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Full-Text Articles in Labor Relations

When Job Performance Is All Relative: How Family Motivation Energizes Effort And Compensates For Intrinsic Motivation, Jochen I. Menges, Danielle V. Tussing, Andreas Wihler, Adam M. Grant Apr 2017

When Job Performance Is All Relative: How Family Motivation Energizes Effort And Compensates For Intrinsic Motivation, Jochen I. Menges, Danielle V. Tussing, Andreas Wihler, Adam M. Grant

Management Papers

Supporting one’s family is a major reason why many people work, yet surprisingly little research has examined the implications of family motivation. Drawing on theories of prosocial motivation and action identification, we propose that family motivation increases job performance by enhancing energy and reducing stress, and it is especially important when intrinsic motivation is lacking. Survey and diary data collected across multiple time points in a Mexican maquiladora generally support our model. Specifically, we find that family motivation enhances job performance when intrinsic motivation is low—in part by providing energy, but not by reducing stress. We conclude that ...


A Faultine-Based Model Of Team Leadership, Andrew M. Carton, Jonathan N. Cummings Jan 2009

A Faultine-Based Model Of Team Leadership, Andrew M. Carton, Jonathan N. Cummings

Management Papers

Modern work teams operate in environments where increasingly salient member differences lead to the emergence of subgroups. Building on findings from the faultline literature, we propose that team members typically organize into three types of subgorups—cliques, coalitions, and cohorts, and that different leader orientations are mandated by each subgroup type.


Three's A Crowd? Understanding Triadic Employment Relationships, Matthew Bidwell, Isabel Fernandez-Mateo Jan 2008

Three's A Crowd? Understanding Triadic Employment Relationships, Matthew Bidwell, Isabel Fernandez-Mateo

Management Papers

There are many facets to the typical employment relationship. At its very simplest, employment involves the exchange of labor for compensation. Nevertheless, employment relationships also involve control of the worker by the firm, the acquisition of skills through experience and training, learning about each others’ qualities and intentions, and career progression as the worker moves from role to role within the organization. In addition, employment usually imposes a variety of specific legal obligations on both employer and employee. Traditionally, these obligations have been combined into a single relationship between worker and firm.


Will There Really Be A Labor Shortage?, Peter Cappelli Jun 2004

Will There Really Be A Labor Shortage?, Peter Cappelli

Management Papers

A number of studies have been released in recent years from prestigious think-tanks, such as the Hudson Institute, and leading consulting firms, such as Wyatt and McKinsey, predicting severe labor market shortages for the U.S. economy in the decades ahead. Some go as far as to suggest that the U.S. economy will experience widespread job vacancies that cannot be filled because of a shortfall of workers. In these arguments, the shortfall is typically blamed on the small size of the "baby bust" cohort, the generation that has followed the baby boomers into the labor market.