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Social and Behavioral Sciences

2015

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Full-Text Articles in Insurance

Rural Disabled Medicare Beneficiaries Spend More Out-Of-Pocket Than Their Urban Counterparts, Erika C. Ziller Phd, Jennifer D. Lenardson Mhs, Andrew F. Coburn Phd Nov 2015

Rural Disabled Medicare Beneficiaries Spend More Out-Of-Pocket Than Their Urban Counterparts, Erika C. Ziller Phd, Jennifer D. Lenardson Mhs, Andrew F. Coburn Phd

Access / Insurance

The majority of Medicare beneficiaries experience gaps between the care they need and costs covered by Medicare and seek supplemental coverage to meet this gap, including private plans offered by former employers or purchased individually, or public coverage through Medicaid. Since rural beneficiaries are more likely to purchase supplemental indemnity coverage individually, to participate in Medicaid, or to go without supplemental coverage altogether, it is likely that their out-of-pocket spending differs from that of urban residents, although the magnitude and direction of these differences may vary for individual beneficiaries. This study used data from the 2006-2010 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey ...


Ssdi Reform: Promoting Return To Work Without Compromising Economic Security, Jagadeesh Gokhale Sep 2015

Ssdi Reform: Promoting Return To Work Without Compromising Economic Security, Jagadeesh Gokhale

Penn Wharton Public Policy Initiative

With the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) trust fund on the verge of depletion, Congress must enact structural reforms to the SSDI program that address and counter the rapid growth in SSDI enrollments in recent years. This brief details a work incentive program for SSDI beneficiaries, called the Generalized Benefit Offset (GBO), which would help get SSDI recipients back into the labor force, enhancing their own economic welfare while increasing economic output on a societal level.


What Drives Households To Buy Flood Insurance? Evidence From Georgia, Ajita Atreya, Susana Ferreira, Erwann Michel-Kerjan Sep 2015

What Drives Households To Buy Flood Insurance? Evidence From Georgia, Ajita Atreya, Susana Ferreira, Erwann Michel-Kerjan

Finance Papers

Benefiting from access to detailed data on the federally run National Flood Insurance Program for the entire state of Georgia, USA, we analyze residential flood insurance purchasing behavior in that state over more than three decades (1978–2010). The demand for flood insurance on an extensive margin, based on take-up rates, is found to be relatively price inelastic. Aligned with the behavioral economics literature, recent flood events temporarily increase purchases, but this effect fades after 3 years. We also find that the proportion of developed area in floodplains has a significant positive impact on insurance take-up rates. Contrary to what ...


Behavioral Economics And Insurance: Principles And Solutions, Howard Kunreuther, Mark V. Pauly Phd Aug 2015

Behavioral Economics And Insurance: Principles And Solutions, Howard Kunreuther, Mark V. Pauly Phd

Health Care Management Papers

It is easy for a consumer to make mistakes in insurance markets, especially when deciding whether to purchase insurance against low-probability, high-consequence (LP-HC) events. They have a hard time collecting and processing information to determine the likelihood and consequences of these risks which (by definition) they have had limited or no experience. Hence, people often rely on feelings and intuition rather than careful thought when it comes time to decide what coverage to purchase.


Giving A Voice To The Powerless: Participatory Monitoring & Evaluation As A Tool For Inclusive Development Through Microfinance, Evan T. Burke Aug 2015

Giving A Voice To The Powerless: Participatory Monitoring & Evaluation As A Tool For Inclusive Development Through Microfinance, Evan T. Burke

Capstone Collection

The greatest experts on the situation of the marginalized peoples of the world are the marginalized communities themselves. This paper explores how participatory monitoring & evaluation can be a powerful tool for giving voices to marginalized communities, ensuring that the voices of beneficiaries and local stakeholders are heard and inform sustainable project design. It analyzes a participatory monitoring and evaluation methodology implemented for women’s credit cooperatives in Gujarat, India by the Human Development & Research Centre, and examines lessons to be learned to design evaluations facilitating inclusive development.

Strategies for the monitoring and evaluation of microfinance have evolved along with the ...


