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Higher Education Administration

Series

2001

Programs Information: Nebraska State Museum

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Education

Sola Scarab Workers Symposium 2001, Andrew Smith Dec 2001

Sola Scarab Workers Symposium 2001, Andrew Smith

Programs Information: Nebraska State Museum

Entomological Society of America Annual Meeting
San Diego, California
Sunday, 9 December 2001

SPEAKERS:
Unusual scarab biology and biologists I have known. Henry Howden Scarabaeidae et al. in Honduras. Ronald D. Cave
The pleocomid rain beetles of western North America: tales of an enigmatic scarab group. Andrew Smith
The continuing scarabaeoid higher phylogeny debate: recent evidence from ribosomal DNA. David C. Hawks and John M. Heraty
Dascillidae and Scarabaeoidea: are they closely related? Vasily V. Grebennikov and Clarke H. Scholtz
Review of Central American Astaena (Sericini). Paul Lago
The Internet guide to New World scarabs: progress and prospects. Mary Liz ...


Aquatic Plants Of Nebraska, Michael P. Gutzmer, Robert B. Kaul Jan 2001

Aquatic Plants Of Nebraska, Michael P. Gutzmer, Robert B. Kaul

Programs Information: Nebraska State Museum

More than 100 species of aquatic plants grow in Nebraska. Some are entirely submersed for their whole lives, others produce floating leaves and flowers, and still others stand upright, with only their lower stems in water. Examples of these are shown here in this publication.

Vigorous and diverse colonies of aquatic plants are usually a sign of healthy and stable aquatic environments. In fact, the plants themselves stabilize the shorelines, underwater soils, and water chemistry. Waters rich with aquatic plants are rich with aquatic animals and waterfowl, which find cover, breeding habitat, and abundant food. Non-alkaline waters have more aquatic ...


Something To Sneeze At: Nebraska's Airborne Pollen, Margaret R. Bolick Jan 2001

Something To Sneeze At: Nebraska's Airborne Pollen, Margaret R. Bolick

Programs Information: Nebraska State Museum

For those of us whose noses know (and don't like) pollen, late October is a time for celebration in Nebraska because it is the end of the hay fever season. When one's nose is a sensitive bio-detector of the presence of pollen, one's brain usually appreciates putting a name to whatever is causing the itchy eyes and runny nose. The job of putting names on the types of pollen in the air has been done by a dedicated team of pollen counters in the Division of Botany, University of Nebraska State Museum. This group, led by Curator ...