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Higher Education Administration

Selected Works

Rape Prevention

Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Education

Answering The Questions Of Rape Prevention Research: A Response To Tharp Et Al. (2011), John D. Foubert Dec 2010

Answering The Questions Of Rape Prevention Research: A Response To Tharp Et Al. (2011), John D. Foubert

John D. Foubert

Rape prevention programmers and researchers have long struggled to select the most appropriate theoretical models to frame their work. Questions abound regarding appropriate standards of evidence for success of program interventions. The present article provides an alternative point of view to the one put forward by seven staff members from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Tharp et al., 2011). Questions are posed for readers to consider regarding the appropriateness of the medical model for rape prevention programs, whether randomized control trials are the one and only gold standard, whether programs presented to groups should be evaluated ...


In Their Own Words: Sophomore College Men Describe Attitude And Behavior Changes Resulting From A Rape Prevention Program Two Years After Their Participation., John D. Foubert, Eric Godin, Jerry Tatum Dec 2009

In Their Own Words: Sophomore College Men Describe Attitude And Behavior Changes Resulting From A Rape Prevention Program Two Years After Their Participation., John D. Foubert, Eric Godin, Jerry Tatum

John D. Foubert

The study conducted involved assessing students from a Southeastern public university during two academic years, after their participation in an all-male sexual assault peer education program. The study findings revealed that 79% of 184 college men reported attitude change, behavior change, or both. Furthermore, a multistage inductive analysis revealed that after seeing The Men’s Program, men intervened to prevent rapes from happening. Participants also modified their behavior to avoid committing sexual assault when they or a potential partner were under the influence of alcohol. Implications for future research were discussed.


Reactions Of Men Of Color To A Commonly Used Rape Prevention Program: Attitude And Predicted Behavior Changes, John D. Foubert, Brandynne J. Cremedy Dec 2006

Reactions Of Men Of Color To A Commonly Used Rape Prevention Program: Attitude And Predicted Behavior Changes, John D. Foubert, Brandynne J. Cremedy

John D. Foubert

African American, Latino, and Asian first-year college men (36) saw The Men’s Program, an all-male rape prevention workshop, and wrote answers to four open ended questions to determine how men from non-white groups react to a commonly used rape prevention program. Using a multi-stage inductive analysis, participant responses fell into five main themes including reinforced current beliefs and/or no changes, increased awareness of rape and its effects on survivors, increased understanding of consent, plans to intervene if a rape might occur, and plans to change behavior in their own intimate situations. Participants mentioned specific ways in which they ...


Effects Of Two Versions Of An Empathy-Based Rape Prevention Program On Fraternity Men’S Rape Survivor Empathy, Rape Myth Acceptance, Likelihood Of Raping, And Likelihood Of Committing Sexual Assault., John D. Foubert, J. T. Newberry Dec 2005

Effects Of Two Versions Of An Empathy-Based Rape Prevention Program On Fraternity Men’S Rape Survivor Empathy, Rape Myth Acceptance, Likelihood Of Raping, And Likelihood Of Committing Sexual Assault., John D. Foubert, J. T. Newberry

John D. Foubert

Fraternity men (N = 261) at a small to midsized public university saw one of two versions of a rape prevention program or were in a control group. Program participants reported significant increases in empathy toward rape survivors and significant declines in rape myth acceptance, likelihood of raping, and likelihood of committing sexual assault. Program participants’ scores significantly differed from an untreated control group in several areas. Implications for describing a male-on-male rape to increase men’s empathy toward female survivors and other related attitudes are discussed.


The Longitudinal Effects Of A Rape-Prevention Program On Fraternity Men’S Attitudes, Behavioral Intent, And Behavior, John D. Foubert Dec 1999

The Longitudinal Effects Of A Rape-Prevention Program On Fraternity Men’S Attitudes, Behavioral Intent, And Behavior, John D. Foubert

John D. Foubert

A longitudinal study showed that fraternity men who saw The Men's Program reported lower rape myth acceptance and lower likelihood of raping 7 months after program participants relative to a control group using a Solomon 4 design.


Effects Of A Sexual Assault Peer Education Program On Men's Belief In Rape Myths., John D. Foubert, Kenneth A. Marriott Dec 1996

Effects Of A Sexual Assault Peer Education Program On Men's Belief In Rape Myths., John D. Foubert, Kenneth A. Marriott

John D. Foubert

An all-male sexual assault peer education program was shown to lead to a decline in rape myth acceptance for two months among fraternity men.


Overcoming Men's Defensiveness Toward Sexual Assault Programs: Learning To Help Survivors., John D. Foubert, Kenneth A. Marriott Dec 1995

Overcoming Men's Defensiveness Toward Sexual Assault Programs: Learning To Help Survivors., John D. Foubert, Kenneth A. Marriott

John D. Foubert

A unique new approach to overcoming men's defensiveness toward sexual assault prevention programs is described. By appealing to audience members as potential helpers of women who survive rape as opposed to addressing them as potential rapists, programmatic goals can be achieved.