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Higher Education Administration

Selected Works

John D. Foubert

The Men's Program

Publication Year

Articles 1 - 6 of 6

Full-Text Articles in Education

The Men’S Program: Does It Impact College Men’S Bystander Efficacy And Willingness To Intervene?, Jennifer Langhinrichsen-Rohling, John D. Foubert, Brent Hill, Hope Brasfield, Shannon Shelley-Tremblay Dec 2010

The Men’S Program: Does It Impact College Men’S Bystander Efficacy And Willingness To Intervene?, Jennifer Langhinrichsen-Rohling, John D. Foubert, Brent Hill, Hope Brasfield, Shannon Shelley-Tremblay

John D. Foubert

This study considered whether a rape prevention program could reduce men’s rape myth acceptance, enhance the perceived effectiveness of college men’s bystander behavior, and increase men’s willingness to intervene as bystanders in potentially dangerous situations. As predicted, college men who experienced The Men’s Program significantly increased their self-reported willingness to help as a bystander and their perceived bystander efficacy in comparison to college men who experienced the comparison condition. Men’s Program participants also significantly decreased their self-reported rape myth acceptance in comparison with comparison condition participants. The college policy and rape prevention program planning implications ...


Answering The Questions Of Rape Prevention Research: A Response To Tharp Et Al. (2011), John D. Foubert Dec 2010

Answering The Questions Of Rape Prevention Research: A Response To Tharp Et Al. (2011), John D. Foubert

John D. Foubert

Rape prevention programmers and researchers have long struggled to select the most appropriate theoretical models to frame their work. Questions abound regarding appropriate standards of evidence for success of program interventions. The present article provides an alternative point of view to the one put forward by seven staff members from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Tharp et al., 2011). Questions are posed for readers to consider regarding the appropriateness of the medical model for rape prevention programs, whether randomized control trials are the one and only gold standard, whether programs presented to groups should be evaluated ...


In Their Own Words: Sophomore College Men Describe Attitude And Behavior Changes Resulting From A Rape Prevention Program Two Years After Their Participation., John D. Foubert, Eric Godin, Jerry Tatum Dec 2009

In Their Own Words: Sophomore College Men Describe Attitude And Behavior Changes Resulting From A Rape Prevention Program Two Years After Their Participation., John D. Foubert, Eric Godin, Jerry Tatum

John D. Foubert

The study conducted involved assessing students from a Southeastern public university during two academic years, after their participation in an all-male sexual assault peer education program. The study findings revealed that 79% of 184 college men reported attitude change, behavior change, or both. Furthermore, a multistage inductive analysis revealed that after seeing The Men’s Program, men intervened to prevent rapes from happening. Participants also modified their behavior to avoid committing sexual assault when they or a potential partner were under the influence of alcohol. Implications for future research were discussed.


First-Year Male Students’ Perceptions Of A Rape Prevention Program Seven Months After Their Participation: Attitude And Behavior Changes., John D. Foubert, Jerry Tatum, Eric Godin Dec 2009

First-Year Male Students’ Perceptions Of A Rape Prevention Program Seven Months After Their Participation: Attitude And Behavior Changes., John D. Foubert, Jerry Tatum, Eric Godin

John D. Foubert

Seven months after seeing The Men’s Program, a commonly used rape prevention program, 248 first-year college men responded to four openended questions concerning whether or not the program impacted their attitudes or behavior, particularly regarding alcohol related sexual assault. Two thirds of participants reported either attitude or behavior change during the preceding academic year due to the program’s effects or that the program reinforced their current beliefs, with many describing specific incidents of either intervening to prevent a rape, or stopping themselves from engaging in risky behavior.


Behavior Differences Seven Months Later: Effects Of A Rape Prevention Program, John D. Foubert Ph.D., Johnathan T. Newberry, Jerry Tatum Dec 2006

Behavior Differences Seven Months Later: Effects Of A Rape Prevention Program, John D. Foubert Ph.D., Johnathan T. Newberry, Jerry Tatum

John D. Foubert

First-year men at a midsized public university either saw a rape prevention program or were in a control group and were asked to complete attitude and behavior surveys at the beginning and end of an academic year. Participants were also asked whether they joined fraternities during that year. With 90% of first-year men participating throughout the duration of the study, results showed that men who joined fraternities during the year and had seen a rape prevention program at the beginning of the academic year were significantly less likely to commit a sexually coercive act during the year than control group ...


Effects Of A Sexual Assault Peer Education Program On Men's Belief In Rape Myths., John D. Foubert, Kenneth A. Marriott Dec 1996

Effects Of A Sexual Assault Peer Education Program On Men's Belief In Rape Myths., John D. Foubert, Kenneth A. Marriott

John D. Foubert

An all-male sexual assault peer education program was shown to lead to a decline in rape myth acceptance for two months among fraternity men.