Boom Times For Crop Insurance, Bruce A. Babcock Jul 2015

Boom Times For Crop Insurance, Bruce A. Babcock

Iowa Ag Review

Crop farmers are enjoying record high profi ts because of dramatically higher market prices. Farmers’ increased demand for land, seed, fertilizer, and machinery has resulted in higher prices and profi ts for sellers of these inputs as well. One industry that is also enjoying the higher crop prices is the crop insurance industry. It benefits from higher prices because the formulas used to determine industry revenue automatically generate higher expected subsidies as crop prices rise. Actual subsidies depend in part on crop losses, but administrative and operating subsidies are directly tied to crop prices. Figure 1 shows how total industry ...


Corn Belt Contributions To The Crop Insurance Industry, Bruce A. Babcock Jul 2015

Corn Belt Contributions To The Crop Insurance Industry, Bruce A. Babcock

Iowa Ag Review

The crop insurance industry enjoyed another banner year in 2007, collecting $6.5 billion in premiums yet paying out only $3.2 billion in losses. I estimate that the industry will collect a record $2.8 billion from taxpayers. In contrast, the net amount that farmers received from the program in 2007 was only $750 million. Interestingly, since the beginning of this decade, the $11.3 billion in net payments to farmers (indemnities received minus farmer-paid premiums) is about equal to the amount that taxpayers have paid the industry ($11.1 billion). Overall, taxpayers have spent more than $22 billion ...


Drought Tolerance And Risk In The U.S. Crop Insurance Program, Bruce A. Babcock, Tian Yu Jul 2015

Drought Tolerance And Risk In The U.S. Crop Insurance Program, Bruce A. Babcock, Tian Yu

Iowa Ag Review

Are farmers paying too much for crop insurance? It sure seems so, at least in the Corn Belt. With the exception of 2008 when a large drop in price triggered payments, Corn Belt farmers have generally paid more into the program than they have gotten out, despite Congress’s intention that farmers get at least two dollars for each dollar they pay into the program.


Examining The Health Of The U.S. Crop Insurance Industry, Bruce A. Babcock Jul 2015

Examining The Health Of The U.S. Crop Insurance Industry, Bruce A. Babcock

Iowa Ag Review

In late September the Risk Management Agency (RMA) of USDA released the results of commissioned studies that calculated the rate of return that U.S. crop insurance companies have received from selling multi-peril crop insurance (MPCI). Since 2000, the average annual rate of return on equity has been 19 percent. The study also estimated that a reasonable rate of return over the same time period for this line of business would be about 11 percent. One straightforward interpretation of this difference is that since 2000, the crop insurance industry has received a rate of return that is 72 percent higher ...


Medicare Secondary Payer And Settlement Delay, Eric Helland, Jonathan Klick Jul 2015

Medicare Secondary Payer And Settlement Delay, Eric Helland, Jonathan Klick

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

The Medicare Secondary Payer Act of 1980 and its subsequent amendments require that insurers and self-insured companies report settlements, awards, and judgments that involve a Medicare beneficiary to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The parties then may be required to compensate CMS for its conditional payments. In a simple settlement model, this makes settlement less likely. Also, the reporting delays and uncertainty regarding the size of these conditional payments are likely to further frustrate the settlement process. We provide results, using data from a large insurer, showing that, on average, implementation of the MSP reporting amendments led to ...


Disparities In Hospital Services Utilization Among Patients With Mental Health Issues: A Statewide Example Examining Insurance Status And Race Factors From 1999-2010, Viann N. Nguyen-Feng, Hind A. Beydoun, Michael K. Mcshane, James D. Blando Jul 2015

Disparities In Hospital Services Utilization Among Patients With Mental Health Issues: A Statewide Example Examining Insurance Status And Race Factors From 1999-2010, Viann N. Nguyen-Feng, Hind A. Beydoun, Michael K. Mcshane, James D. Blando

Community & Environmental Health Faculty Publications

There exist many disconnects between the mental and general health care sectors. However, a goal of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) of 2010 is to change this by improving insurance access and the intersection of mental and general health care. As insurance status intersects with race, the present study examines how race, insurance status, and hospital mental health services utilization differ across groups within the state of New Jersey. The present study aims to determine trends in hospital mental health care utilization by insurance status and race from 1999 to 2010. The rate of self-pay for mental health disorders in ...


