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Full-Text Articles in Labor Relations

Ethnic Democracy And Its Ambiguities: The Case Of The Needle Trade Unions, Gerd Korman Jun 1986

Ethnic Democracy And Its Ambiguities: The Case Of The Needle Trade Unions, Gerd Korman

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] During the years between World War I and World War II the conduct among well-known Jewish labor leaders seems to have foreshadowed events in the history of America’s nationality following the tumult of the 1960’s. In the 1920’s and 1930’s America’s elected or appointed officials still used a pecking order based on assumed inequalities of race, ethnicity, and gender in making policy decisions. They presumed that their private interests, those of the “insiders,” the “leading groups,” or “controlling minorities,” were the only appropriate ones for determining public policy. It was then, especially in the ...


Black Youth Nonemployment: Duration And Job Search: Comment, Ronald G. Ehrenberg Jan 1986

Black Youth Nonemployment: Duration And Job Search: Comment, Ronald G. Ehrenberg

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] Holzer's paper has a number of attributes that I find very appealing. It focuses on an important topic and uses two different data bases to test the robustness of its findings. It uses alternative specifications of the variable of interest (reservation wages), examines the sensitivity of the results to alternative sets of control variables, uses a variety of statistical methods to confront a number of statistical issues, and honestly reports cases in which any of the above leads to differences in results. Finally, the paper does not claim more than the evidence warrants—a feature not present in ...


Bilateral Deterrence And Conflict Spiral: A Theoretical Analysis, Edward J. Lawler Jan 1986

Bilateral Deterrence And Conflict Spiral: A Theoretical Analysis, Edward J. Lawler

Articles and Chapters

The major question addressed by this paper is: When each actor in a conflict or bargaining relationship has a power capability, how does the level of power capability in the relationship affect the likelihood of actors using coercive tactics? This paper explicates two theories that offer contradictory answers to this question. One theory, termed “deterrence,” predicts that (a) where actors have equal levels of power capability, the larger the mutual capability the lower the likelihood of using coercive tactics, and (b) conditions of unequal power capability produce more use of coercive tactics than conditions of equal power. A second theory ...


Power Dependence In Collective Bargaining, Edward J. Lawler, Samuel B. Bacharach Jan 1986

Power Dependence In Collective Bargaining, Edward J. Lawler, Samuel B. Bacharach

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] The purpose of this paper is to review and extend the implications of a dependence theory of bargaining power. This theory advances a much more complex conception of power than is typically found in either the general literature on power or the collective bargaining literature. The paper will identify certain paradoxes posed by dependence theory. These paradoxes help to illustrate the value of the theory in understanding the power relationships between labor and management, how these relationships can change over time, and how tactical action within particular contract negotiations can produce positive effects on the relationship that are not ...


Power Dependence And Power Paradoxes In Bargaining, Samuel B. Bacharach, Edward J. Lawler Jan 1986

Power Dependence And Power Paradoxes In Bargaining, Samuel B. Bacharach, Edward J. Lawler

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] What this article (and our larger program of work) is designed to demonstrate is that these very simple ideas represent a particularly suitable starting point for understanding the power struggle between parties who regularly engage in negotiation. Specifically, in this article we show that the approach contains certain paradoxes regarding the acquisition and use of power in an ongoing bargaining relationship. The dependence framework treats the ongoing relationship as a power struggle in which each party tries to maneuver itself into a favorable power position.