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Labor Relations Commons

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Education

ILR

Series

2001

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Labor Relations

Stw In The 1990s: School–Employer Partnerships And Student Outcomes, John H. Bishop, Ferran Mane, S. Antonio Ruiz-Quintanilla Sep 2001

Stw In The 1990s: School–Employer Partnerships And Student Outcomes, John H. Bishop, Ferran Mane, S. Antonio Ruiz-Quintanilla

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] Before the school-to-work (STW) movement began improving communication between schools and employers in the past decade, high-school achievement counted little in hiring decisions, because recent graduates could not signal skills and discipline to employers. Most requests for high school transcripts went unanswered, and employers hired workers with demonstrated job skills, freezing most graduates out of the primary labor market. Relegated to the secondary, unskilled market, graduates with strong basic skills saw a long delay before good job performance improved their income. Consequently, high-school students saw little relation between studying and labor-market rewards. Since they observed recent graduates with good ...


Academic Education And Occupational Training, John H. Bishop Jun 2001

Academic Education And Occupational Training, John H. Bishop

Articles and Chapters

“Most of the young people entering professional, technical, and managerial occupations start their occupational training in a school. Higher education is predominantly occupational education and is becoming more 80 each year. In 1980-81, only 17 percent of rnaster9s degrees and 33 percent of bachelor's degrees were in traditional liberal arts fields. Many of those who get these degrees remain in school to get a Ph.D., M.D., D.D.S. or L.L.B., all of which certify three or more years of intensive occupational training. Consequently, almost all college graduates obtain training for a particular occupation before ...


La Educación Secundaria En Los Estados Unidos. ¿Qué Pueden Aprender Otros De Nuestros Errores?, John H. Bishop, Ferran Mane, Michael Bishop Jan 2001

La Educación Secundaria En Los Estados Unidos. ¿Qué Pueden Aprender Otros De Nuestros Errores?, John H. Bishop, Ferran Mane, Michael Bishop

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] El ritmo de los estudiantes estadounidenses para adquirir nuevas habilidades se desacelera durante la educación secundaria.