Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Insurance Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 15 of 15

Full-Text Articles in Insurance

Boom Times For Crop Insurance, Bruce A. Babcock Jul 2015

Boom Times For Crop Insurance, Bruce A. Babcock

Iowa Ag Review

Crop farmers are enjoying record high profi ts because of dramatically higher market prices. Farmers’ increased demand for land, seed, fertilizer, and machinery has resulted in higher prices and profi ts for sellers of these inputs as well. One industry that is also enjoying the higher crop prices is the crop insurance industry. It benefits from higher prices because the formulas used to determine industry revenue automatically generate higher expected subsidies as crop prices rise. Actual subsidies depend in part on crop losses, but administrative and operating subsidies are directly tied to crop prices. Figure 1 shows how total industry ...


Corn Belt Contributions To The Crop Insurance Industry, Bruce A. Babcock Jul 2015

Corn Belt Contributions To The Crop Insurance Industry, Bruce A. Babcock

Iowa Ag Review

The crop insurance industry enjoyed another banner year in 2007, collecting $6.5 billion in premiums yet paying out only $3.2 billion in losses. I estimate that the industry will collect a record $2.8 billion from taxpayers. In contrast, the net amount that farmers received from the program in 2007 was only $750 million. Interestingly, since the beginning of this decade, the $11.3 billion in net payments to farmers (indemnities received minus farmer-paid premiums) is about equal to the amount that taxpayers have paid the industry ($11.1 billion). Overall, taxpayers have spent more than $22 billion ...


Drought Tolerance And Risk In The U.S. Crop Insurance Program, Bruce A. Babcock, Tian Yu Jul 2015

Drought Tolerance And Risk In The U.S. Crop Insurance Program, Bruce A. Babcock, Tian Yu

Iowa Ag Review

Are farmers paying too much for crop insurance? It sure seems so, at least in the Corn Belt. With the exception of 2008 when a large drop in price triggered payments, Corn Belt farmers have generally paid more into the program than they have gotten out, despite Congress’s intention that farmers get at least two dollars for each dollar they pay into the program.


Examining The Health Of The U.S. Crop Insurance Industry, Bruce A. Babcock Jul 2015

Examining The Health Of The U.S. Crop Insurance Industry, Bruce A. Babcock

Iowa Ag Review

In late September the Risk Management Agency (RMA) of USDA released the results of commissioned studies that calculated the rate of return that U.S. crop insurance companies have received from selling multi-peril crop insurance (MPCI). Since 2000, the average annual rate of return on equity has been 19 percent. The study also estimated that a reasonable rate of return over the same time period for this line of business would be about 11 percent. One straightforward interpretation of this difference is that since 2000, the crop insurance industry has received a rate of return that is 72 percent higher ...


Crop Insurance In Iowa, Alejandro Plastina, Chad Hart Jan 2014

Crop Insurance In Iowa, Alejandro Plastina, Chad Hart

Agricultural Policy Review

Farmers across the nation rely heavily on crop insurance as a risk management tool—in Iowa alone over 93 percent of corn and soybean planted area was insured in 2014, but that participation rate hasn’t always been the case. Participation in crop insurance declined substantially in the early 1990s after the mandate that required producers to purchase crop insurance in 1989 and 1990 to collect drought assistance in 1988 dissipated.


Price Expectations And Risk Profiles Drive Commodity Program Choices, Alejandro Plastina, Chad Hart Jan 2014

Price Expectations And Risk Profiles Drive Commodity Program Choices, Alejandro Plastina, Chad Hart

Agricultural Policy Review

The optimal commodity program choice depends as much on the specific production system in each farm as on the producer’s expectations about future yields and prices. Furthermore, the risk profile of producers will weigh heavily in the decision. This article illustrates the role of price expectations and risk profiles in commodity program choice using the ISU Farm Bill Analyzer.


The Challenge Of Preserving And Expanding Affordable Health Care In Maine, Wendy Wolf Jan 2003

The Challenge Of Preserving And Expanding Affordable Health Care In Maine, Wendy Wolf

Maine Policy Review

Maine’s health care system is in crisis. The state’s health care expenditures represent the third highest percentage of Gross Domestic Product in the nation; state health care spending is projected to top $11 billion per year, or $8,291 per person per year, over the next seven years; businesses in Maine pay 12-23% more for coverage than the national and New England state averages; and, the state’s uninsured and vulnerable populations continue to grow. In this article, Wendy Wolf charts the rising cost of health care in Maine and the implications of these costs for all Mainers ...


