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Selling Western Australian Wool To The World, Georgina Wilson Jan 1998

Selling Western Australian Wool To The World, Georgina Wilson

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

Western Australia supplies 14 per cent of the worls's apparel wool and Agriculture WA's Wool Program has been working to raise the State's profile as a consistent supplier of high quality fibre to the world markets. It's a slow process in a very traditional industry, but modern measurement and computers are useful tools as Georgina Wilson explains.


Beef : Meating The Market, Greg Sawyer, Richard Morris, Geoff Tudor Jan 1996

Beef : Meating The Market, Greg Sawyer, Richard Morris, Geoff Tudor

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

Nearly half of Western Australia's beef production is consumed on the domestic market, but the scene is changing rapidly.

In this article Greg Sawyer, Richard Morris and Geoff Tudor review information on production systems performance, and carcase and quality measurements that may well serve wider market opportunities in the future.


Positive Price Outlook For Wheat : Implications For Wa Agriculture, Alan Haagensen, Ian Wilkinson Jan 1996

Positive Price Outlook For Wheat : Implications For Wa Agriculture, Alan Haagensen, Ian Wilkinson

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

After a 40 year period over which wheat prices have dropped by an average of 2.7 per cent annually in real terms, fundamental changes in wheat supply and demand look set to reverse this trend. It is possible that real prices could increase by as much as 4 per cent anually in the medium term.

Alan Haagensen and Ian Wilkinson look at the forecasts for wheat prices and outline the forces that will influence world supply and demands for wheat.


Something Fishy Is Going On - Aquaculture, David Berry Jan 1996

Something Fishy Is Going On - Aquaculture, David Berry

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

Aquaculture id Australia's fastest growing primary industry. Product from fish farms is currently valued at $399 million, forecast to exceed $5oo million by 2000.

Whilst the figure pales into insignificance alongside world production (about $45 billion) it does represent a huge window of opportunity for prospective investors and for Australian primary producers who are keen to diversify.

David Berry reports on the prospects for yabbie and marron farming in Western Australia.


A Measure Of Justice For Western Australian Wools, John Stanton Mar 1995

A Measure Of Justice For Western Australian Wools, John Stanton

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

Western Australian wools are sometimes perceived as inferior to those from eastern States, and this perception has often been reflected in price. For the first time a detailed comparison of the characteristics of our wool with the rest of the country has been undertaken. It shows that Western Australian wools are sometimes different from their eastern counterparts, but not necessarily 'inferior'. Overcoming these industry perceptions of inferiority is probably our biggest challenge, according to JOHN STANTON.


Beefing Up Our Prospects, Trevor Boughton, Brad Mccormick Mar 1995

Beefing Up Our Prospects, Trevor Boughton, Brad Mccormick

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

In the global fish pond the Western Australian beef industry is a minnow. Production is only 5.5 per cent of Australia's total and around 2 per cent that of the United States. Our output has remained static for the last decade while competition throughout the world has expanded. Moving forward to share the benefits of growing world markets or being left behind is the long-term choice facing the industry, according to TREVOR BOUGHTON and BRAD McCORMICK.


Pulses : Profitable New Crops For The Wheatbelt, Kadambot Siddique, Stephen Loss, Ian Pritchard Jan 1995

Pulses : Profitable New Crops For The Wheatbelt, Kadambot Siddique, Stephen Loss, Ian Pritchard

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

Narrow-leafed lupins have beeb produced on sandy acid soils throughout the wheatbelt for more than two decades. However, the wheatbelt contains large areas ofsoilsnot suited to narrow-leafed lupins. For several years reasearchers have been examining alternatives to narrow-leafed lupins for these soils.

Kadambot Siddique, Stephen Loss and Ian Prichard look at production of these new grain legumes, known as pulses.


Sharing Information Benefits The Meat Industry, Michael Paton Jan 1995

Sharing Information Benefits The Meat Industry, Michael Paton

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

Cronic health problems of livestock, seldom detected on farms, reduce the efficiency of abattoirs and returns to producers. But a major project providing information to producers from abattoirs is indicating how everyone could benefit from feedback.


Holding Our Edge In Noodle Wheat, Graham Crosbie Jan 1994

Holding Our Edge In Noodle Wheat, Graham Crosbie

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

For many years, the Japanese milling and noodle industries have regarded Australian Standard White (ASW) wheat from Western Australia as the best in the world for the manufacture of white, salted Japanese noodles known as 'udon' (pronounced oo-don).

