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Full-Text Articles in Education

Challenges To Democratic Inclusion And Contestation Of Space: Contemporary Student Activists In Transforming South Africa, Momo Wilms-Crowe Oct 2018

Challenges To Democratic Inclusion And Contestation Of Space: Contemporary Student Activists In Transforming South Africa, Momo Wilms-Crowe

Independent Study Project (ISP) Collection

Twenty-four years into democracy, in a time marked by stark inequality and rising levels of political disillusionment, student activists are key players in the pursuit of a more just, more equitable, and more democratic South Africa. Using universities as spaces to contest, disrupt, and challenge the status quo, student activists challenge narratives of youth political apathy and act as agents of change, encouraging society to meet the goals established in the 1996 Constitution, the document enshrining the very promises they were born into believing would be their reality. Through mobilization and organizing, student actors boldly engage in questions of substantive ...


Mind Control In The Post-Colonial State: The Impact Of Foreign Direct Investment In Tertiary Education In Senegal And Jamaica, Janiel Chantae Slowly Oct 2018

Mind Control In The Post-Colonial State: The Impact Of Foreign Direct Investment In Tertiary Education In Senegal And Jamaica, Janiel Chantae Slowly

Independent Study Project (ISP) Collection

Since the end of 17th to 20th century colonization, Senegal and Jamaica have been victims of the rhetoric of development. The economic, social, and political progress of these nations have always been overshadowed by their categorization as “developing countries”. Yet, this development rhetoric fails to acknowledge not only the wounds of colonization but the more modern manifestations of continued exploitation of these countries often by the same countries that “emancipated” their colonies. Senegal and Jamaica for example, are both dominated by large percentages of young adults, in both cases a large majority of the populations are individuals under the age ...


The Lost & Found Game Series: Teaching Medieval Religious Law In Context, Owen Gottlieb, Ian Schreiber Aug 2018

The Lost & Found Game Series: Teaching Medieval Religious Law In Context, Owen Gottlieb, Ian Schreiber

Presentations and other scholarship

Lost & Found is a strategy card-to-mobile game series that teaches medieval religious legal systems with attention to period accuracy and cultural and historical context. The Lost & Found project seeks to expand the discourse around religious legal systems, to enrich public conversations in a variety of communities, and to promote greater understanding of the religious traditions that build the fabric of the United States. Comparative religious literacy can build bridges between and within communities and prepare learners to be responsible citizens in our pluralist democracy. The first game in the series is a strategy game called Lost & Found (high school and ...


Interview Of Richard Mshomba, Ph.D., Richard Mshomba Ph.D., Daniel Miller Apr 2017

Interview Of Richard Mshomba, Ph.D., Richard Mshomba Ph.D., Daniel Miller

All Oral Histories

Dr. Richard Mshomba is an economics professor at La Salle University. He was born in Tanzania and spent his early adult life working for the Tanzanian government. When he was 27 he came to the United States to attend school at La Salle College. While attending La Salle he lived with the brother of a local Bishop who helped to get Richard accepted to La Salle. Richard spent three years at La Salle College earning his degree in Economics. After talking with his professor Richard Garrison, he decided to apply to graduate school at the University of Delaware. While he ...


Education And Literacy, Carol Summers Jan 2013

Education And Literacy, Carol Summers

History Faculty Publications

Loram's definition of education as planned by the powerful for the social construction of useful and 'good' Africans, along with his implicit concerns about bad or disruptive literate individuals, represented the views of many educationists during the colonial era. Such views, moreover, survived the end of colonial rule, re-emerging at the centre of shifting debates over how educational institutions and pedagogies should either persist or be challenged. Social utility defined education, not its specific content in reading, arithmetic, religious faith, business, or gardening. Struggles over educational planning were less over whether it was a form of social control than ...


Particularizing Universal Education In Postcolonial Sierra Leone, Grace Pai Jan 2013

Particularizing Universal Education In Postcolonial Sierra Leone, Grace Pai

Publications and Research

This paper presents a vertical case study of the history of universalizing education in postcolonial Sierra Leone from the early 1950s to 1990 to highlight how there has never been a universal conception of universal education. In order to unite a nation behind a universal ideal of schooling, education needed to be adapted to different subpopulations, as the Bunumbu Project did for rural Sierra Leoneans in the 1970s to 1980s. While the idea of “localizing” education was sound, early program success was undermined by a lack of clarity behind terms like “rural” or “community.” This was exacerbated by a change ...


The War On Aids: The Abc's Of Fighting This War, A Historical Perspective, Laura A. Ivey Jan 2006

The War On Aids: The Abc's Of Fighting This War, A Historical Perspective, Laura A. Ivey

Master's Capstone Projects

No abstract provided.


