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Higher Education Administration

John D. Foubert

Bystander Intervention

Publication Year

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Education

The Men’S Program: Does It Impact College Men’S Bystander Efficacy And Willingness To Intervene?, Jennifer Langhinrichsen-Rohling, John D. Foubert, Brent Hill, Hope Brasfield, Shannon Shelley-Tremblay Dec 2010

The Men’S Program: Does It Impact College Men’S Bystander Efficacy And Willingness To Intervene?, Jennifer Langhinrichsen-Rohling, John D. Foubert, Brent Hill, Hope Brasfield, Shannon Shelley-Tremblay

John D. Foubert

This study considered whether a rape prevention program could reduce men’s rape myth acceptance, enhance the perceived effectiveness of college men’s bystander behavior, and increase men’s willingness to intervene as bystanders in potentially dangerous situations. As predicted, college men who experienced The Men’s Program significantly increased their self-reported willingness to help as a bystander and their perceived bystander efficacy in comparison to college men who experienced the comparison condition. Men’s Program participants also significantly decreased their self-reported rape myth acceptance in comparison with comparison condition participants. The college policy and rape prevention program planning implications ...


In Their Own Words: Sophomore College Men Describe Attitude And Behavior Changes Resulting From A Rape Prevention Program Two Years After Their Participation., John D. Foubert, Eric Godin, Jerry Tatum Dec 2009

In Their Own Words: Sophomore College Men Describe Attitude And Behavior Changes Resulting From A Rape Prevention Program Two Years After Their Participation., John D. Foubert, Eric Godin, Jerry Tatum

John D. Foubert

The study conducted involved assessing students from a Southeastern public university during two academic years, after their participation in an all-male sexual assault peer education program. The study findings revealed that 79% of 184 college men reported attitude change, behavior change, or both. Furthermore, a multistage inductive analysis revealed that after seeing The Men’s Program, men intervened to prevent rapes from happening. Participants also modified their behavior to avoid committing sexual assault when they or a potential partner were under the influence of alcohol. Implications for future research were discussed.


Effects Of A Rape Awareness Program On College Women: Increasing Bystander Efficacy And Willingness To Intervene., John D. Foubert, Jennifer Langhinrichsen-Rohling Dec 2009

Effects Of A Rape Awareness Program On College Women: Increasing Bystander Efficacy And Willingness To Intervene., John D. Foubert, Jennifer Langhinrichsen-Rohling

John D. Foubert

An experimental study evaluated the efficacy of a sexual assault riskr eduction program on 279 college women that focused on learning characteristics of male perpetrators and teaching bystander intervention techniques. After seeing The Women’s Program, participants reported significantly greater bystander efficacy and significantly greater willingness to help than before seeing the program. Participants outperformed a control group. Rape myth acceptance also declined among program participants. Implications for rape awareness programming are discussed.