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Full-Text Articles in Education

Africa: The Management Education Challenge, Howard Thomas, Michelle P. Lee, Lynne Thomas, Alexander Wilson Jun 2017

Africa: The Management Education Challenge, Howard Thomas, Michelle P. Lee, Lynne Thomas, Alexander Wilson

Research Collection Lee Kong Chian School Of Business

The research evidence for this second volume of Africa: The Management Education Challenge is based primarily on around 40 in-depth, face-to-face, semi-structured interviews lasting about two to three hours. The interviewees were drawn from academia, business, media and government with expertise in management education.


Speaking Out & Speaking Up: Xinjiao Perspectives, Eng Fong Pang, Arnoud Cyriel Leo De Meyer Jan 2017

Speaking Out & Speaking Up: Xinjiao Perspectives, Eng Fong Pang, Arnoud Cyriel Leo De Meyer

Research Collection Lee Kong Chian School Of Business

Contents: A Singaporean in Xinjiang by Wong Ee Vin; Sex for Sale and Second Wives by Xue Jiarong; Singapore Families: Mixed Salad or New Rojak? by Darren Lim; Singaporean-Burmese, Burmese-Singaporean or Both? by In Jin Zaw; Foreign Workers: Seen but not Heard by Mohammad Muzhaffar & Rohith Misir; Wheel You Ride? by Khew Pei Xuan; Gaelic Kallang Roar by Kate Whyte; Gaming Virtual Reality, Seriously by Lin Junkang & Low Kai Loon; Cyber Vigilantes: Mobs or Cops? by Timothy Lim & Hermanth Kumar; Online Dating: Waiting for the Stars to Align by Alex Cherucheril & Muhammed Ismail; Tying the Knot, for Better or Worse? by Emilyn Phang & Hollie Dawson; The Poor in Singapore: Whose Fault ...


Making Sense Of Life @ / & Smu: A Partial Guide For The Clueless, Eng Fong Pang Jan 2017

Making Sense Of Life @ / & Smu: A Partial Guide For The Clueless, Eng Fong Pang

Research Collection Lee Kong Chian School Of Business

This volume provides unexpectedly heartwarming and heartbreaking insights into the interior lives and thoughts of SMU business graduates. It is both a paean to and an indictment of Singapore’s education system and its excessively powerful formative impact on individual lives, family relationships, and Singapore society as a whole. The youthful contributors overwhelmingly accept life aspirations imposed by the expectations of family, society and self, which they themselves recognise are uniform and limiting. Their intensely personal reflections, unleavened by humour, lay bare the contradictory liberating and homogenising effects of an undergraduate business education (not peculiar to SMU or Singapore only ...