'Subterranean Evil' And 'Tumultuous Riot' In Buganda: Authority And Alienation At King's College, Budo, 1942, Carol Summers Jan 2006

'Subterranean Evil' And 'Tumultuous Riot' In Buganda: Authority And Alienation At King's College, Budo, 1942, Carol Summers

History Faculty Publications

Staff petitions, sexual and disciplinary scandal and open riot pushed Buganda's leaders to close Budo College on the eve of Kabaka (King) Muteesa II's coronation. The upheaval at the school included a teachers' council that pro-claimed ownership of the school, student leaders who manipulated the headmaster through scandal and school clubs and associations that celebrated affiliation over discipline. Instead of enacting and celebrating imperial partnership and order in complex, well-choreographed coronation rituals, the school's disruption delineated the fractures and struggles over rightful authority, order and patronage within colonial Buganda, marking out a future of tumultuous political transition.


Giving Orders In Rural Southern Rhodesia: Controversies Over Africans’ Authority In Development Programs, 1928-1934, Carol Summers Jan 1998

Giving Orders In Rural Southern Rhodesia: Controversies Over Africans’ Authority In Development Programs, 1928-1934, Carol Summers

History Faculty Publications

This article focuses on the period from 1928 to 1935, Depression years, when Harold Jowitt was director of native development. During these years, debates over the Jeanes teacher program, and specifically over the careers of Matthew Magorimbo and Lysias Mukahleyi, exposed both the needs that drew the administration and missions toward community-based development, and the questions of power, authority, and resources that blocked community development, and more specifically the Jeanes teacher program, from achieving its stated aims.


Ua35/11 Student Honors Research Bulletin, Wku Honors Program Jan 1997

Ua35/11 Student Honors Research Bulletin, Wku Honors Program

WKU Archives Records

The WKU Student Honors Research Bulletin is dedicated to scholarly involvement and student research. These papers are representative of work done by students from throughout the university.

  • Bullington, Brittany. A History of the Piano Girl and Her Accomplishments: Women and Music in Nineteenth-Century England
  • Ellis, Joseph. The Howl of the Mob: Adapting to Violence in Somalia
  • Farrar, Mary. Expectations of Family Physicians: Perceptions of the Doctor and Patient
  • Freeman, Tracy. Martha Gellhorn: The Hemingway Years
  • Guillory, Anne. The Flemish Mare: Anne of Cleves
  • Jordan, Pat. Marketing a Deadly Addiction to Youths
  • Marx, Sarah. Comic Books: Carnage in Living Color
  • May ...


"If You Can Educate The Native Woman...": Debates Over The Schooling And Education Of Girls And Women In Southern Rhodesia, 1900-1934, Carol Summers Jan 1996

"If You Can Educate The Native Woman...": Debates Over The Schooling And Education Of Girls And Women In Southern Rhodesia, 1900-1934, Carol Summers

History Faculty Publications

As the turn of the century, European settlers, officials, and missionaries in Southern Rhodesia were apathetic about promoting African girls' schooling. By the late 1920s, however, all sectors of the European community-settlers, officials, and missionaries- were debating whether, and for what reasons, girls should attend mission schools.1 Europeans discussed girls' and women's schooling as a strategy for coping with problems in the social and economic development of the region. Some Native Commissioners hope that disciplined moral education would encourage women to remain in rural areas and take responsibility for their families, supporting the system of migrant labor. Many ...


0522: Ancella Bickley Collection, 1908-1947, Marshall University Special Collections Jan 1990

0522: Ancella Bickley Collection, 1908-1947, Marshall University Special Collections

Guides to Manuscript Collections

West Virginia educator. Papers consist primarily of programs of events related to African-Americans in West Virginia, especially Douglass High School in Huntington, West Virginia.


0418: Whittaker-Glanville Family Papers, 1856-1985, Marshall University Special Collections Jan 1985

0418: Whittaker-Glanville Family Papers, 1856-1985, Marshall University Special Collections

Guides to Manuscript Collections

Papers consist primarily of diaries, newspaper clippings, correspondence, genealogies and photographs of five families: the Glanville-Carter families of St. Louis, Mo.; the Whittakers of Preble County, Ohio; Dorothy Whittaker Atkins of Huntington, West Virginia.; and the Heacocks of Bucks County, Penna.

A significant part of the collection are the diaries of Annie Heacock, a teacher at the Penn School for freed slaves in Beaufort, South Carolina, 1864-1869. Other diaries include the Civil War diary of John Whittaker, a surgeon in the 81st Ohio Volunteer Infantry.


Ua37/23 Whas Broadcast No. 24, Whas, Western Kentucky University, Earl Moore Mar 1936

Ua37/23 Whas Broadcast No. 24, Whas, Western Kentucky University, Earl Moore

WKU Archives Records

Script for weekly WKU broadcast on WHAS radio. This particular show is a play written using letters owned by Lenora Lindley of Livermore, Kentucky written by a freed slave in Liberia to her former owner in Ohio County, Kentucky.