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Business Law, Public Responsibility, and Ethics Commons

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Selected Works

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Jonathan GS Koppell

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Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Business Law, Public Responsibility, and Ethics

Global Governance Organizations: Legitimacy And Authority In Conflict, Jonathan Koppell Dec 2007

Global Governance Organizations: Legitimacy And Authority In Conflict, Jonathan Koppell

Jonathan GS Koppell

Global governance organizations (GGOs) are frequently maligned as both illegitimate and ineffective. With the growing prominence of entities that promulgate global rules governing trade, communications, finance, and transport, these shortcomings take on greater importance. This essay presents a theoretical framework to understand the challenge of legitimacy for GGOs. It argues that GGOs tend to face trade-offs between legitimacy and authority, but that widespread usages of these important terms conflate or confuse them and thus obscure critical issues in GGO politics. Once these terms are more clearly defined, we see more easily that GGOs must sometimes violate democratic norms, sacrificing equality ...


Political Control For China’S State-Owned Enterprises: Lessons From America’S Experience With Hybrid Organizations, Jonathan Koppell Mar 2007

Political Control For China’S State-Owned Enterprises: Lessons From America’S Experience With Hybrid Organizations, Jonathan Koppell

Jonathan GS Koppell

China’s reform of state-owned enterprises (SOEs) is intended to liberate the companies from bureaucratic control that hinders their management. Discussions of SOE reform, however, downplay the policy consequences. Can SOEs be “free” to succeed economically while some political control is maintained? Surprisingly, American experience with hybrid organizations—government-created companies that straddle the line between public and private—offers some precedent for managing the balance between political control and enterprise independence. Three strategies are derived for China. First, welfare functions must be stripped from SOEs and replaced by policy objectives compatible with commercial purposes. Second, reducing financial dependence on SOEs ...