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Full-Text Articles in Business

Do Start-Ups Pay Less?, M. Diane Burton, Michael S. Dahl, Olav Sorenson Oct 2018

Do Start-Ups Pay Less?, M. Diane Burton, Michael S. Dahl, Olav Sorenson

Articles and Chapters

The authors analyze Danish registry data from 1991 to 2006 to determine how firm age and firm size influence wages. Unadjusted statistics suggest that smaller firms paid less than larger firms paid, and that firm age had little or no bearing on wages. After adjusting for differences in the characteristics of employees hired by these firms, however, they observe both firm age and firm size effects. Larger firms paid more than did smaller firms for observationally equivalent individuals but, contrary to conventional wisdom, younger firms paid more than older firms. The size effect, however, dominates the age effect. Thus, although ...


Introduction To A Special Issue On The Impact Of Immigrant Legalization Initiatives: International Perspectives On Immigration And The World Of Work, Maria Lorena Cook, Shannon Gleeson, Kati L. Griffith, Lawrence M. Kahn Aug 2018

Introduction To A Special Issue On The Impact Of Immigrant Legalization Initiatives: International Perspectives On Immigration And The World Of Work, Maria Lorena Cook, Shannon Gleeson, Kati L. Griffith, Lawrence M. Kahn

Articles and Chapters

This article is the third in a series to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the ILR Review. The series features articles that analyze the state of research and future directions for important themes the journal has featured over its many years of publication. In this issue, we also feature a special cluster of articles and book reviews on one of the most critical labor market issues across the globe—the legalization and integration of immigrants into national labor markets.

Despite the urgent need for immigration reform in the United States, there is a paucity of US research that looks at ...


Learning To Become A Taste Expert, Kathryn A. Latour, John A. Deighton Jun 2018

Learning To Become A Taste Expert, Kathryn A. Latour, John A. Deighton

Articles and Chapters

Evidence suggests that consumers seek to become more expert about hedonic products to enhance their enjoyment of future consumption occasions. Current approaches to becoming expert center on cultivating an analytic mindset. In the present research the authors explore the benefit to enthusiasts of moving beyond analytics to cultivate a holistic style of processing. In the taste context the authors define holistic processing as non-verbal, imagery-based, and involving narrative processing. The authors conduct qualitative interviews with taste experts (Master Sommeliers) to operationalize the holistic approach to hedonic learning, and then test it against traditional analytic methods in a series of experiments ...


We Can Thank Harvey Weinstein For Doing What Congress And The Supreme Court Failed To Do, David S. Sherwyn, Paul Wagner Apr 2018

We Can Thank Harvey Weinstein For Doing What Congress And The Supreme Court Failed To Do, David S. Sherwyn, Paul Wagner

Articles and Chapters

While the years 2017 and 2018 will be remembered for numerous geo political and social movements, any retrospective of this time will include the issue of sexual harassment and the corresponding “Me Too” movement. In this time, sexual harassment has transformed from a workplace legal concept to an issue that is defining the fabric of the country. While no one could persuasively argue that sexual harassment has not expanded from its legal roots to a movement that transcends the law, the fact is that the concept is rooted and adjudicated in law. Sadly, the commentators and the popular press often ...


Cq: From The (New) Editor, J. Bruce Tracey Apr 2018

Cq: From The (New) Editor, J. Bruce Tracey

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] Great to be back! I am delighted to have the opportunity to take the reins of the Cornell Hospitality Quarterly (CQ) for a second term. I offer a huge and heartfelt thanks to Mike Lynn for his service and leadership. Mike has had a very successful 3 years at the helm, and his efforts have had an increasingly positive impact on the journal’s standing. The numbers look great, so the transition will be easy.


