honors program/college CEO, the question raised by this Forum— ”What is an Honors (fill in the blank)?”—got me reminiscing about the old days. In some sense the best answers are the obviously circular answers. An honors student is a student participating in an honors program. An honors curriculum is the curriculum required to graduate with honors and is made up, obviously, of honors courses. The people teaching those courses are by necessity honors faculty. But how can an honors course be identified? Well, it is one populated by honors students that meets some curricular requirement of ...


Characteristics Of The Contemporary Honors College* A Descriptive Analysis Of A Survey Of Nchc Member Colleges, Peter Sederberg Oct 2005

Characteristics Of The Contemporary Honors College* A Descriptive Analysis Of A Survey Of Nchc Member Colleges, Peter Sederberg

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

Every year the number of honors colleges across the country increases. Most of these new colleges emerge out of pre-existing honors programs, an origin that suggests that the change reflects an interest in raising the public profile of honors education at a particular institution. Sometimes this transformation entails only a cosmetic name change; other times, institutions take the opportunity to review what they are providing in honors education and how they might enhance it.

The Executive Committee of the National Collegiate Honors Council recognized that the NCHC ought to take a strong interest in this phenomenon. If an institution is ...


Teaching Honors, Sam Schuman Oct 2005

Teaching Honors, Sam Schuman

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

Jay Freyman’s discussion of “What is an Honors Student?” sent me off on the somewhat quirky tangent of asking, “So What is an Honors Teacher?” Even quirkier, my musings led me to the conclusion that the best answer was provided by John Lennon and the Beatles: “all you need is love.”


Book Review How To Write A Ba Thesis: A Practical Guide From Your First Ideas To Your Finished Paper (Chicago Guides To Writing, Editing, And Publishing) By Charles Lipson, Hallie Savage Oct 2005

Book Review How To Write A Ba Thesis: A Practical Guide From Your First Ideas To Your Finished Paper (Chicago Guides To Writing, Editing, And Publishing) By Charles Lipson, Hallie Savage

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

A hallmark of honors education is high-quality undergraduate research. For honors faculty and administrators, curricular planning that results in excellent thesis research can be a special challenge because honors students represent a wide range of disciplines and vary in competency and preparation for research. How to Write a BA Thesis meets this challenge. It is a well-developed, practical guidebook for accomplishment of honors and/or undergraduate research. The contents are built on a developmental continuum or time table beginning with the conceptual basis for a thesis. As such, it is applicable to one-semester projects as well as theses or other ...


Is, Ought, And Honors, Daniel Pinti Oct 2005

Is, Ought, And Honors, Daniel Pinti

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

Somewhat uncomfortably, I confess that the question “What is Honors?” rings a bit too Platonic to these ears. I hardly feel qualified to describe “Honors” in terms of its timeless, disembodied, ideal Form, although I suppose the shadows on the wall of my own humble cave are recognizable enough. Honors at Niagara University has as its primary purpose to enrich the academic experience of NU’s most talented students, and we try to do so by weaving coursework and individual research opportunities into each student’s curriculum in order to enhance both the general education and the major programs. We ...


In Praise Of Silence, Bebe Nickolai Oct 2005

In Praise Of Silence, Bebe Nickolai

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

I thought I was ready for her, a sophomore in my honors rhetoric class. I have been teaching the honors rhetoric class for almost twenty years. Yet every semester I revise my syllabus for the class as I realize that honors students can handle even bigger challenges—more difficult readings, more demanding writing assignments.


What Is Honors?, Dail W. Mullins Jr. Oct 2005

What Is Honors?, Dail W. Mullins Jr.

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

For several years I have edited a small, in-house journal for the School of Education’s Technology Advisory Committee at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), a journal which is distributed to the faculty and posted on the School of Education’s website. Until last issue. The last issue I submitted—while dutifully made available to the faculty and staff—never made it onto the website. No one offered an explanation, and I never inquired about the matter—after all, I was still able to add the activity to my already portly and now largely useless post-retirement vita—but ...