Pharmacy Benefit Management: Are Reporting Requirements Pro- Or Anticompetitive?, Patricia M. Danzon Jun 2015

Pharmacy Benefit Management: Are Reporting Requirements Pro- Or Anticompetitive?, Patricia M. Danzon

Health Care Management Papers

The market-based US health care system relies on pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs) to control pharmaceutical costs, in contrast to most other countries that regulate drug prices and access. Optimal strucuturing and regulation of PBM contracts poses significant agency challenges for private and public payers. However, recent reporting requirements for PBMs may be counterproductive and reflect the interests of competitors rather than customers.


The Implications Of Self-Driving Cars On Insurance, Amanda Lobello May 2015

The Implications Of Self-Driving Cars On Insurance, Amanda Lobello

Honors Projects in Mathematics

Self-driving cars, also known as autonomous vehicles, are being researched and tested by automakers, technology industry leaders, and other institutions. Lawmakers and politicians are discussing the legislation that will affect the fate of such technology. Primary benefits include safety, mobility, free time, less traffic, and green effects. However, there are also obstacles to the implementation of self-driving vehicles including consumer acceptance, legal liability, and cost. With the potential shift in responsibility from driver to automaker, rating factors for insurance may change, weighing more heavily on the model of the car as a factor. The fate of auto insurance is in ...


Risk Misperception And Selection In Insurance Markets: An Application To Demand For Cancer Insurance, David S. Hales May 2015

Risk Misperception And Selection In Insurance Markets: An Application To Demand For Cancer Insurance, David S. Hales

UNLV Theses, Dissertations, Professional Papers, and Capstones

Spinnewijn (2013) posits that optimism about risk and the efficacy of risk-reducing effort could cause selection in insurance markets. We test for this using a survey of 474 subjects’ demand for hypothetical cancer insurance. We elicit perceptions of baseline cancer risk and control efficacy and combine these with subject-specific cancer risks predicted by the Harvard Cancer Risk Index to develop measures of baseline and control optimism. We find that only 23 percent of our subjects would purchase a fair insurance contract aligned to their true risk type. Of these subjects, 94 percent also overinvest in prevention, leading to advantageous selection.


Tort Reform And Accidental Deaths: Is There A Link?, Haley Tipsord Apr 2015

Tort Reform And Accidental Deaths: Is There A Link?, Haley Tipsord

Georgia State Undergraduate Research Conference

No abstract provided.


Value-Based Differential Pricing: Efficient Prices For Drugs In A Global Context, Patricia. M. Danzon, Adrian Towse, Jorge Mestre-Ferrandiz Mar 2015

Value-Based Differential Pricing: Efficient Prices For Drugs In A Global Context, Patricia. M. Danzon, Adrian Towse, Jorge Mestre-Ferrandiz

Health Care Management Papers

This paper analyzes pharmaceutical pricing between and within countries to achieve second-best static and dynamic efficiency. We distinguish countries with and without universal insurance, because insurance undermines patients' price sensitivity, potentially leading to prices above second-best efficient levels. In countries with universal insurance, if each payer unilaterally sets an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) threshold based on its citizens' willingness-to-pay for health; manufacturers price to that ICER threshold; and payers limit reimbursement to patients for whom a drug is cost-effective at that price and ICER, then the resulting price levels and use within each country and price differentials across countries are ...


Is There A Future For Employer- Sponsored Health Insurance?, Mark V. Pauly Mar 2015

Is There A Future For Employer- Sponsored Health Insurance?, Mark V. Pauly

Penn Wharton Public Policy Initiative

Over the next five years, the effects of the ACA on employer-sponsored insurance will be modest. In the longer run, there is greater potential for disruption, depending on how firms respond to the subsidies available on the exchanges for low-wage workers. In all, only about 15% of the workforce likely will be affected. The impacts of the ACA on firms will vary widely based on three main factors: 1) the size of the firm, 2) the average compensation within the firm, and 3) the degree to which wages within the firm are homogenous or heterogeneous. Keeping in mind that employees ...


