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Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Business Law, Public Responsibility, and Ethics

Ethical Distancing: Rationalizing Violations Of Organizational Norms, Jeffrey B. Kaufmann, Tim West, Sue Ravenscroft, Charles B. Shrader Oct 2005

Ethical Distancing: Rationalizing Violations Of Organizational Norms, Jeffrey B. Kaufmann, Tim West, Sue Ravenscroft, Charles B. Shrader

Management Publications

Recent work on moral reasoning has focused on the psychological relationship between the actor, the action and the outcome. The argument is that a tighter connection between these categories leads to more moral behavior. Using data from students who cheated on an exam, we extend this literature by delineating how people can rationalize non-moral behavior by loosening the above relationships. In particular, we found that students tried to distance themselves from the wrongfulness of cheating using four types of rationalization: separating themselves from the action, blaming a third-party for influencing the decision, re-defining the action as something good, and defining ...


Legitimacy, Interest Group Pressures And Change In Emergent Institutions: The Case Of Foreign Investors And Host Country Governments, Witold J. Henisz, Bennet A. Zelner Apr 2005

Legitimacy, Interest Group Pressures And Change In Emergent Institutions: The Case Of Foreign Investors And Host Country Governments, Witold J. Henisz, Bennet A. Zelner

Management Papers

We offer a simple model of policy making, emphasizing socialization and limits on human cognition to explicate mechanisms of change in emergent (as opposed to established) institutions. Emergent institutions are more susceptible to change, and their opponents may use frames or existing reference points to illustrate inconsistency with prevailing notions of legitimacy. Broader institutional structures and specific organizational characteristics moderate pressure for change. This perspective has novel implications for strategy and policy design.


The Impact Of Ownership Structure On Wage Intensity In Japanese Corporations, Toru Yoshikawa, Phillip H. Phan, Parthiban David Apr 2005

The Impact Of Ownership Structure On Wage Intensity In Japanese Corporations, Toru Yoshikawa, Phillip H. Phan, Parthiban David

Research Collection Lee Kong Chian School Of Business

The authors studied the effect of ownership structure on human capital investments as indicated by wage intensity, defined as the ratio of expenditure on employee wages to sales, in a sample of 996 Japanese manufacturing firms during their economic recession of 1998-2002. They found that domestic shareholders, with interests beyond financial considerations, enhance wage intensity, especially when performance is low, and thereby safeguard human capital investments. Foreign shareholders with sole interest in financial returns have an opposite effect; they reduce wage intensity when firm performance is low.


Europe, Spain, And The Future Of Spanish Multinational Firms, Mauro F. Guillén Jan 2005

Europe, Spain, And The Future Of Spanish Multinational Firms, Mauro F. Guillén

Management Papers

The last fifteen years or so have witnessed a major transformation of Spanish businesses. After decades of protectionism and isolation, virtually all of them are now exposed to the winds of international competition; nearly a thousand have invested abroad in order to exploit the opportunities inherent in operating across borders. As a result, Spain has become one of the ten largest foreign direct investors in the world, with key consequences for the country's economy, financial system, diplomacy, image and society, as well as for Europe.


Nonprofits At The Crossroad: Embrace Change, Learn To Compete, Art Stewart Dec 2004

Nonprofits At The Crossroad: Embrace Change, Learn To Compete, Art Stewart

Art Stewart

The tide of continuous change brought on by the impact of a global marketplace is impacting the fundamental way we conduct our relationships, commerce, and civic engagement as well as the formation and implementation of our public policy, and the manner in which we define and exercise our belief systems. Competition is now essential to acquiring what we need on both a personal and communal basis. We compete in the way we relate to each other - vying for attention and engagement, loyalty and trust, and physical needs. We compete in our civic engagement - striving for numbers of supporters, empathy for ...


"Myth & Mystique: Growth Brands Are All About Marketplace Behavior", Art Stewart Dec 2004

"Myth & Mystique: Growth Brands Are All About Marketplace Behavior", Art Stewart

Art Stewart

No abstract provided.


Re-Claiming Authentic Leadership For Nonprofit Sustainability, Art Stewart Dec 2004

Re-Claiming Authentic Leadership For Nonprofit Sustainability, Art Stewart

Art Stewart

In the past few years, we have witnessed stunning examples of great - and greatly flawed - leadership that has contributed to a new norm of regulation and accountability, breached stakeholder trust, and dubious public confidence. No consensus is needed to acknowledge that the nonprofit sector has suffered from a lack of leadership, whether it is social service agencies, advocacy organizations, charities and foundations, philanthropic institutions or associations. Many top executives of nonprofit organizations have displayed consistent shortcomings in vision, courage, responsibility, and commitment. Still too, many others have exercised impressive perseverance in the name of service, education, and social change that ...