A Way Of Life, Sriram Khe Oct 2005

A Way Of Life, Sriram Khe

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

The question “What is Honors?” could not have been posed at a better time for me: earlier this summer, I took up a new responsibility of directing the Western Oregon University (WOU) Honors Program while only in my fourth year at the university. Work has commenced at WOU to prepare for the accreditation process, which is also a wonderful opportunity to think about questions such as “What is Honors?”


Honors: When Value-Added Is Really Added Value, Jacqueline Kelleher Oct 2005

Honors: When Value-Added Is Really Added Value, Jacqueline Kelleher

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

Sometimes I look at the responsibilities and demands placed on me in my current position and cannot believe I haven’t cracked up yet. In this era of accountability and “show me the data,” institutional assessment directors like me are constantly bombarded with challenges that require quick, critical, divergent thinking, analytical reasoning, effective speaking, and, to some extent, creative writing. As both a professor and administrator at a state university, I live and breathe producing evidence that we as an institution are having an impact on student learning. When I was growing up, I never imagined I would end up ...


A Student Like Me, Bonnie D. Irwin Oct 2005

A Student Like Me, Bonnie D. Irwin

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

Jay Freyman suggests that we often define “honors” (and, I suspect, many other things) based on our own experiences and observations as undergraduates. He then provides us with a valuable means of uncovering those diamonds in the rough and shading our eyes from those sparkling cubic zirconia who may have the resumés but lack the drive to take full advantage of the honors experience. This selection process has become even more complicated by the intrusion of parents who act as brokers for their students and who, despite our best efforts to thwart them, sometimes overshadow the stellar qualifications of their ...


What Honors Students Want (And Expect): The Views Of Top Michigan High School And College Students, James P. Hill Oct 2005

What Honors Students Want (And Expect): The Views Of Top Michigan High School And College Students, James P. Hill

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

Often missing in an overall assessment of honors is a broad, comparative analysis of what top academic students want and expect from college and more particularly from an honors experience. Limited case studies or theoretical research articles analyzing how honors students think or perform may overlook or undervalue this important voice in the honors discourse. This article, although in some respects also just a larger-scale case study, has a broader perspective than many similar studies of honors students. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the expectations of prospective and current college honors students. This study also compares the ...


Redemptive Memory: The Christianization Of The Holocaust In America, Laura Bender Herron Oct 2005

Redemptive Memory: The Christianization Of The Holocaust In America, Laura Bender Herron

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

There has been a considerable debate among historians concerning the role of the Holocaust in the American collective memory. Since the watershed year 1993, when the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum opened its doors on the Mall in Washington, DC, and the film Schindler’s List debuted, the level of awareness of the Holocaust in the public mind has been at an all-time high in the United States. The question at the heart of this academic discussion is how Americans have come to identify so strongly with an experience that occurred over sixty years ago, on foreign shores, to a ...


Comparison Of The Academic Achievement Of First-Year Female Honors Program And Non-Honors Program Engineering Students, Gayle Hartleroad Oct 2005

Comparison Of The Academic Achievement Of First-Year Female Honors Program And Non-Honors Program Engineering Students, Gayle Hartleroad

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

The purpose of this study was to compare the academic achievement of first-year female engineering students based on participation, or lack thereof, in the honors program. A single research question was developed for this study: “Is there a significant difference in academic achievement of first-year female engineering Honors Program students and non-honors program students?” The problem for this study was that many students in the Freshman Engineering program at Purdue University believed that participation in an honors program damaged students’ grade point averages with its challenging curriculum. This was especially true for beginning female students entering a traditionally male-dominated career ...


“What Is An Honors Student?”, Jay Freyman Oct 2005

“What Is An Honors Student?”, Jay Freyman

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

It is first necessary to recognize the distinction between the questions “What is an honors student?” or better “What are the characteristics of an honors student?” and “How do you recognize a student with those characteristics?” The first of these two questions is easier to approach since it is more a matter of prescription than of description, a presentation of an ideal rather than a recognition of an actual state. We can all list characteristics which we would like or expect those special students to have who are worthy in our estimation of the designation “honors.” These expectations, I submit ...


