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Full-Text Articles in Labor Relations

A New Theory Of Group Solidarity, Barry Markovsky, Edward J. Lawler Jan 1994

A New Theory Of Group Solidarity, Barry Markovsky, Edward J. Lawler

Articles and Chapters

This paper examines previous conceptualizations of group solidarity and related concepts in the sociological and social psychological literatures. After identifying ambiguities in previous usages, we define solidarity in terms of relational patterns among actors. Specifically, solidarity is defined in terms of two network properties: the relative directness of ties among actors, and the homogeneity of those ties. In other words, solidarity exists for a given set of actors to the degree that they are directly connected to each other and there is an absence of subgroups or cliques. Although a variety of relational bases are conceivable, we illustrate our new ...


Swedish Professionals And Gender Inequalities, Charles W. Mueller, Sarosh Kuruvilla, Roderick D. Iverson Jan 1994

Swedish Professionals And Gender Inequalities, Charles W. Mueller, Sarosh Kuruvilla, Roderick D. Iverson

Articles and Chapters

The match of ideology and policy regarding gender equality in a corporatist society like Sweden should result in reduced gender inequality in access to supervisory authority and in earnings. The magnitude and form of this inequality is studied for a national sample of 1,359 full-time members of the professional union SACO in 1987-88. We find that Swedish professional women have only 68% of the supervisory positions that men have and 77% of the earnings that men have. These differences are not explained by process differences; human capital, family status, and structural variables generally produce access to authority and earnings ...


Do Historically Black Institutions Of Higher Education Confer Unique Advantages On Black Students? An Initial Analysis, Ronald G. Ehrenberg, Donna S. Rothstein Jan 1994

Do Historically Black Institutions Of Higher Education Confer Unique Advantages On Black Students? An Initial Analysis, Ronald G. Ehrenberg, Donna S. Rothstein

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] Despite the declining relative importance of HBIs in the production of black bachelor's degrees, in recent years they have become the subject of intense public policy debate for two reasons. First, court cases have been filed in a number of southern states that assert that black students continue to be underrepresented at traditionally white public institutions, that discriminatory admissions criteria are used by these institutions to exclude black students (e.g., basing admissions only on test scores and not also on grades), and that per student funding levels, program availability, and library facilities are substantially poorer at public ...