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Full-Text Articles in Labor Relations

A Moral Contractual Approach To Labor Law Reform: A Template For Using Ethical Principles To Regulate Behavior Where Law Failed To Do So Effectively, Zev J. Eigen, David S. Sherwyn Jan 2011

A Moral Contractual Approach To Labor Law Reform: A Template For Using Ethical Principles To Regulate Behavior Where Law Failed To Do So Effectively, Zev J. Eigen, David S. Sherwyn

Faculty Working Papers

If laws cease to work as they should or as intended, legislators and scholars propose new laws to replace or amend them. This paper posits an alternative—offering regulated parties the opportunity to contractually bind themselves to behave ethically. The perfect test-case for this proposal is labor law, because (1) labor law has not been amended for decades, (2) proposals to amend it have failed for political reasons, and are focused on union election win rates, and less on the election process itself, (3) it is an area of law already statutorily regulating parties' reciprocal contractual obligations, and (4) moral ...


Do Work Benefits Affect Employee Morale?, Angela Franklin Jan 2011

Do Work Benefits Affect Employee Morale?, Angela Franklin

A with Honors Projects

Survey of how Schnucks employees feel about their work benefits and research paper as to whether this affects their morale.


More Evidence On The Value Of Chinese Workers’ Psychological Capital: A Potentially Unlimited Competitive Resource?, Fred Luthans, James Avey, Rachel Clapp-Smith, Weixing Li May 2008

More Evidence On The Value Of Chinese Workers’ Psychological Capital: A Potentially Unlimited Competitive Resource?, Fred Luthans, James Avey, Rachel Clapp-Smith, Weixing Li

Management Department Faculty Publications

As China continues its unprecedented economic growth and emergence as a world power, new solutions must be forthcoming to meet the accompanying challenges. We propose a positive approach to Chinese HRM that recognizes, develops and manages the psychological capital (PsyCap) of workers. After providing a brief overview of hope, efficacy, optimism, resilience and overall PsyCap in today’s Chinese context, the results of a follow-up study provide further evidence that the PsyCap of Chinese workers is related to their performance. The implications that this evidencebased value of Chinese workers’ psychological capital has for China now and into the future concludes ...


The Personal Information Trainer, Stuart Basefsky Nov 2007

The Personal Information Trainer, Stuart Basefsky

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] The Personal Information Trainer (PIT) can become a unique employee benefit written into the employment contract of key individuals (very few) deemed to be essential to the success of a firm or institution. This is a no-extra-cost (non-compensatory) benefit that can help improve recruitment and retention of top talent and enhance the library’s value proposition. This concept is useful to human resource managers, libraries, and the institutions they serve. This article provides the fundamental concepts and constructs necessary to implement such a program with an emphasis on why and how this should be done.


The Role Of Employers In Phased Retirement: Opportunities For Phased Retirement Among White-Collar Workers, Robert M. Hutchens, Jennjou Chen Jan 2007

The Role Of Employers In Phased Retirement: Opportunities For Phased Retirement Among White-Collar Workers, Robert M. Hutchens, Jennjou Chen

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] While the labor market for older workers has many unusual features, the small number of phased retirements is certainly one of the more curious. The basic idea of phased retirement is that an older worker remains with his or her employer while gradually shifting from full-time work to full-time retirement. For decades experts have proclaimed the advantages of this type of retirement. Moreover, employees often express an interest in taking a phased retirement. In a recent national survey of the older population, more than half of the respondents age 55 to 65 said they would prefer to gradually reduce ...


Ilr Impact Brief – Diversity And Inclusion: Is There Really A Difference?, Quinetta M. Roberson Nov 2006

Ilr Impact Brief – Diversity And Inclusion: Is There Really A Difference?, Quinetta M. Roberson

Policy & Issue Briefs

By almost any measure, workforce heterogeneity is increasing. With more women, ethnic and racial. minorities, and people with different lifestyles and learning styles holding down jobs, employers are searching for strategies that effectively and efficiently put these varied skills and perspectives to maximal use. Traditional approaches to diversity management include targeted recruitment, career development, mentoring, and education and training. Some organizations, however, take a broader view and seek to eliminate barriers to full utilization of varied worker competencies. This latter approach stresses inclusion, rather than diversity, and typically involves initiatives that focus on employee participation, enhanced communication, and stronger community ...


Job Opportunities For Older Workers: When Are Jobs Filled With External Hires?, Robert M. Hutchens Feb 2006

Job Opportunities For Older Workers: When Are Jobs Filled With External Hires?, Robert M. Hutchens

Articles and Chapters

This paper examines why firms sometimes employ older workers, but tend to not hire new older workers for the same job. It focuses on one aspect of that phenomenon: the propensity for firms to fill jobs from the inside rather than hire someone new from the outside. Using a survey of establishments with information on a white collar job currently held by an older worker, the paper tests hypotheses on what types of jobs are likely to be filled from the outside. Several of the results point to the potential importance of asymmetric information, whereby the firm has better information ...


