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Social and Behavioral Sciences

2015

Iowa Ag Review

Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Insurance

Boom Times For Crop Insurance, Bruce A. Babcock Jul 2015

Boom Times For Crop Insurance, Bruce A. Babcock

Iowa Ag Review

Crop farmers are enjoying record high profi ts because of dramatically higher market prices. Farmers’ increased demand for land, seed, fertilizer, and machinery has resulted in higher prices and profi ts for sellers of these inputs as well. One industry that is also enjoying the higher crop prices is the crop insurance industry. It benefits from higher prices because the formulas used to determine industry revenue automatically generate higher expected subsidies as crop prices rise. Actual subsidies depend in part on crop losses, but administrative and operating subsidies are directly tied to crop prices. Figure 1 shows how total industry ...


Corn Belt Contributions To The Crop Insurance Industry, Bruce A. Babcock Jul 2015

Corn Belt Contributions To The Crop Insurance Industry, Bruce A. Babcock

Iowa Ag Review

The crop insurance industry enjoyed another banner year in 2007, collecting $6.5 billion in premiums yet paying out only $3.2 billion in losses. I estimate that the industry will collect a record $2.8 billion from taxpayers. In contrast, the net amount that farmers received from the program in 2007 was only $750 million. Interestingly, since the beginning of this decade, the $11.3 billion in net payments to farmers (indemnities received minus farmer-paid premiums) is about equal to the amount that taxpayers have paid the industry ($11.1 billion). Overall, taxpayers have spent more than $22 billion ...


Drought Tolerance And Risk In The U.S. Crop Insurance Program, Bruce A. Babcock, Tian Yu Jul 2015

Drought Tolerance And Risk In The U.S. Crop Insurance Program, Bruce A. Babcock, Tian Yu

Iowa Ag Review

Are farmers paying too much for crop insurance? It sure seems so, at least in the Corn Belt. With the exception of 2008 when a large drop in price triggered payments, Corn Belt farmers have generally paid more into the program than they have gotten out, despite Congress’s intention that farmers get at least two dollars for each dollar they pay into the program.


Examining The Health Of The U.S. Crop Insurance Industry, Bruce A. Babcock Jul 2015

Examining The Health Of The U.S. Crop Insurance Industry, Bruce A. Babcock

Iowa Ag Review

In late September the Risk Management Agency (RMA) of USDA released the results of commissioned studies that calculated the rate of return that U.S. crop insurance companies have received from selling multi-peril crop insurance (MPCI). Since 2000, the average annual rate of return on equity has been 19 percent. The study also estimated that a reasonable rate of return over the same time period for this line of business would be about 11 percent. One straightforward interpretation of this difference is that since 2000, the crop insurance industry has received a rate of return that is 72 percent higher ...