Editorial Matter For Volume 6, Number 2, Ada Long, Dail Mullins Oct 2005

Editorial Matter For Volume 6, Number 2, Ada Long, Dail Mullins

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

Editorial Policy
Contents
Call for Papers
Submission Guidelines
Dedication to Jocelyn E. Whitehead Jackson
Editor's Introduction, Ada Long
About the Authors


Journal Of The National Collegiate Honors Council -- Volume 6, No. 2 -- Complete Issue Oct 2005

Journal Of The National Collegiate Honors Council -- Volume 6, No. 2 -- Complete Issue

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

CONTENTS

Call for Papers
Submission Guidelines
Dedication to Jocelyn E. Whitehead Jackson
Editor’s Introduction -- Ada Long

FORUM ON “WHAT IS HONORS?”
What is Honors? -- Dail W. Mullins, Jr.
What is an Honors Student? -- Jay Freyman
Teaching Honors -- Sam Schuman
Honors as an Adjective: Response to Jay Freyman -- Len Zane
What Honors Can Do -- Vince Brewton
Is, Ought, and Honors -- Daniel Pinti
A Way of Life -- Sriram Khé
In Praise of Silence -- Bebe Nickolai
A Student like Me -- Bonnie D. Irwin
Honors: When Value-Added is Really Added Value -- Jacqueline P. Kelleher

PORTZ-PRIZE-WINNING ESSAY, 2005
Redemptive Memory: The Christianization of the ...


Pod Network News, Fall 2005 Oct 2005

Pod Network News, Fall 2005

POD Network News

No abstract provided.


The Role Of The College Campus Environment And The Racial Identity Development Of Biracial College Students, Natasha H. Chapman Jul 2005

The Role Of The College Campus Environment And The Racial Identity Development Of Biracial College Students, Natasha H. Chapman

Educational Administration: Theses, Dissertations, and Student Research

The purpose o f this study was to explore how biracial students described the role of the college campus environment on the development of their racial identity. The research questions were: 1) What is the biracial student’s self-assigned racial identity? 2) What life experiences have aided in the formation of the biracial individual’s racial identity? 3) How has the college experience contributed to the development o f the biracial individual’s racial identity? 4) What key factors in the campus environment were most salient to biracial college students in the development of their racial identity? 5) How do ...


Policy For Responding To Allegations Of Research Misconduct -- Withdrawn Jun 2005

Policy For Responding To Allegations Of Research Misconduct -- Withdrawn

Policies and Guidelines of Research Compliance Services

***SUPERCEDED***

Please refer to current policies at http://research.unl.edu/researchcompliance/research-misconduct-policies-and-procedures/


Athena, Telemachus, And The Honors Student Odyssey: The Academic Librarian As An Agent In Mentored Learning, Emily Walshe Apr 2005

Athena, Telemachus, And The Honors Student Odyssey: The Academic Librarian As An Agent In Mentored Learning, Emily Walshe

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

This study considers how librarians can develop mentoring schemes that enhance intellectual discourse among honors students. The author defines mentored learning; identifies the need for integrated information support in honors curricula; outlines a project that has employed a mentored learning model; and examines how a mentored learning program may assist in promoting high achievement and low attrition in honors programs. This paper was presented at the 39th annual NCHC conference in November 2004.


Intimations Of Imitation: Honors Students And Their Alps, Jeffrey Portnoy Apr 2005

Intimations Of Imitation: Honors Students And Their Alps, Jeffrey Portnoy

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

Joan Digby’s “The Age of Imitation” reads like Joan herself: shrewd, provocative, and astute in her observations. I found her remarks compelling on both the personal and professional level as I think about the current generation of students and the society in which we move.


