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Full-Text Articles in Education

Becoming A Multicultural Faculty Developer: Reflections From The Field, Diana Kardia Jan 1998

Becoming A Multicultural Faculty Developer: Reflections From The Field, Diana Kardia

To Improve the Academy

There has been a significant amount of activity in the area of multicultural faculty development; yet, this is an area where our profession continues to require growth and attention. Many faculty development practitioners are in a unique position to work with multicultural issues but need additional knowledge, strategies, and skills to do this work well. By attending to the specific challenges and areas of expansion needed for faculty developers to work with diverse institutions, we can increase the effectiveness of our work while continuing to actualize the potential of our profession.


Academic Morphing: Teaching Assistant To Faculty Member, Kathleen S. Smith, Patricia L. Kalivoda Jan 1998

Academic Morphing: Teaching Assistant To Faculty Member, Kathleen S. Smith, Patricia L. Kalivoda

To Improve the Academy

This paper discusses the process by which graduate teaching assistants (TAs), participating in a longitudinal study, used their graduate TA experience to successfully survive the transition from being a teaching assistant to becoming a faculty member. A theoretical framework is presented that describes how individual characteristics of the TAs worked together with disciplinary, institutional, and departmental forces to shape a set of professional values. These professional values helped to form strategies for success: one set used for securing the first faculty position and the other set used to balance professional roles during the first year as a faculty member. These ...


Divining The Future For Faculty Development: Five Hopeful Signs And One Caveat, Marilla D. Svinicki Jan 1998

Divining The Future For Faculty Development: Five Hopeful Signs And One Caveat, Marilla D. Svinicki

To Improve the Academy

The fortunes of faculty development centers rise and fall on the waves of change that roll through postsecondary education on a regular basis. These waves can swamp us, or we can ride their crest. This article points out some of the waves the author sees now and in the immediate future and how we can benefit from them. She ends with a caution about improving our chances of survival through our own efforts rather than waiting for someone else to draw us along.


Implications Of The Nature Of "Expertise" For Teaching And Faculty Development, Richard G. Tiberius, Ronald A. Smith, Zohar Waisman Jan 1998

Implications Of The Nature Of "Expertise" For Teaching And Faculty Development, Richard G. Tiberius, Ronald A. Smith, Zohar Waisman

To Improve the Academy

Over the last two decades cognitive theorists have learned that the development of expertise goes beyond the accumulation of knowledge and skills: expertise includes the development of pattern recognition and learned procedures that enable practitioners to deal with problems effortlessly or intuitively. Even more recently, theorists are distinguishing experts from experienced non-experts by how they use the bonus time and energy gained from solving problems intuitively. Experts invest it in tackling problems that increase their expertise rather than reduce problems to previously learned routines. Some implications of these different views of expertise for teaching and faculty development are discussed.


Teaching Large Classes: Unpacking The Problem And Responding Creatively, Elisa Carbone, James Greenberg Jan 1998

Teaching Large Classes: Unpacking The Problem And Responding Creatively, Elisa Carbone, James Greenberg

To Improve the Academy

Teaching large classes well is a continuing challenge for many universities. This article looks at one university's systematic approach to the problem. It describes how faculty and administrators from all over campus were involved in a Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) process, how the problems were clearly defined and recommendations made, and how the solutions that emerged also involved faculty from across the curriculum.


Planning Multicultural Audits In Higher Education, Mark A. Chesler Jan 1998

Planning Multicultural Audits In Higher Education, Mark A. Chesler

To Improve the Academy

Colleges and universities are struggling with issues of diversity and multiculturalism-in classrooms, social interactions, staff relations, admissions and hiring processes, and overall campus climate. As part of organizational change efforts, many institutions are calling on faculty development offices to help plan, staff, and implement cultural audits or assessments. This article suggests tested procedures for designing and carrying out such audits, with examples of specific data-gathering techniques (and in some cases evidence) from various institutions. Cultural audits will be most successful, accurate, and useful when these procedures are considered carefully and built into the audit design at the beginning.


