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Research Collection Lee Kong Chian School Of Business

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Flipping A Course On Entrepreneurial Leadership In Ethnic Chinese Business: A Mobile Learning Perspective, Thomas Menkhoff Dec 2018

Flipping A Course On Entrepreneurial Leadership In Ethnic Chinese Business: A Mobile Learning Perspective, Thomas Menkhoff

Research Collection Lee Kong Chian School Of Business

This exploratory article reflects on the teaching experiences for a course on “Entrepreneurial Leadership in Ethnic Chinese Business” at the Singapore Management University (SMU). It was categorised as a mobile learning course with reference to the flipped classroom model, learner mobility, and user-generated content outside the classroom. We examine three examples of mobile learning projects which were assigned to students so that they would be able to internalise key course objectives such as gaining an appreciation of the structure, functions, and cultural uniqueness of traditional small Chinese business organisations in Singapore. The paper also addresses some of the challenges faced ...


Incorporating Microblogging (“Tweeting”) In Higher Education: Lessons Learnt In A Knowledge Management Course, Thomas Menkhoff, Yue Wah Chua, Magnus L. Bengtsson, C. Jason Woodard, Benjamin Gan Oct 2015

Incorporating Microblogging (“Tweeting”) In Higher Education: Lessons Learnt In A Knowledge Management Course, Thomas Menkhoff, Yue Wah Chua, Magnus L. Bengtsson, C. Jason Woodard, Benjamin Gan

Research Collection Lee Kong Chian School Of Business

This paper features a competency-enhancing social networking application which provides a solution for the dilemma of non-participating (non-engaged) students in class: ‘pedagogical tweeting’. Twitter’s micro-blogging service enables both instructors and students to send and read messages (tweets) of up to 140 characters, incl. links to blogs, web pages, photos, videos, etc. As Twitter can be accessed from a website, via applications on PC/Mac, iPhone, Android phones, etc., it represents an effective tool to engage students, e.g. by taking up questions during in-class and out-of-class discussions or by providing advice on assignments etc. Students in turn can generate ...