Academic Education And Occupational Training, John H. Bishop Jun 2001

Academic Education And Occupational Training, John H. Bishop

Articles and Chapters

“Most of the young people entering professional, technical, and managerial occupations start their occupational training in a school. Higher education is predominantly occupational education and is becoming more 80 each year. In 1980-81, only 17 percent of rnaster9s degrees and 33 percent of bachelor's degrees were in traditional liberal arts fields. Many of those who get these degrees remain in school to get a Ph.D., M.D., D.D.S. or L.L.B., all of which certify three or more years of intensive occupational training. Consequently, almost all college graduates obtain training for a particular occupation before ...


Competing For Attention In Knowledge Markets: Electronic Document Dissemination In A Management Consulting Company, Martine R. Haas, Morten T. Hansen Mar 2001

Competing For Attention In Knowledge Markets: Electronic Document Dissemination In A Management Consulting Company, Martine R. Haas, Morten T. Hansen

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] The relatively recent explosion of information available in electronic forms makes attention, rather than information, the scarce resource in organizations. In this paper, we theorize about how suppliers of electronic information compete for this resource and use data on document database use in a management consulting company to show that document suppliers that occupied a crowded segment of the firm's internal knowledge market gained less attention from employees (measured as monthly use of their database) but were able to combat this negative competitive effect by being selective and concentrated in their document supply. This result reveals a paradox ...


The Evolution Of Strategic And Coordinated Bargaining Campaigns In The 1990s: The Steelworkers’ Experience, Kate Bronfenbrenner, Tom Juravich Jan 2001

The Evolution Of Strategic And Coordinated Bargaining Campaigns In The 1990s: The Steelworkers’ Experience, Kate Bronfenbrenner, Tom Juravich

Articles and Chapters

"With the refocusing of attention of the labor movement on organizing, an increasing number of scholars have been directing their research toward the nature and practice of current union organizing efforts. These scholars have begun updating a literature that had grown sorely out of touch with the organizing experience of America’s unions and have provided the foundation for a more sophisticated understanding of the organizing process. While we applaud this resurgence in organizing research, there has not been a comparable resurgence in research on collective bargaining…"


Are National Exit Examinations Important For Educational Efficiency?, John H. Bishop Sep 1999

Are National Exit Examinations Important For Educational Efficiency?, John H. Bishop

Articles and Chapters

“This paper analyses effects of national or provincial exit examinations on education quality. On theoretical grounds, the paper argues that such examinations should increase high school achievement, particularly in examination subjects, and that teachers and students and parents and school administrators should focus more on academic achievement when making school-quality decisions. On the negative side, exit examinations may lead to a tendency to concentrate on learning facts, rather than understanding contexts.”


Women And The Labor Movement: An Interview With Linda Chavez-Thompson, Pam Henderson, Susan Woods Mar 1999

Women And The Labor Movement: An Interview With Linda Chavez-Thompson, Pam Henderson, Susan Woods

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] Linda Chavez-Thompson is the executive vice-president of the AFL-CIO and the highest ranking elected woman officer in the labor federation's I IO-year history. She rose from the organizing ranks of The American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees to achieve a distinguished career as a national labor leader and representative of public-sector employees. A second generation Mexican-American, her work life began at age ten laboring with her parents, ten-hour days at thirty cents an hour: in the cotton fields of West Texas. Before assuming one of the three highest leadership positions within the AFL-CIO, she directed AFSCME ...


The Effect Of Curriculum-Based External Exit Exam Systems On Student Achievement, John H. Bishop Mar 1998

The Effect Of Curriculum-Based External Exit Exam Systems On Student Achievement, John H. Bishop

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] Two presidents, the National Governors Association, and numerous blue-ribbon panels have called for the development of state or national content standards for core subjects and examinations that assess student achievement of these standards. The Competitiveness Policy Council, for example, advocated that "external assessments be given to individual students at the secondary level and that the results should be a major but not exclusive factor qualifying for college and better jobs at better wages." It is claimed that curriculum-based external exit exam systems (CBEEESs) based on explicit content standards will improve the teaching and learning of core subjects. What evidence ...


Health Hazard Manual: Wastewater Treatment Plant And Sewer Workers, Nellie J. Brown Dec 1997

Health Hazard Manual: Wastewater Treatment Plant And Sewer Workers, Nellie J. Brown

Manuals and User Guides

[Excerpt] This manual examines how exposure occurs during the treatment processes; ways to reduce exposure by engineering controls, administrative controls, process control strategies, and protective equipment; and some suggested medical surveillance.


In Search Of A Niche, John H. Bishop Oct 1995

In Search Of A Niche, John H. Bishop

Articles and Chapters

"As enrollment in secondary vocational education programs declines and employers re-evaluate the attributes needed for success in today’s job market, some observers of the U.S. education system have called for schools to limit – or even eliminate – the teaching of occupational skills. Does this mean employers don’t reward such training?"


The Impact Of Employer Opposition On Union Certification Win Rates: A Private/Public Sector Comparison, Kate Bronfenbrenner, Tom Juravich Oct 1994

The Impact Of Employer Opposition On Union Certification Win Rates: A Private/Public Sector Comparison, Kate Bronfenbrenner, Tom Juravich

Articles and Chapters

"This report represents the first part of a larger study of public sector organizing that will include a detailed examination of certification, decerticification and multi-union challenge elections."