Recently, the Australian Wheat Board has also developed a significant market for this wheat type in South Korea, where it has been readily accepted for the production of Korean dried noodles.

The Wheat Board has estimated the total market demand from Japan and South Korea for this type of wheat to be 1.0-1.2 million tonnes, equivalent to about 20-25 per ...


Cauliflower Exports Show Strong Growth, Dennis Phillips Jan 1994

Cauliflower Exports Show Strong Growth, Dennis Phillips

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

Cauliflowers were Western Australia's second most valuable horticultural export crop after carrots in 1993-94 with 11,593 tonnes exported for an estimated FOB value of $12.9 million.

Exports have increased 89 per cent in the last five years with spectacular growth in the January to March period. Western Australian exporters have effectively displaced Taiwan from the Singapore and Malaysian markets in this period to become year-round suppliers.

The crop is exported fresh by air or sea with Singapore and Malaysia accounting for more than 90 per cent of sales. Other traditional markets include Hong Kong and Brunei with ...


Awassi Fat Tails : A Chance For Premium Exports, Fiona Sunderman, Michael Johns Jan 1994

Awassi Fat Tails : A Chance For Premium Exports, Fiona Sunderman, Michael Johns

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

Most prople have heard of the Awassi, even if they have never seen one. This unique breed of fat tail sheep, imported into Astralia in 1987, was released from quarantine for commercial development nearly 12 months ago. Its supporters believe Awassis could form the basis of a high-value export industry while replacing imports. Developments over the next few years will test its potential and should result in the Awassi playing an important role in an increasingly diversified Australian farming scene.


Beef Farms : Thriving Profits To Expensive Lifestyles, Bevan Kingdon, Greg Sawyer Jan 1994

Beef Farms : Thriving Profits To Expensive Lifestyles, Bevan Kingdon, Greg Sawyer

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

Low wool prices in the last few years have stimulated interest in beef production in many areas of the State. Market sales at $500 and above for vealers sound attractive, but profitability of farms varies greatly. A BeefFarm Survey conducted by the Department of Agriculture has some interesting preliminary findings. Based on fairly modest returns for the operator's time, some farms are actually losing rather than making money on their beef enterprise, although potential profits are sizeable with good management. Interestingly, the biggest farms are not always the most efficient.


Diversification In The Woolbelt, John Allen Jan 1994

Diversification In The Woolbelt, John Allen

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

The productivity and diversification initiative for wool growers incorporates two leves of diversification.

Greatest emphasis is placed on industry wide increases in cropping intensity and in the range of crop types grown.

The second level involves non-traditional, alternative enterprises, each offering prospects for expansion of a limited number of wool growing businesses, suited to particular parts of the woolbelt.

The alternative enterprises include floriculture, aquaculture, export hay, farm tourism, commercial timber, horticulture and new animal industries.


Tough Times Call For A Review Of Farm Business Performance, Martin Van Bueren, John Young Jan 1994

Tough Times Call For A Review Of Farm Business Performance, Martin Van Bueren, John Young

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

Most Australian farm businesses specialising in wool production are operating at a loss at current wool prices. After both short term operating and long term costs of capital depreciation are accounted for, only a small number of wool growers are able to make a profit with the wool market indicator below 500c/kg.

Poor prices have stimulated wool growers to review their operations and look to ways of improving cash flow in the short term, such as diversifying into cropping. The downturn should also prompt growers to address the longer term trends of declining terms of trade and historically poor ...


New Lamb Marketing Opportunities, Tim Marshall Jan 1994

New Lamb Marketing Opportunities, Tim Marshall

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

The changes to the future operations of the Western Australian Meat Marketing Corporation will provide increased opportunities for prime lamb producers.

In summary, these changes are the removal of acquisition from the domestic market while retaining it for lambs destined for export, and the establishment of the Corporation as a single desk seller on the export market.

This should result in increased domestic consumption of lamb, less reliance on lower priced export markets, a change in the type of lamb produced, and a reduction of imports of lamb from the Eastern States.


Mango Exports From Western Australia, Peter Johnson, John Gallagher, Terry Hill Jan 1993

Mango Exports From Western Australia, Peter Johnson, John Gallagher, Terry Hill

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

The Department of Agriculture has been at the forefront in developing a mango industry in Western Australia.

In Camarvon, the Department is concentrating on developing an export industry, while in the Ord River Irrigation Area trials have identified suitable domestic and export varieties for that environment.