Summary Of Cq’S 2017 Submissions And Editorial Decisions, Michael Lynn Apr 2018

Summary Of Cq’S 2017 Submissions And Editorial Decisions, Michael Lynn

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] In 2017, the Cornell Hospitality Quarterly (CQ) received 262 new submissions with 258 receiving editorial decisions within the year. Thirty-eight manuscripts were accepted for publication last year. Some of the new submission are still under invited revision and some of the acceptances were of manuscripts originally submitted in 2016, so dividing 38 by 258 to get an acceptance rate is not fully appropriate, but it does provide a reasonable approximation of the journal’s acceptance rate. By that calculation, CQ’s acceptance rate was 15% last year. Sixty percent of new submissions were desk-rejected last year—usually within 2 ...


Cq Reviewers’ Reactions To My Editorial Policies, Michael Lynn Feb 2018

Cq Reviewers’ Reactions To My Editorial Policies, Michael Lynn

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] Peer review is an important part of the scientific process. It helps to separate good research from bad so that scarce journal pages and readers’ attention go the former rather than the latter. As editor of Cornell Hospitality Quarterly (CQ), I am particularly dependent on reviewers’ help because CQ is a cross-disciplinary journal whose submissions cover literatures and methodologies that vastly exceed my ken.


Living Without Otas—Goodbye Columbus: Putting The Jenie Back In The Bottle, Chris K. Anderson, Saram Han Feb 2018

Living Without Otas—Goodbye Columbus: Putting The Jenie Back In The Bottle, Chris K. Anderson, Saram Han

Articles and Chapters

A recent Cornell Hospitality Quarterly article highlighted a unique natural experiment where an entire city had all its hotel delisted from all online travel agents for more than 4 years. The article provides great background to the delisting and highlights the impacts on hotel revenue and accommodation taxes for the county. The article estimates that even though the hotels relisted at all online travel agents (OTAs), there was a substantial gain to both hotels and accommodation tax collectors during the OTA delisting period. The impact estimates are based solely on the loss of demand realized in neighboring Phenix City, AL ...


Natural Occupancy Shifts In Hotel Markets, Bram Gallagher, John B. Corgel Jan 2018

Natural Occupancy Shifts In Hotel Markets, Bram Gallagher, John B. Corgel

Articles and Chapters

The natural occupancy rate underpins room price adjustment models for hotel market evaluations; however, models that assume that this rate is time invariant and everywhere constant may introduce error when forecasting future real room rates and benchmarking market strength. We use monthly STR room rate and occupancy data for five large U.S. metropolitan hotel markets to estimate natural occupancy differences in time and across markets. The notion of a time-varying natural occupancy aligns with changing market equilibrium. When aggregating over the entire sample, long-run average occupancy is reasonably good approximation of estimated constant natural occupancy. We use a Markov ...


Resolving Discrimination Complaints In Employment Arbitration: An Analysis Of The Experience In The Securities Industry, J. Ryan Lamare, David B. Lipsky Jan 2018

Resolving Discrimination Complaints In Employment Arbitration: An Analysis Of The Experience In The Securities Industry, J. Ryan Lamare, David B. Lipsky

Articles and Chapters

This article empirically examines whether employment discrimination claims differ from other types of disputes resolved through arbitration. Whether arbitration is appropriate for resolving violations of anti-discrimination statutes at work is a focus of ongoing policy debates. Yet empirical scholarship has rarely considered whether different types of complaints might have distinct characteristics and receive varied outcomes in arbitration. The authors analyze all of the employment arbitration awards for cases filed between 1991 and 2006 in the financial services industry to determine whether differences in the type of allegation affect award outcomes. They also examine the effects of the financial industry’s ...


Levels Of Abstraction In Legal Thinking, Michael Evan Gold Jan 2018

Levels Of Abstraction In Legal Thinking, Michael Evan Gold

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] This article applies the concept of levels of abstraction to legal thinking. Perhaps the most important use of the concept is to constrain judicial lawmaking in a principled way.

Level of abstraction refers to:

  • the numbers of persons and transactions that generate an issue,

  • the numbers of persons and transactions of which a piece of evidence is true,

  • the numbers of persons and transactions to which an argument applies, and

  • the numbers of persons and transactions that are affected by the resolution of an issue.

