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Business Law, Public Responsibility, and Ethics Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

2005

Southern Cross University

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Business Law, Public Responsibility, and Ethics

Gambling Amongst Gaming Venue Employees: Counsellors’ Perspectives On Risk And Protective Factors In The Workplace, Nerilee Hing, Helen Breen Jan 2005

Gambling Amongst Gaming Venue Employees: Counsellors’ Perspectives On Risk And Protective Factors In The Workplace, Nerilee Hing, Helen Breen

School of Tourism and Hospitality Management

This paper reports on Stage One of a project examining the gambling behaviour of employees in Queensland gaming venues and how aspects of their workplace might influence that behaviour, to identify how gaming venues can provide a work environment that encourages responsible gambling amongst employees. From interviews with 32 gambling counsellors, 40 risk factors for gambling problems, 15 protective factors against gambling problems and 14 venue strategies for encouraging responsible gambling amongst employees were identified. A number of broad conclusions can be reached. First, staff who work in gaming venues appear an at-risk group for problem gambling. Second, this risk ...


Giving The Gamblers A Voice: The Perceived Efficacy Of Responsible Gambling Practices In Nsw Clubs, Nerilee Hing Jan 2005

Giving The Gamblers A Voice: The Perceived Efficacy Of Responsible Gambling Practices In Nsw Clubs, Nerilee Hing

School of Tourism and Hospitality Management

This paper analyses qualitative data gathered from 339 patrons of ten NSW clubs via a survey assessing their perceived efficacy of venue-based responsible gambling measures. Analysis of over 25,000 words of ‘additional comments’ from these patrons yielded 541 comments, subsequently grouped into 17 themes and 56 sub-themes. Each is summarised, drawing heavily on the respondents’ verbatim comments to convey the sentiments and emotions expressed. As such, this paper gives a voice to one important, but often overlooked, stakeholder group in the gambling debate – the gamblers themselves. Most respondents were critical of governments and gambling venues in their focus on ...