Editorial Matter 1998 Jan 1998

Editorial Matter 1998

To Improve the Academy

Ordering Information

Permission to Copy

Instructions to Contributors for the 1999 Volume

Reviewers for the 1998 Volume

Mission Statement

Membership, Conference, and Programs Information

Contents

Foreword, by Matthew Kaplan

Introduction, by Matthew Kaplan

About POD


Using The Sgid Method For A Variety Of Purposes, Beverly Black Jan 1998

Using The Sgid Method For A Variety Of Purposes, Beverly Black

To Improve the Academy

The Small Group Instructional Diagnosis (SGID) process (Redmond & Clark, 1982) has been used for consultation purposes at the Center for Research on Learning and Teaching at the University of Michigan since 1990. Since then it has become a multi-purpose tool with far-reaching results. This article describes a variety of ways we have used this process: to provide feedback to individual faculty and teaching assistants on their teaching, to inform coordinators of large multi-sectioned courses on how the course is working as a whole, to inform coordinators of TA training on the effectiveness of their programs, to advocate for better classroom ...


The Role Of Educational Developers In Institutional Change: From The Basement Office To The Front Office, Nancy Van Note Chism Jan 1998

The Role Of Educational Developers In Institutional Change: From The Basement Office To The Front Office, Nancy Van Note Chism

To Improve the Academy

Educational developers can play a crucial role in helping colleges and universities respond to change. Among the roles they can play are researcher, assessment resource, friendly critic, messenger, translator, and coach. To perform these roles, developers need certain characteristics and special knowledge bases as well as enabling conditions within their environment. The current state of higher education may be calling for a paradigm shift in educational development as well.


Supporting Faculty Development In An Era Of Change, Carol Fulton, Barbara L. Licklider Jan 1998

Supporting Faculty Development In An Era Of Change, Carol Fulton, Barbara L. Licklider

To Improve the Academy

A paradigm shift is underway in higher education. Realizing the hoped-for gains of new student-centered approaches will require significantly different approaches to faculty development. This paper describes one such approach to faculty development and how it is currently being used to improve the learning and teaching experience in the College of Engineering at a land grant institution in the Midwest. Considerations for the widespread application of this approach are also offered.


Developments In Initial Training And Certification Of University Teachers In The Uk: Implications For The Us, Graham Gibbs Jan 1998

Developments In Initial Training And Certification Of University Teachers In The Uk: Implications For The Us, Graham Gibbs

To Improve the Academy

Initial training of university teachers is developing in a different direction in the UK than in the US. It concentrates on tenure-track faculty rather than on TAs, on course design rather than on classroom practice, and is much more extensive. This paper contrasts UK and US faculty development practices and their implications. It describes two recent developments in the UK: the establishment of national certification of university teachers and the development of a national course for new faculty to help institutions meet the requirements of certification. The potential for similar mechanisms operating in the US is explored.


Statements Of Teaching Philosophy, Gail E. Goodyear, Douglas Allchin Jan 1998

Statements Of Teaching Philosophy, Gail E. Goodyear, Douglas Allchin

To Improve the Academy

Well-defined teaching philosophy is essential to creating and maintaining a campus culture supportive of teaching. Presented in this paper are reasons for statements of teaching philosophy as well as descriptions of how the statements are beneficial to students, faculty, and university administrations. Described are ways of creating a statement of teaching philosophy and dimensions that may be included in such statements. This article begins a discussion of roles, composition, and evaluation of statements of teaching philosophy.


Holistic Faculty Development: Supporting Personal, Professional, And Organizational Well-Being, Glenda T. Hubbard, Sally S. Atkins, Kathleen T. Brinko Jan 1998

Holistic Faculty Development: Supporting Personal, Professional, And Organizational Well-Being, Glenda T. Hubbard, Sally S. Atkins, Kathleen T. Brinko

To Improve the Academy

In recent years, higher education has begun to realize the great influence that faculty quality of life has on student learning and on overall institutional effectiveness. This article examines the interactive effect of personal, professional, and organizational well-being and describes a center that integrates four kinds of services-faculty development, employee assistance, health promotion, and organizational development-that work both separately and collaboratively. The result is a synergistic organization that is able to tackle complex institutional problems that could not be addressed by any one program alone.


An O.P.E.N. Approach To Learning, Keith Kelly, Roberta C. Teahen Jan 1998

An O.P.E.N. Approach To Learning, Keith Kelly, Roberta C. Teahen

To Improve the Academy

O.P.E.N. Learning, an open-entry, open-exit delivery system that is supported by a computerized instructional management system and an extensive learning team, is a fundamental restructuring of the approach to education. This article summarizes the rationale for eliminating the traditional calendar by framing an educational system around a performance-based approach.