In general, the more persons and transactions to which an issue and its resolution ...


Should Cookie Monster Adopt A Healthy Lifestyle Or Continue To Indulge? Insights Into Brand Icons, Altaf Merchant, Kathryn A. Latour, John B. Ford, Michael S. Latour Jan 2018

Should Cookie Monster Adopt A Healthy Lifestyle Or Continue To Indulge? Insights Into Brand Icons, Altaf Merchant, Kathryn A. Latour, John B. Ford, Michael S. Latour

Articles and Chapters

Developing a brand icon has been a way for marketers to humanize and forge relationships with consumers. Icon development takes time. During this time, marketers have to face how much they stay true and consistent with their icons and how much they allow their icons to adapt to cultural changes in the marketplace. Little is known about how consumers respond to changing icons, and even less is known about whether there may be certain consumer groups that are more or less receptive to such changes. Four experiments and qualitative interviews were undertaken to gain insights into these issues. People who ...


Sizing Up Worker Center Income (2008-2014): A Study Of Revenue Size, Stability, And Streams, Leslie Gates, Kati L. Griffith, Jonathan Kim, Zane Mokhiber, Joseph C. Bazler, Austin Case Jan 2018

Sizing Up Worker Center Income (2008-2014): A Study Of Revenue Size, Stability, And Streams, Leslie Gates, Kati L. Griffith, Jonathan Kim, Zane Mokhiber, Joseph C. Bazler, Austin Case

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] Since the publication of Janice Fine’s path-breaking book, Worker Centers: Communities at the Edge of the Dream in 2006, scholars and commentators on the left and the right of the political spectrum have grappled with how to characterize these emergent worker organizations on the US labor relations scene. This chapter deepens our understanding of the nature of worker centers by examining the funding trends that underlay the wide range of experimental organizing and advocacy strategies highlighted in other chapters of this volume. Undoubtedly, to emerge and survive, these organizations need money (Bobo and Pabellon 2016). But how financially ...


Learning, Training, And Development In Organizations: Emerging Trends, Recent Advances, And Future Directions, Bradford S. Bell, Ozias A. Moore Jan 2018

Learning, Training, And Development In Organizations: Emerging Trends, Recent Advances, And Future Directions, Bradford S. Bell, Ozias A. Moore

Articles and Chapters

Dramatic changes have occurred in learning, training, and development in organizations in recent years. This chapter examines the implications of these changes for research in four areas: (1) training design and delivery, (2) team training and development, (3) training transfer, and (4) training evaluation. We suggest that research in these areas not only has been most heavily impacted by recent trends in training and development but also can help guide the field as it responds to emerging opportunities and challenges. We review recent research that advances our understanding of how to design and deliver training to meet the needs of ...


Cq Authors’ Reactions To My Editorial Policies And Practices, Michael Lynn Nov 2017

Cq Authors’ Reactions To My Editorial Policies And Practices, Michael Lynn

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] Academic journals can only publish what is submitted to them, so their editors need numerous high quality submissions to consistently publish high quality articles. To encourage more high quality submissions to Cornell Hospitality Quarterly (CQ), I implemented a number of what I considered to be author-friendly editorial policies and practices when I became editor.


The Precarity Of Temporality: How Law Inhibits Immigrant Worker Claims, Kati L. Griffith, Shannon Gleeson Oct 2017

The Precarity Of Temporality: How Law Inhibits Immigrant Worker Claims, Kati L. Griffith, Shannon Gleeson

Articles and Chapters

In this article, we propose that temporary immigrant workers in the United States face unique law-induced challenges to claimsmaking when compared to other categories of workers with precarious immigration statuses, such as unauthorized workers and H-2 guest workers. We present a systematic comparison of each group, drawing on a review of the existing literature and a new pilot study, to examine how the challenges facing each set of immigrants overlap in some ways, but are unique in others. We conclude that particular differences in U.S. immigration law categories (unauthorized, H-2 guest workers, and temporary immigrant workers) may shape how ...