Rural Implications Of Medicaid Expansion Under The Affordable Care Act, Erika C. Ziller Phd, Jennifer D. Lenardson Mhs, Andrew F. Coburn Phd Feb 2015

Rural Implications Of Medicaid Expansion Under The Affordable Care Act, Erika C. Ziller Phd, Jennifer D. Lenardson Mhs, Andrew F. Coburn Phd

Medicaid

In this brief, researchers from the Maine Rural Health Research Center (University of Southern Maine, Muskie School of Public Service) present findings from a SHARE-funded evaluation of the rural implications of Medicaid expansion under the ACA.

The authors examine the following issues:

  • The extent to which prior public health insurance expansions have covered rural populations
  • Whether rural residents who are expected to be newly eligible for Medicaid in 2014 differ from their urban counterparts
  • The extent to which rural individuals might differentially benefit from the ACA Medicaid expansion in light of the expansion becoming optional
  • Whether rural enrollees are likely ...


Conscience And Complicity: Assessing Pleas Of Religious Exemptions In Hobby Lobby'S Wake, Amy J. Sepinwall Jan 2015

Conscience And Complicity: Assessing Pleas Of Religious Exemptions In Hobby Lobby'S Wake, Amy J. Sepinwall

Legal Studies and Business Ethics Papers

In the paradigmatic case of conscientious objection, the objector claims that his religion forbids him from actively participating in a wrong (for example, by fighting in a war). In the religious challenges to the Affordable Care Act's employer mandate, on the other hand, employers claim that their religious convictions forbid them from merely subsidizing insurance through which their employees might commit a wrong (for example, by using contraception). The understanding of complicity underpinning these challenges is vastly more expansive than the standard that legal doctrine or moral theory contemplates. Courts routinely reject claims of conscientious objection to taxes that ...


Critical Analysis Of The Confounding Of Clinical Trials, Eleanor L. Jordan Jan 2015

Critical Analysis Of The Confounding Of Clinical Trials, Eleanor L. Jordan

Senior Honors Projects, 2010-current

To provide a comprehensive overview of issues confounding clinical trials, Chapter 2 will discuss the parties involved in the research and development of medications and detail the individual responsibilities of each. However, the ambition of these individual entities often produces a conflict of interest especially when profits are involved [9]. Organizations and individuals such as insurance corporations, pharmaceutical companies (sponsors), pharmacy benefit managers, investigators (doctors/medical professionals) and most importantly patients, are all involved in carrying out clinical research and have definitive responsibilities they are required to follow for unbiased results. However, many rules are overlooked and biases go unrecorded ...


Balancing Act: Successfully Combining Creativity And Accountability In The Practice Of Marriage And Family Therapy, Nathalie Duque Bello Jan 2015

Balancing Act: Successfully Combining Creativity And Accountability In The Practice Of Marriage And Family Therapy, Nathalie Duque Bello

Department of Family Therapy Theses and Dissertations

The conditions that allowed early MFTs the freedom to creatively explore different interventions and theories of change are no longer available in today’s mental health care system. Although there are many benefits to the structure of managed behavioral healthcare organizations, a thorough review of the literature demonstrates that many therapists working in managed care agencies struggle with maintaining their theoretical creativity, claiming third-party payers’ service requirements and paperwork a barrier to their creativity. A phenomenological transcendental research method was utilized to understand the phenomenon of successfully combining creativity and accountability in the practice of marriage and family therapy from ...


Does The Geographic Information Systems Benefit The Insurance Industry?, Andrew R. Brachear Jan 2015

Does The Geographic Information Systems Benefit The Insurance Industry?, Andrew R. Brachear

Masters Theses

This research is intended to determine if the insurance companies are benefiting from Geographic Information System technology in the insurance industry. This is based on the consumers' point of view through the use of research, survey results, and technology at the insurance company's disposal. Today, this technology is used in many different areas including renewable energy, delivery business, and city planning. Insurance companies use this technology in order to determine safe driving habits. Some examples include Progressive's Snapshot and State Farm's In-Drive. These devices are used to collect data on response time, speed, and breaking. This is ...