Faculty Development In Technology Applications To University Instruction: An Evaluation, Margie K. Kitano, Bernard J. Dodge, Patrick J. Harrison, Rena B. Lewis Jan 1998

Faculty Development In Technology Applications To University Instruction: An Evaluation, Margie K. Kitano, Bernard J. Dodge, Patrick J. Harrison, Rena B. Lewis

To Improve the Academy

Progress in integrating new technologies into higher education classrooms has been slow despite emerging evidence on benefits for students when technologies are applied in ways that support teaching and learning. This article describes a program used by a college of education to support faculty applications of technology in instruction and reports results of a formal evaluation following the first year of implementation. The program provided intensive training and follow-up support to a heterogeneous cohort of 14 faculty members and was designed to enhance their ability to integrate technology into their teaching, use a new "smart" classroom facility, and/or develop ...


A Case Study In Getting Faculty To Change, Joan K. Middendorf Jan 1998

A Case Study In Getting Faculty To Change, Joan K. Middendorf

To Improve the Academy

Academic support professionals have a lot to share with faculty, but it is our special challenge that faculty do not always welcome our help. We can achieve greater success and suffer less frustration by understanding some principles about the process of change. This article offers four principles of implementing change and illustrates their application to a project. If academic support professionals prepare to offset resistance, model a vision of success, involve key people, and match strategies to the stages faculty move through in accepting a change, we can enhance adoption of new approaches.


Minimizing Error When Developing Questionnaires, Terrie Nolinske Jan 1998

Minimizing Error When Developing Questionnaires, Terrie Nolinske

To Improve the Academy

Questionnaires are used by faculty developers, administrators, faculty, and students in higher education to assess need, conduct research, and evaluate teaching or learning. While used often, questionnaires may be the most misused method of collecting information, due to the potential for sampling error and nonsampling error, which includes questionnaire design, sample selection, nonresponse, wording, social desirability, recall, format, order, and context effects. This article offers methods and strategies to minimize these errors during questionnaire development, discusses the importance of pilot-testing questionnaires, and underscores the importance of an ethical approach to the process. Examples relevant to higher education illustrate key points.


Faculty Developers As Change Agents: Transforming Colleges And Universities Into Learning Organizations, Sondra K. Patrick, James J. Fletcher Jan 1998

Faculty Developers As Change Agents: Transforming Colleges And Universities Into Learning Organizations, Sondra K. Patrick, James J. Fletcher

To Improve the Academy

In the face of demands for institutional restructuring and competition from new internet-based degree programs, the authors argue that campus-based colleges and universities may continue to serve their students well by becoming effective learning organizations. They argue, further, that faculty developers are in the best position to help their institutions become learning organizations. After describing the features of learning organizations as articulated in the work of Peter Senge, the authors reinterpret Senge 's theory to make specific application to academic settings. Concrete suggestions are provided for faculty developers to assist in transforming their institutions.


Section I: Changing Roles For Faculty Developers Jan 1998

Section I: Changing Roles For Faculty Developers

To Improve the Academy

No abstract provided.


Section Ii: Working With Faculty At Different Career Stages Jan 1998

Section Ii: Working With Faculty At Different Career Stages

To Improve the Academy

No abstract provided.


Section Iii: Fostering Organizational Change And Development Jan 1998

Section Iii: Fostering Organizational Change And Development

To Improve the Academy

No abstract provided.


Section Iv: Reexamining Approaches To Instruction And Instructional Development Jan 1998

Section Iv: Reexamining Approaches To Instruction And Instructional Development

To Improve the Academy

No abstract provided.


Adopting A Strategic Approach To Managing Change In Learning And Teaching, Brenda Smith Jan 1998

Adopting A Strategic Approach To Managing Change In Learning And Teaching, Brenda Smith

To Improve the Academy

Universities are having to become more accountable for the quality of the student learning experience. This is taking place in a climate of expanding student numbers, a greater diversity of students, and reduced resources. How then do we motivate faculty, take on board new initiatives, reflect on current practice, and at the same time provide an organizational structure that is supportive and visionary? This article illustrates how a major externally funded project on peer observation led to a change in university culture and facilitated a major structural change to the organization that supports the ongoing development and enhancement of learning ...


The Impact Of Comprehensive Institutional Assessment On Faculty, Tracey Sutherland, James Guffey Jan 1997

The Impact Of Comprehensive Institutional Assessment On Faculty, Tracey Sutherland, James Guffey

To Improve the Academy

In this age of accountability, colleges and universities are being called on to provide evidence of their effectiveness. As a result, comprehensive assessment initiatives are being implemented on most campuses, requiring increasing numbers of faculty to become involved. Beginning with an overview of a faculty-driven assessment model, this article describes specific roles faculty play and the results of a study in which faculty describe how their involvement influences their teaching and professional development. The primary purpose of faculty development is to improve the learning environment. Faculty participation in institutional assessment efforts enhances that environment. The results of the study provide ...