Categorizing Cruise Lines By Passenger Perceived Experience, Yiwei Li, Robert J. Kwortnik Jr. Sep 2017

Categorizing Cruise Lines By Passenger Perceived Experience, Yiwei Li, Robert J. Kwortnik Jr.

Articles and Chapters

In the travel and hospitality industries, categorization of products, brands, and experiences permit efficient comparison and evaluation that aids decision making—from consumer choice to organizational strategy. However, categories often involve self-categorization (e.g., marketer defined) that may not reflect the reality of dynamic markets and industries. In this study of the cruise industry, we derive a new categorization approach using consumer perceptions of their cruise experiences to challenge a long-standing industry typology. Results using a variety of statistical tests of J.D. Power data from more than 3,000 cruisers yield a new and more informative category structure and ...


Not Merely A Matter Of Drawing Arrows: The Empirical Consequences Of Measurement Model Specification And Recommendations For Practice, Elisa K. Chan, Michael C. Sturman, Sanghee Park, Chelsea Vanderpool Aug 2017

Not Merely A Matter Of Drawing Arrows: The Empirical Consequences Of Measurement Model Specification And Recommendations For Practice, Elisa K. Chan, Michael C. Sturman, Sanghee Park, Chelsea Vanderpool

Articles and Chapters

Understanding measurement model specification is especially important for hospitality research due to its cross-disciplinary nature and the prevalence of measures used in the field which are often central to the formative versus reflective debate (e.g., SERVQUAL, socioeconomic status). The current study contributes to this topic by providing empirically based prescriptive advice to drive better measurement model specification. Specifically, the decision-making procedures developed by this study can complement theoretical reasons for a model choice as well as help determine a correct model choice when theories are equivocal or non-existent. This study combines actual and simulated data to show that model ...


Multi-Click Attribution In Sponsored Search Advertising: An Empirical Study In Hospitality Industry, Chris K. Anderson, Ming Cheng Aug 2017

Multi-Click Attribution In Sponsored Search Advertising: An Empirical Study In Hospitality Industry, Chris K. Anderson, Ming Cheng

Articles and Chapters

Sponsored search advertising has become a dominant form of advertising for many firms in the hospitality vertical, with Priceline and Expedia each spending in excess of US$2 billion in online advertising in 2015. Given the competition in online advertising, it has become essential for advertisers to know how effectively to allocate financial resources to keywords. Central to budget allocation for keywords is an attribution of revenue (from converted ads) to the keywords generating consumer interest. Conventional wisdom suggests several ways to attribute revenues in the sponsored search advertising domain (e.g., last-click, first & last-click, or evenly distributed approach). We ...


More Multi-Study Articles Wanted, Michael Lynn Aug 2017

More Multi-Study Articles Wanted, Michael Lynn

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] Cornell Hospitality Quarterly (CQ) readers may have noticed that the lead article for this issue and for each of the previous two issues has been a multi-study paper. The lead article for the next issue of CQ will also be a multi-study paper, and this will be true for future issues as long as I have enough accepted multi-study papers to make it so. I want to use this editorial to explain my preference for multi-study articles and to encourage CQ authors to write and submit more of them.


The Impact Of Supertasters On Taste Test And Marketing Outcomes: How An Innate Characteristic Shapes Taste, Preference, Experience, And Behavior, Kathryn A. Latour, Michael S. Latour, Brian Wansink Jul 2017

The Impact Of Supertasters On Taste Test And Marketing Outcomes: How An Innate Characteristic Shapes Taste, Preference, Experience, And Behavior, Kathryn A. Latour, Michael S. Latour, Brian Wansink

Articles and Chapters

This article introduces advertisers to a new segmentation technique based on an individual’s inherited taste sensitivity—that is, the “supertaster.” Three studies demonstrate that this inherited supertaster difference can explain blind taste-test anomalies, such as the Pepsi Challenge; heightened brand loyalty; and a reduced sensitivity to peripheral product cues, such as visual variations. These findings underscore a new vein of segmentation that has great promise for explaining variance in lab, expert, and crowd-sourced evaluations involving matters of taste.


