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Labor Relations Commons

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Education

Cornell University

2006

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Labor Relations

Community Colleges Go Outside To Fill Key Posts, Barbara Viniar Jun 2006

Community Colleges Go Outside To Fill Key Posts, Barbara Viniar

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] Ask one community college leader if hiring individuals who haven’t come through the ranks makes sense, and he will say absolutely not, the cultural adjustment is too difficult. Ask another, and she will say that with the right guidance and orientation, “outsiders” make excellent hires. Ask another, and you’ll hear that there is an adequate by underrepresented pool of potential leaders among women and minorities already in community colleges, why go outside?


Institute For Community College Development Addresses Leadership Crisis, Barbara Viniar Jan 2006

Institute For Community College Development Addresses Leadership Crisis, Barbara Viniar

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] It is projected that between 2001 and 2007, 47 percent of community college presidents will have left their positions. At a time when challenges are growing more complex, the senior administrators who typically moved into presidencies are also "aging out," leaving fewer qualified individuals in the pipeline. The Institute for Community College Development (ICCD), a partnership between the State University of New York (SUNY) and Cornell, was founded by a group of community college presidents to respond to this leadership crisis. ICCD has been part of ILR since 2001.


Labor And Regional Development In The U.S.A.: Building A High Road Infrastructure In Buffalo, New York, Ian Greer, Lou Jean Fleron Jan 2006

Labor And Regional Development In The U.S.A.: Building A High Road Infrastructure In Buffalo, New York, Ian Greer, Lou Jean Fleron

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] In a country where worker representatives lack broadly institutionalized roles as "social partners," how can they play a constructive role in solving the problems of regional development? In Buffalo, New York, regularized, labor-inclusive procedures of problem solving involving multiple coalition partners – what we call a high-road social infrastructure – has emerged. Socially engaged researchers and educators have played a role in spreading lessons and organizing dialogue. Despite the emergence of regional cooperation, however, successful development politics are hampered by many of the same problems seen in European regions, including uncertainty about the best union strategy, hostility from business and political ...