The Hopes And Fears Of Post-9/11 Years, Mel Piehl Apr 2005

The Hopes And Fears Of Post-9/11 Years, Mel Piehl

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

In 1998 Arthur Levine and Jeannette Cureton wrote in When Hope and Fear Collide: A Portrait of Today’s College Student that the current college generation they had studied was “wearied by the enormous pressure they face economically, politically, socially, and psychologically. At the same time, they are energized by a desire to enjoy the good life and make their corner of the world a better place. This is a generation in which hope and fear are colliding” (17).


What Honors Students Are Like Now, Rosalie Otero Apr 2005

What Honors Students Are Like Now, Rosalie Otero

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

I recently received a letter from one of our Honors alumnae. Zoë wrote: “I’m doing it again! I’ve decided to run another marathon in support of the Leukemia Society of America in Anchorage, Alaska. Five years ago, I undertook a great challenge when I successfully completed the marathon in San Diego, running 26.2 miles in just over 4 1/2 hours. Although training in Alaska has proved challenging–getting up in the dark to confront freezing temperatures, snow and ice, while trying to avoid running into moose (which, believe it or not, happens often), the challenges that ...


Seeing Nature: Ansel Adams In The Human And Natural Environments Of Yosemite, Megan Mcwenie Apr 2005

Seeing Nature: Ansel Adams In The Human And Natural Environments Of Yosemite, Megan Mcwenie

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

Wallace Stegner once hailed the legacy of Ansel Adams as bringing photography to the world of art as a unique “way of seeing.” What Adams saw through the lens of his camera, and what audiences see when looking at one of his photographs, does indeed constitute a particular way of seeing the world, a vision that is almost always connected to the natural environment. An Ansel Adams photograph evokes more than an aesthetic response to his work—it also stirs reflections about his involvement in the natural world that was so often his subject. Audiences experiencing his work participate in ...


Imitation, Economic Insecurity, And Risk Aversion, Jay Mandt Apr 2005

Imitation, Economic Insecurity, And Risk Aversion, Jay Mandt

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

There is an ingrained notion in American culture that individuals are responsible for their circumstances. In the Great Depression, people blamed themselves for unemployment, as if somehow their personal character flaws, rather than a breakdown of the national economy, had caused them to be laid off. At a visceral level, Americans reject the idea that they are in the grip of vast forces beyond their control.


Originality Is A Risk, Annmarie Guzy Apr 2005

Originality Is A Risk, Annmarie Guzy

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

I am a teacher of composition and technical communication by vocation, but one avocation of mine is horror, and I occasionally teach a class on horror literature and film. If one is taking films to task for endless, derivative sequels and remakes, as Joan does, then horror is certainly no exception. Many people view the genre with another kind of distaste, decrying its graphic representations of violence and sexuality. Horror is messy and dangerous, and it sends the message that risky behavior is punished with death or worse.


Editorial Matter For Volume 6, Number 1, Ada Long, Dail Mullins Apr 2005

Editorial Matter For Volume 6, Number 1, Ada Long, Dail Mullins

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

Editorial Policy
Contents
Call for Papers
Submission Guidelines
Dedication to Faith Gabelnick
Editor's Introduction, Ada Long
About the Authors


The Age Of Imitation, Joan Digby Apr 2005

The Age Of Imitation, Joan Digby

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

In recent years I’ve been somewhat perplexed to discover that my honors freshman literature classes are far more receptive to Pope’s “Essay on Man” than Coleridge’s “Kubla Khan.” Through most of my teaching career, the reverse was the norm, but a number of changes in popular taste have led students away from Romantic originality and led me to these reflections on contemporary culture which may, I hope, have some wider implications with respect to current issues in teaching and learning.


Responsibility And Imitation, Michael K. Cundall Jr. Apr 2005

Responsibility And Imitation, Michael K. Cundall Jr.

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

In my discipline there are typically two kinds of reviews. The first is sharply critical of the author’s conclusions, argumentative techniques, and overall style. The second usually involves a brief summary of the author’s points and then goes on to engage the project in a variety of ways: some critical, some conciliatory. I choose to adopt the latter form as it seems that Digby brings to the fore issues that should concern educators in Honors.