Web-Based Recruiting's Impact On Organizational Image And Familiarity: Too Much Of A Good Thing?, Melissa Intindola, Gabriella Lewis, Carol Flinchbaugh, Sean Rogers Ph.D. Jun 2017

Web-Based Recruiting's Impact On Organizational Image And Familiarity: Too Much Of A Good Thing?, Melissa Intindola, Gabriella Lewis, Carol Flinchbaugh, Sean Rogers Ph.D.

Articles and Chapters

Little is known about the efficacy of many of the newer forms of online recruitment. Using a quasi-experimental design, we tested the impact of individual exposure to corporate recruitment websites and Facebook on perceptions of organizational familiarity and organizational image over time. Most interestingly, we found evidence of a curvilinear or non-linear relationship between frequency of exposure to organizational communications and perceptions of organizational familiarity across time. Implications of our findings for HR theory and practice are discussed.


Unexpected Inflation, Capital Structure And Real Risk-Adjusted Firm Performance, Jamie Alcock, Eva Steiner Jun 2017

Unexpected Inflation, Capital Structure And Real Risk-Adjusted Firm Performance, Jamie Alcock, Eva Steiner

Articles and Chapters

Managers can improve real risk-adjusted firm performance by matching nominal assets with nominal liabilities, thereby reducing the sensitivity of real risk-adjusted returns to unexpected inflation. The Net Asset Value (NAV) of US equity Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs) serves as a good proxy for nominal assets and accordingly we use a sample of US REITs to test our hypothesis. We find that for the firms in our sample: (i) their real, risk-adjusted performance, and (ii) their inflation hedging qualities are inversely related to deviations from this “matching-nominals" argument. In addition to providing managers with a vehicle to maximise real, risk-adjusted ...


Trading In The Presence Of Short-Lived Private Information: Evidence From Analyst Recommendation Changes, Ohad Kadan, Roni Michaely, Pamela Moulton May 2017

Trading In The Presence Of Short-Lived Private Information: Evidence From Analyst Recommendation Changes, Ohad Kadan, Roni Michaely, Pamela Moulton

Articles and Chapters

We use a proprietary dataset to test the implications of several asymmetric information models on how short-lived private information affects trading strategies and liquidity provision. Our identification rests on information acquisition before analyst recommendations are publically announced. We provide the first empirical evidence supporting theoretical predictions that early-informed traders “sell the news” after “buying the rumor.” Further, we find distinct profit-taking patterns across different classes of institutions. Uninformed institutions, but not individuals, emerge as de-facto liquidity providers to better-informed institutions. Placebo tests confirm that these trading patterns are unique to situations in which some investors have a short-lived informational advantage.


The Warm Glow Of Restaurant Checkout Charity, Michael D. Giebelhausen, Benjamin Lawrence, Haeeun Helen Chun, Liwu Hsu May 2017

The Warm Glow Of Restaurant Checkout Charity, Michael D. Giebelhausen, Benjamin Lawrence, Haeeun Helen Chun, Liwu Hsu

Articles and Chapters

Checkout charity is a phenomenon whereby frontline employees (or self-service technologies) solicit charitable donations from customers during the payment process. Despite its growing ubiquity, little is known about this salient aspect of the service experience. The present research examines checkout charity in the context of fast-food restaurants and finds that, when customers donate, they experience a “warm glow” that mediates a relationship between donating and store repatronage. Study 1 utilizes three scenario-based experiments to explore the phenomenon across different charities and different participant populations using both self-selection and random assignment designs. Study 2 replicates with a field study. Study 3 ...


