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Full-Text Articles in African American Studies

Style Watch: Blackface Edition, Rashida Aluko-Roberts Mar 2013

Style Watch: Blackface Edition, Rashida Aluko-Roberts

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The above quote is from a statement/apology offered by Sebastian Kim, a photographer, whose recent editorial, “African Queen,” which featured a 16-year-old white female made to appear black, was marred with controversy. According to the photographer, dousing a young white female in deep bronze, accessorizing her in elaborate head wraps and heavy jewels (symbols that are often associated with Africa), was in no way an attempt to depict what an “African queen” looks like. Rather, his spread was attempting to showcase “the beauty aesthetic of his shoot” by using a “tanned or golden skin” model. [excerpt]


That Awkward Moment When I Accidentally Internalized Racism, Rashida Aluko-Roberts Mar 2013

That Awkward Moment When I Accidentally Internalized Racism, Rashida Aluko-Roberts

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I recently attended a conference about the importance of Africana Studies (AFS) and it had a panel of visiting professors that consisted of mostly black men and women. I was beyond impressed by their achievements and found myself engaged and excited by their discussions. My admiration for these scholars only grew exponentially when I learned that one of the female professors was from Sierra Leone, just like me! [excerpt]


How I Met Your Mother & Other Spoiler Alerts, Emily M. Lindholm Feb 2013

How I Met Your Mother & Other Spoiler Alerts, Emily M. Lindholm

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Ted: She chews loudly. Why do you think we call her Chewbacca?

Marshall: Because she’s loyal, wears shiny belts, and I resemble a young Harrison Ford.

Shortly after this scene in How I Met Your Mother’s “Spoiler Alert” episode, Marshall experiences a sinking realization that his fiancée Lilly “chews loudly,” something Marshall never seemed to notice before. Cue the tacky yet–highly effective–“glass shattering” sound effects and 20 minutes of comedic exploitation of the gang’s annoying quirks, and you get five friends with a hilariously devastating new awareness of each other’s flaws, and one brilliant ...


Locks And Cash: Whose Black History? (Part 2), John M. Rudy Jul 2011

Locks And Cash: Whose Black History? (Part 2), John M. Rudy

Interpreting the Civil War: Connecting the Civil War to the American Public

A few weeks ago, the Hanover Evening Sun ran an article on the Lincoln Cemetery in Gettysburg and the locks which hang on its gates. This is by no means a new item of interest. The locks have girded the gates of the cemetery for three years. Still, the article (no longer on the Evening Sun's website but archived here in a PDF) raises a few interesting questions about the delicate balance between preservation and interpretation. [excerpt]


Locks And Cash: Whose Black History? (Part 1), John M. Rudy Jun 2011

Locks And Cash: Whose Black History? (Part 1), John M. Rudy

Interpreting the Civil War: Connecting the Civil War to the American Public

The African-American Civil War Memorial has been a favorite site of mine in DC (and not simply because it's just down the block from the District's best restaurant, Ben's Chili Bowl). It is a monument in the right setting. Instead of being on the mall with the rest of the other monuments, to be easily overlooked like the DC World War I memorial or similar sidelights to the big three of Lincoln, Washington and Vietnam, the African American Civil War Memorial is in a community that can be moved by it. [excerpt]