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Full-Text Articles in Labor Relations

Newsletter Vol.21 No.4 1993, National Center For The Study Of Collective Bargaining In Higher Education And The Professions Nov 1993

Newsletter Vol.21 No.4 1993, National Center For The Study Of Collective Bargaining In Higher Education And The Professions

National Center Newsletters

No abstract provided.


International Labor Rights And The Sovereignty Question: Nafta And Guatemala, Two Case Studies, Lance A. Compa Oct 1993

International Labor Rights And The Sovereignty Question: Nafta And Guatemala, Two Case Studies, Lance A. Compa

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] Labor rights advocates in the United States and allied organizations abroad attempting to establish international fair labor standards run up against traditional notions of sovereignty in formulating national labor policies and development strategies. In the same way that entrenched sovereignty principles gradually yielded to international human rights claims after World War E, sovereignty is now being challenged by claims of international laborrights in the field of employment standards and industrial relations.

This Article seeks to illuminate this challenge to sovereignty in two case studies of labor rights advocacy. Part I sets the stage with an overview of the ...


Newsletter Vol.21 No.3 1993, National Center For The Study Of Collective Bargaining In Higher Education And The Professions Sep 1993

Newsletter Vol.21 No.3 1993, National Center For The Study Of Collective Bargaining In Higher Education And The Professions

National Center Newsletters

No abstract provided.


Immigrant Labor And The Issue Of “Dirty Work” In Advanced Industrial Societies, Vernon M. Briggs Jul 1993

Immigrant Labor And The Issue Of “Dirty Work” In Advanced Industrial Societies, Vernon M. Briggs

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] Of the multiple explanations for the post-World War II immigration experiences of those advanced industrial nations where the phenomena occurred, the most pernicious has been that immigrants are needed to do the "dirty work." Despite the fact that efforts to characterize the general employment patterns of immigrants in different industrial societies "has proved frustrating," Michael Piore observed in 1979 that "the only immigrant jobs that seem common throughout the industrial world are menial jobs". Likewise, much of the debate in the United States that preceded the enactment of the Immigration Reform and Control Act of, 1986 (IRCA) centered on ...


Newsletter Vol.21 No.2 1993, National Center For The Study Of Collective Bargaining In Higher Education And The Professions Apr 1993

Newsletter Vol.21 No.2 1993, National Center For The Study Of Collective Bargaining In Higher Education And The Professions

National Center Newsletters

No abstract provided.


A Dead-End Street: Female Immigrants And Child Care, Vernon M. Briggs Mar 1993

A Dead-End Street: Female Immigrants And Child Care, Vernon M. Briggs

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] Over the past few decades, two highly significant, yet distinctly different influences have affected the U.S. labor market: the mass movement of adult women with young children into the labor force and an upsurge in mass immigration that includes a disproportionate number of unskilled and poorly-educated women from the Third World. Among these are many who have entered illegally. Estimates of the number of unskilled domestic workers residing illegally in the United States range between 50,000 and 150,000.


Functional Explanation And Metaphysical Individualism, Justin Schwartz Jan 1993

Functional Explanation And Metaphysical Individualism, Justin Schwartz

Justin Schwartz

A number of (present or former) analytical Marxists, such as Jon Elster, have argued that functional explanation has almost no place in the social sciences. (Although the discussion is framed in terms of a debate among analytical Marxists, the point is quite general, and Marxism is used for illustrative purposes.) Functional explanation accounts for what is to be explained by reference to its function; thus, sighted organism have eyes because eyes enable them to see. Elster and other critics of functional explanation argue that this pattern of explanation is inconsistent with "methodological individualism," the idea, as they understand it, that ...


Newsletter Vol.21 No.1 1993, National Center For The Study Of Collective Bargaining In Higher Education And The Professions Jan 1993

Newsletter Vol.21 No.1 1993, National Center For The Study Of Collective Bargaining In Higher Education And The Professions

National Center Newsletters

No abstract provided.


Organizing And Representing Clerical Workers: The Harvard Model, Richard W. Hurd Jan 1993

Organizing And Representing Clerical Workers: The Harvard Model, Richard W. Hurd

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] The private sector clerical work force is largely nonunion, simultaneously offering the labor movement a major source of potential membership growth and an extremely difficult challenge. Based on December 1990 data, there are eighteen million workers employed in office clerical, administrative support, and related occupations. Eighty percent of these employees are women, accounting for 30 percent of all women in the labor force. Among private sector office workers, 57 percent work in the low-union-density industry groups of services (only 5.7 percent union) and finance, insurance, and real estate (only 2.5 percent union). With barely over ten million ...


Labor Law Successorship: A Corporate Law Approach, Edward B. Rock, Michael L. Wachter Jan 1993

Labor Law Successorship: A Corporate Law Approach, Edward B. Rock, Michael L. Wachter

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Economic Restructuring And Emerging Patterns Of Industrial Relations, Stephen R. Sleigh Jan 1993

Economic Restructuring And Emerging Patterns Of Industrial Relations, Stephen R. Sleigh

Upjohn Press

This book's essays analyze innovative responses by unions, corporations and governments to job loss caused by economic restructuring, drawing on examples from Western Europe and the U.S.