The Future Of Employee-Employer Relations, Thomas A. Kochan Sep 1994

The Future Of Employee-Employer Relations, Thomas A. Kochan

CAHRS Working Paper Series

[Excerpt] This paper seeks to initiate a discussion of the challenges facing the future of employee-employer relations in the United States. I take a very broad perspective to the task, one that reflects the expanded domain of issues, activities, and parties that must be considered if employee relations are to contribute to the twin challenges facing the American economy and workforce: The need to improve long term economic competitiveness while simultaneously improving our standards of living.


Employer Behavior In Certification Elections And First-Contract Campaigns: Implications For Labor Law Reform, Kate Bronfenbrenner Jan 1994

Employer Behavior In Certification Elections And First-Contract Campaigns: Implications For Labor Law Reform, Kate Bronfenbrenner

Articles and Chapters

"Organizing is an extremely risky and arduous venture for American workers. As the experience of the last twenty years has shown, a combination of unfettered employer antiunion behavior and weak and poorly enforced labor law make for an ‘unlevel playing field’ stacked against unorganized workers and unions. Using survey data from private-sector certification election and first contract campaigns, this chapter will first examine the impact of NLRB practices and legal and illegal employer behavior on union election and first-contract outcomes. It will then evaluate how labor law reform would reduce the ability of employers to undermine workers’ efforts to organize ...


Unions And The Contingent Workforce, Kate Bronfenbrenner Jan 1994

Unions And The Contingent Workforce, Kate Bronfenbrenner

Articles and Chapters

"In 1985, Stephen F. Austin State University in Nacogdoches, Texas, announced that it was going to contract out the work of its food-service department, effectively terminating 156 employees. This action was taken despite the department’s well-established record of profitability and quality service. A workforce of almost entirely African-American women, the food-service workers averaged only $3.80 per hour and they were rarely offered a full work week. Fully aware of the limited number of opportunities in East Texas for women and minorities, the workers were prepared to go to great lengths to prevent their jobs from being eliminated. Most ...


Do Most Employers And Workers Underinvest In Training And Learning On The Job?, John H. Bishop Jan 1993

Do Most Employers And Workers Underinvest In Training And Learning On The Job?, John H. Bishop

Articles and Chapters

"Many economists question the need for social intervention in training, arguing that the benefits accruing to employers and employees create sufficient incentive for private financing. Research findings indicate that in practice this means depending on employers because it is they who pay for the bulk of employee training, even when the skills being taught are useful at other firms. Yet in practice, private incentives for on-the-job learning and training do not currently generate broader results that are in the public interest. This chapter looks at the theoretical and empirical evidence of market failure in training provisions. It argues that the ...


The Worsening Shortage Of College-Graduate Workers, John H. Bishop, Shani Carter Sep 1991

The Worsening Shortage Of College-Graduate Workers, John H. Bishop, Shani Carter

Articles and Chapters

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projections of occupational employment growth have consistently underpredicted the growth of skilled occupations. BLS currently projects that professional, technical, and managerial jobs will account for 44.5% of employment growth between 1988 and 2000, while we project they will account for 70% of employment growth. Between March 1988 and March 1991 these occupations, in fact, accounted for 87% of employment growth. The BLS's projections of the supply/demand balance for college graduates have also been off the mark-predicting a surplus for the 1980s when, in fact, a shortage developed, and relative wage ratios ...


Making Vocational Education More Effective For At-Risk Youth, John H. Bishop May 1989

Making Vocational Education More Effective For At-Risk Youth, John H. Bishop

Articles and Chapters

"Occupationally specific vocational training pays off for disadvantaged students, but only if graduates work in the jobs they were trained for. Implication: Vocational educators must help make sure that the skills they teach are used."


Why The Apathy In American High Schools?, John H. Bishop Jan 1989

Why The Apathy In American High Schools?, John H. Bishop

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] Yes, it is a classic chicken versus egg problem. We assign teachers the responsibility for setting high standards but we do not give them any of the tools that might be effective for inducing student observance of the academic goals of the classroom. They finally must rely on the force of their own personalities. All too often teachers compromise academic demands because the majority of the class sees no need to accept them as reasonable and legitimate.


Organised Labour And Community Colleges, Lois S. Gray Oct 1976

Organised Labour And Community Colleges, Lois S. Gray

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] This paper will explore areas of labour-community college cooperation, survey jointly planned programmes currently underway, and analyse problem areas.


Some Thoughts On The Cost Effectiveness Of Graduate Education Subsidies, John H. Bishop Jul 1974

Some Thoughts On The Cost Effectiveness Of Graduate Education Subsidies, John H. Bishop

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] How much should doctorate training be subsidized? The answer proposed is, "Doctorate training should be subsidized to the extent and only to the extent that it produces externality or public benefits – i.e. benefits received by people other than the one receiving the diploma." This value judgment derives from three propositions: (1) In general, an adult knows better than anyone else what is best for himself; (2) the price (measured in both time and money) he is willing to pay for graduate education is the best measure of how much he values it relative to other offerings; and (3 ...