The Changing Nature Of Long-Term Care In Maine, Paul Saucier, Julie Fralich Jan 2003

The Changing Nature Of Long-Term Care In Maine, Paul Saucier, Julie Fralich

Maine Policy Review

The increase in the proportion of older adults, many with one or more chronic medical conditions, will increase the demand for long-term care. Paul Saucier and Julie Fralich discuss the socio-demographic factors affecting long-term care policy, and describe various state and federal options for providing and financing long-term care. They note that Maine’s long-term care system has so far been able to absorb considerable growth in people by serving increasing numbers in lower-cost settings. Cost sharing has been introduced, and tax policy has been changed to provide incentives for long-term care insurance. Policymakers must now consider whether the current ...


Dirigo Health, Sharon Anglin Treat, Michael Brennan, Ann Woloson Jan 2003

Dirigo Health, Sharon Anglin Treat, Michael Brennan, Ann Woloson

Maine Policy Review

Maine’s pioneering Dirigo Health program aims at reducing health care costs, improving quality, and increasing access by providing health insurance coverage to all of Maine’s currently uninsured population. State senators Sharon Treat and Michael Brennan and co-author Ann Woloson provide an overview of the components, structure and financing of the program. They discuss some of the challenges and opportunities posed in Dirigo Health’s implementation, and give an insider’s perspective on the process by which the program was enacted.


Dirigo Health: Its Opportunities And Obstacles, Godfrey Wood Jan 2003

Dirigo Health: Its Opportunities And Obstacles, Godfrey Wood

Maine Policy Review

No abstract provided.


Dirigo Health: A Small Business Perspective, Deborah Cook Jan 2003

Dirigo Health: A Small Business Perspective, Deborah Cook

Maine Policy Review

In her commentary Deborah Cook, executive director of the Maine Small Business Alliance, discusses Dirigo Health from the viewpoint of small businesses, whose employees and families, along with the self-employed, represent the largest proportion of uninsured in Maine’s population. She notes that rising costs of health care and insurance are a major threat to the viability of small businesses.


Health Care Reform In Maine: Continuing The Dialogue, Robert Keller, Neil Rolde, Peter Hayes Jan 1996

Health Care Reform In Maine: Continuing The Dialogue, Robert Keller, Neil Rolde, Peter Hayes

Maine Policy Review

No abstract provided.


Maine’S Workers’ Compensation System: Is It Making The Grade?, Jonathan W. Reitman Jan 1996

Maine’S Workers’ Compensation System: Is It Making The Grade?, Jonathan W. Reitman

Maine Policy Review

Fundamental changes in Maine’s workers' compensation system were legislated four years ago. What impact have they had and what remains on the policy agenda? This article provides a comprehensive and balanced assessment of that reform effort, suggesting dramatic improvements in the system. But work remains: Vocational rehabilitation, labor-management collaboration, and cost-containment are especially in need of improvement.


The Importance Of Health Insurance Reform, Nancy Landon Kassebaum Jan 1995

The Importance Of Health Insurance Reform, Nancy Landon Kassebaum

Maine Policy Review

In her commentary, Republican Senator Nancy Kassebaum of Kansas outlines a proposed bipartisan health insurance reform act which she will introduce in the Senate next year.


A Crisis In Insurance, Benjamin Lipson Jan 1988

A Crisis In Insurance, Benjamin Lipson

New England Journal of Public Policy

As the life and health insurance industry evaluates its long-term financial goals, the cloud of Black Monday — October 19, 1987, the day the stock market collapsed — blurs its cherished investment income projections. With investment portfolios under siege, mutual life insurance companies and stock companies alike are wary of making policy-pricing miscalculations that could prove to be disastrous. As if that weren't enough, one single disease — acquired immunodeficiency syndrome — looms as the most serious threat to life and health insurers for the remainder of this century. The spread of the new disease has caused insurers to adjust their underwriting requirements ...