The effect of planting density, hedging and pruning techniques on yield is being examined. Research has also started on identifying superior selections of the Kensington Pride variety, the most commercially important variety in Australia. The aim is to improve fruit quality, bearing reliability, and to extend the production season..


Export Of Asparagus From The Ord River, John Bonnardeaux, Chris Robinson Jan 1993

Export Of Asparagus From The Ord River, John Bonnardeaux, Chris Robinson

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

Fresh asparagus is presently supplied to Australian markets from August to March from temperate regions. For the remainder of the year, there is no significant production of fresh spears in Australia.

Recent research in Taiwan, Zambia and Zimbabwe has indicated quality asparagus can be grown in tropical and subtropical regions. The harvest period can be manipulated by withholding irrigation water and cutting fems to make spears grow out-of-season.


A Bright Future For Export Plums, Ric Engel, Glynn Ward Jan 1993

A Bright Future For Export Plums, Ric Engel, Glynn Ward

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

Western Australia's stone fruit industry is relatively small by Australian and world standards owing to its small domestic market and past uncertainties with export. However, the industry is expanding to take advantage of growing markets in south-east Asia. It has adopted new production and marketing technology and is developing new varieties to meet the demand.

The future for our export plums has never been as promising as it is today. This is linked to fruit quality because markets are fickle and highly sensitive to poor quality fruit.

The introduction of a Quality Management Program in 199~91 helped the ...


Should We Export Our Native Birds?, Ross Kingwell Jan 1993

Should We Export Our Native Birds?, Ross Kingwell

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

The export of Australia's native birds is prohibited by the Wildlife Protection (Regulation of Exports and Imports) Act 1982. A review of the Act in 1991 has not led to any relaxation of the export ban.

However, the review recommended that government examine "the practical aspects of establishing a fully funded administrative control mechanism to allow strictly regulated commercial exports of a limited number of species of captivebred native birds which are not endangered or threatened". In making this recommendation, the report acknowledged there may be a case for highly regulated export of some native bird species.

This article ...


Production Of High-Value Wheats : One Sustainable Answer To The Cost:Price Squeeze, Wal Anderson, Alan Peggs, Doug Sawkins Jan 1993

Production Of High-Value Wheats : One Sustainable Answer To The Cost:Price Squeeze, Wal Anderson, Alan Peggs, Doug Sawkins

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

Farmers and scientists alike over the past decade have sought to address the declining terms of farm trade (the cost.price squeeze) by increasing wheat yields in ways that will ensure both their economic and ecological survival. Nevertheless, costs have continued to increase as a proportion of the value of the product.

Many farmers have increased their wheat yields substantially and the industry as a whole is more conscious of the quality of its product.

Over the past 10 years or more there has been intense interest in, and considerable adoption of. conservation farming techniques such as minimum tillage, residue ...


Export Of Rockmelons From The Ord River, John Bonnardeaux Jan 1993

Export Of Rockmelons From The Ord River, John Bonnardeaux

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

The Ord River Irrigation Area and Carnarvon are the main production areas for cucurbits in northern Western Australia. Cucurbits are also grown in Derby, Broome and around Lagrange, south of Broome.

The area planted to rockmelons in the Ord River Irrigation Area has increased from 20 ha in 1980 to 425 ha in 1992.

Rockmelon production, the most important horticultural industry in the Ord River Irrigation Area, is worth about $9 million. It accounts for about 25 per cent of the Ord's dry season value of production


The Export Carrot Industry, Angie Galati, Allan Mckay Jan 1993

The Export Carrot Industry, Angie Galati, Allan Mckay

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

Carrots are the single most important horticultural export commodity from Western Australia.

In 1991-92, over 23,000 tonnes of carrots worth more than $12 million (fob) were exported. The State now exports about 70 per cent of its carrot production to Singapore, Malaysia, Hong Kong and the Middle East (see Table 1). These exports account for more than 90 per cent of Australian carrot exports. The State's carrot exports started in the mid 1970s. In 1977-78, only 2170 tofcarrots were exported, but exports have increased steadily since then (see Figure 1).


Development Of The Export Wine Industry, Tony Devitt Jan 1993

Development Of The Export Wine Industry, Tony Devitt

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

In 1936-37, Australia exported 18.6 million litres of wine, a level not achieved again for 50 years. World War II, the price, quality and style of Australian wine all contribuited to the demise of our wine export markets.

Australia's 'new' wine industry, which surfaced in the 1960s, has re-established our position as a significant exporter of high quality wines that are competitvely priced and percieved tobe 'pure and of integrity.

