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Missing Links: Referrer Behavior And Job Segregation (Appendix), Brian Rubineau, Roberto Fernandez May 2013

Missing Links: Referrer Behavior And Job Segregation (Appendix), Brian Rubineau, Roberto Fernandez

Brian Rubineau

No abstract provided.


Missing Links: Referrer Behavior And Job Segregation, Brian Rubineau, Roberto Fernandez May 2013

Missing Links: Referrer Behavior And Job Segregation, Brian Rubineau, Roberto Fernandez

Brian Rubineau

The importance of networks in labor markets is well-known, and their job segregating effects in organizations taken as granted. Conventional wisdom attributes this segregation to the homophilous nature of contact networks, and leaves little role for organizational influences. But employee referrals are necessarily initiated within a firm by employee referrers subject to organizational policies. We build theory regarding the role of referrers in the segregating effects of network recruitment. Using mathematical and computational models, we investigate how empirically-documented referrer behaviors affect job segregation. We show that referrer behaviors can segregate jobs beyond the effects of homophilous network recruitment. Further, and ...


Bias In White: A Longitudinal Natural Experiment Measuring Changes In Discrimination, Brian Rubineau, Yoon Kang Feb 2013

Bias In White: A Longitudinal Natural Experiment Measuring Changes In Discrimination, Brian Rubineau, Yoon Kang

Brian Rubineau

Many professions are plagued by disparities in service delivery. Racial disparities in policing, mortgage lending, and healthcare are some notable examples. Because disparities can result from a myriad of mechanisms, crafting effective disparity mitigation policies requires knowing which mechanisms are active and which are not. In this study we can distinguish whether one mechanism—statistical discrimination—is a primary explanation for racial disparities in physicians’ treatment of patients. In a longitudinal natural experiment using repeated quasi-audit studies of medical students, we test for within-cohort changes in disparities from medical student behaviors as they interact with white and black patient actors ...