Superbugs Versus Outsourced Cleaners: Employment Arrangements And The Spread Of Health Care-Associated Infections, Adam Seth Litwin, Ariel C. Avgar, Edmund R. Becker May 2017

Superbugs Versus Outsourced Cleaners: Employment Arrangements And The Spread Of Health Care-Associated Infections, Adam Seth Litwin, Ariel C. Avgar, Edmund R. Becker

Articles and Chapters

On any given day, about one in 25 hospital patients in the United States has a health care–associated infection (HAI) that the patient contracts as a direct result of his or her treatment. Fortunately, the spread of most HAIs can be halted through proper disinfection of surfaces and equipment. Consequently, cleaners—“environmental services” (EVS) in hospital parlance—must take on the important task of defending hospital patients (as well as staff and the broader community) from the spread of HAIs. Despite the importance of this task, hospitals frequently outsource this function, increasing the likelihood that these workers are under-rewarded ...


Should U.S. Restaurants Abandon Tipping? A Review Of The Issues And Evidence, Michael Lynn May 2017

Should U.S. Restaurants Abandon Tipping? A Review Of The Issues And Evidence, Michael Lynn

Articles and Chapters

Recent interest in replacing tipping with service charges or higher service-inclusive menu pricing prompts a review of empirical evidence on the advantages and disadvantages to restaurants of these different compensation systems. The evidence indicates that these different systems affect the attraction and retention of service workers, the satisfaction of customers with service, the actual and perceived costs of eating out, and the costs of hiring employees and doing business. However, I come away from the data believing that biggest reason for restaurateurs to replace tipping is that it takes revenue away from them in the form of lower prices and ...


Replicating And Extending Our Understanding Of How Managers Can Adjust The “Warm Glow Thermostat”, Michael D. Giebelhausen, Haeeun Helen Chun May 2017

Replicating And Extending Our Understanding Of How Managers Can Adjust The “Warm Glow Thermostat”, Michael D. Giebelhausen, Haeeun Helen Chun

Articles and Chapters

This article presents four studies that replicate and extend a recent article examining how guest participation in voluntary green programs (e.g., towel reuse) increases service satisfaction by evoking a “warm glow” response. Importantly for managers, we not only replicate across new hospitality and service contexts but also conceptualize alternative incentive paradigms, and test alternative mediators. In particular, we reconceptualize the “self-benefiting” versus “other-benefiting” incentive structure presented by Giebelhausen, Chun, Cronin, and Hult to consider “virtue,” “vice,” and “cash” incentives (i.e., three different types of self-benefiting incentives). The results provide managers with a better understanding of how they should ...


The Effect Of Cost Of Living On Employee Wages In The Hospitality Industry, Michael C. Sturman, Andrey D. Ukhov, Sanghee Park May 2017

The Effect Of Cost Of Living On Employee Wages In The Hospitality Industry, Michael C. Sturman, Andrey D. Ukhov, Sanghee Park

Articles and Chapters

This study examines the effect of cost of living (COL) on employee wages in the hotel industry. Although prior research clearly indicates that COL and wages are positively related, there is a lack of research explicitly considering the specific nature of the relationship between COL and wages, and potential moderators to the relationship. Using a dataset containing information on 97 jobs over 67 cities, our study shows that while there is a positive effect of COL on wages, the adjustment is not equal in magnitude to the difference that the COL levels would indicate. Furthermore, the effect of COL decreases ...


Summary Of Cq’S 2016 Submissions And Editorial Decisions, Michael Lynn May 2017

Summary Of Cq’S 2016 Submissions And Editorial Decisions, Michael Lynn

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] In 2016, Cornell Hospitality Quarterly (CQ) received 280 new submissions with 271 receiving editorial decisions within the year. Twenty-five submissions were accepted for publication last year. Some of the new submissions are still under invited revision and some of the acceptances were of manuscripts originally submitted in 2015, so dividing 25 by 271 to get an acceptance rate is not fully appropriate, but it does provide a reasonable approximation of the journal’s acceptance rate. By that calculation, CQ’s acceptance rate is 9%. Other, more complicated but arguably more appropriate calculations put the journal’s acceptance rate at ...