Western Australia is well placced to have a significant role in the expansion of Australia's wine exports.


A Tale Of Two Ladies : Pink Lady And Sundowner, John Cripps, Eleanor Melvin-Carter Jan 1993

A Tale Of Two Ladies : Pink Lady And Sundowner, John Cripps, Eleanor Melvin-Carter

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

It is five years since the first Western Australianbred Pink Lady and Sundowner apples were sold on the local market. In that time, these crisp, sweet flavoursome apples have become top-selling, premium fruit.

The story is no different overseas. Trial shipments to London, Taiwan and Singapore have indicated a big demand for the unique Pink Lady apple - far more than Western Australia can presently supply.

One million fruiting Pink Lady apple trees are needed to meet anticipated export sales. Today, there are only 100,000 trees in the ground, of which about half are bearing fruit.

New high quality apple ...


Production And Marketing Of Vegetables And Fruit, John Burt Jan 1993

Production And Marketing Of Vegetables And Fruit, John Burt

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

Vegetable and fruit production in Western Australia is a diverse, high value industry. Up to 75 different crops are grown from Kununurra in the north to Albany on the south coast.

Our horticultural industries were worth $238,127,000 in 1990-.91, which represented 18 per cent of all crops produced in Western Australia.

Markets for horticultural produce are volatile. For most lines, produce has been well supplied for the past four years, owing to an increasing area of production, higher yields, improved postharvest technology and reduced consumer demand in the recent recession.


Floriculture : A Blooming Business, Department Of Agriculture And Food, Western Australia Jan 1993

Floriculture : A Blooming Business, Department Of Agriculture And Food, Western Australia

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

Over the past 1O years, Western Australia's ornamental plant industry has experienced significant growth in value. The industry has expanded and adopted new technologies, but some enterprises have closed There have also been major changes reflecting the economic climate and conservation pressures.

The ornamental plant industry in this State is valued at more than $70 million annually. It encompasses three areas: nursery production, exotic cutflower production, and native cutllower production. The native cutflower industry is by far the largest growth sector.


Development Of Redglobe Table Grapes For Export, Ian Cameron Jan 1993

Development Of Redglobe Table Grapes For Export, Ian Cameron

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

Exports wereonce a major outlet for the Western Australian table grape industry.

Over the last 20 years however, exports have fallen from 500 to 00 tonnes per year, despite an increase in the area planted to table grapes and an increase on overseas demand for our produce.

By 1993 less than 3 per cent of the table grapes produced in the State were exported.

The introduction of Redglobe, a new table grape varietyy from California, is expected to increase the export of table grapes from Western Australia to 1000t by 1997, when the variety will represent 90 per cent of ...


Export Oaten Hay For The Japanese Market, Mick Poole, Rob Nussey Jan 1990

Export Oaten Hay For The Japanese Market, Mick Poole, Rob Nussey

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

Western Australian hay producers have a foothold in the lucrative Japanese market for forage products. The industry hopes to export about 30,000 tonnes in 1990-91.


Beefin : Maximizing Profits From Feeding Beef Cattle Out Of Season, R G. Grieve, David Barker, Jim May Jan 1989

Beefin : Maximizing Profits From Feeding Beef Cattle Out Of Season, R G. Grieve, David Barker, Jim May

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

BEEFIN is a computer model that formulates profit maximising diets for finishing beef cattle to a specified carcass weight and fat thickness. It predicts cattle growth rate, feed conversion ratio, final liveweight, number of days on feed and the amount of available feedstuffs required to finish cattle to specification, The diets fulfil the animal's energy, protien, mineral and roughage requirements.

BEEFIN also calculates a profit and loss budget for the enterprise, performs a sensitivity analysis on changes in the price for both cattle and feed and determines the changes in feed prices needed before the composition of the diet ...


Capretto : A New Meat Industry, R J. Suiter Jan 1989

Capretto : A New Meat Industry, R J. Suiter

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

Capretto is the term the Italians use for the meat from a goat upto 20 weeks old. For centuries goat meat has featured on tables from the Mediterranean to asia and the Pacific Islands.

Western Australian premium quality capretto has a dressed weight of between 6 and 1kg. Its pinkish flesh is tender and leaner than sheep meat, so it's ideal for the health conscious.

This article describes a market development programme undertaken by the Department of Agriculture's Goat Industry Development Unit (GIDU) and the Australian Cashmere Growers Association's (ACGA) Meat Marketing Committee to establish a premium ...