Implementing Peer Review Programs: A Twelve Step Model, Jamie Webb, Kathleen Mcenerney Jan 1997

Implementing Peer Review Programs: A Twelve Step Model, Jamie Webb, Kathleen Mcenerney

To Improve the Academy

Nationally, universities and colleges are expressing increased interest in peer review of teaching in response to public calls for accountability from academe. Further motivation comes from within campuses themselves as they respond to an increasingly non-traditional student body. Based on our experience with a peer observation program at California State University-Dominguez Hills, we identified twelve steps for planning and implementing a peer review process. In this article we discuss each of the twelve steps, presenting a rationale and sharing our experiences.


University Professors At Mid-Life: Being A Part Of ... But Feeling Apart, Irene E. Karpiak Jan 1997

University Professors At Mid-Life: Being A Part Of ... But Feeling Apart, Irene E. Karpiak

To Improve the Academy

This article explores the experiences of mid-career and older faculty members in higher education through a qualitative study of 20 associate professors (15 men and 5 women) between the ages of 41 and 59 at a Canadian university. In non-directive interviews, "graying" professors discussed their satisfactions and struggles, not only in relation to their students and their academic work, but also in relation to the whole university and its administration. An emergent schema is presented that identifies four attitudes characteristic of this group of professors: Meaning, Malaise, Marginality, and Mattering.


A Global Faculty Development Network: The International Consortium For Educational Development (Iced), Karron G. Lewis, Eric Kristensen Jan 1997

A Global Faculty Development Network: The International Consortium For Educational Development (Iced), Karron G. Lewis, Eric Kristensen

To Improve the Academy

Although higher education systems around the world differ considerably in structure and the methods used in teaching, there is universal concern for the quality of undergraduate teaching and learning. Thus, faculty and educational development activities are a worldwide phenomena. In 1993, The International Consortium for Educational Development (ICED) was born to facilitate exchange of faculty and educational development information. This article looks at the history of ICED and the accomplishments of this organization since its inception. We look at examples of faculty development work in Sweden, Australia and Finland and consider the implications these international programs might have for faculty ...


Incorporating Theories Of Teacher Growth And Adult Education In A Faculty Development Program, Alenoush Saroyan, Cheryl Amundsen, Cao Li Jan 1997

Incorporating Theories Of Teacher Growth And Adult Education In A Faculty Development Program, Alenoush Saroyan, Cheryl Amundsen, Cao Li

To Improve the Academy

This paper describes a theory-based faculty development program and provides preliminary evidence as to its effectiveness in promoting change in thinking about teaching. The program design was based on Ramsden's (1992) theory of teacher growth and Mezirow's (1991) transformative theory in adult education. The program was offered as a three-credit course to graduate students and as a week-long (40 hours) workshop to faculty. Assessment included responses to pre- post- questions about participants' views from teaching. Results indicate that both groups changed their focus from viewing teaching as transmitting knowledge to a more integrated and complex conception of teaching.


Long-Term Patterns In A Mentoring Program For Junior Faculty: Recommendations For Practice, Milton D. Cox Jan 1997

Long-Term Patterns In A Mentoring Program For Junior Faculty: Recommendations For Practice, Milton D. Cox

To Improve the Academy

Faculty developers believe mentoring programs are beneficial for new and junior faculty. Although there are reports on the early years of these programs, few have existed for more than 15 years. This article reports on a junior faculty program in place for 18 years with the same goals, format, and activities. The endurance of its mentoring component, with continuing support of faculty, former mentors and protégés, and administrators, is a measure of its success. Mentoring patterns relative to gender, mentor repetition, protégés who later mentor, and multidisciplinarity within pairings may be of assistance and encouragement to anyone initiating or continuing ...


Faculty Development And The Inclusion Of Diversity In The College Classroom: Pedagogical And Curricular Transformation, James A. Anderson Jan 1997

Faculty Development And The Inclusion Of Diversity In The College Classroom: Pedagogical And Curricular Transformation, James A. Anderson

To Improve the Academy

Colleges and universities are confronted with a plethora of questions and concerns that are associated with the inclusion and success of diverse student populations. Especially critical is the role that faculty will play in fostering a supportive and effective learning environment which benefits the wide range of racial, cultural, gender, and class groups. Faculty development activities can assist faculty to make their courses more inclusive both in content and in pedagogy. Those who direct teaching excellence and faculty development efforts must be more proactive as they impact faculty attitudes toward diversity.