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Full-Text Articles in African American Studies

"Listen To The Wild Discord": Jazz In The Chicago Defender And The Louisiana Weekly, 1925-1929, Sarah A. Waits May 2013

"Listen To The Wild Discord": Jazz In The Chicago Defender And The Louisiana Weekly, 1925-1929, Sarah A. Waits

University of New Orleans Theses and Dissertations

This essay will use the views of two African American newspaper columnists, E. Belfield Spriggins of the Louisiana Weekly and Dave Peyton of the Chicago Defender, to argue that though New Orleans and Chicago both occupied a primary place in the history of jazz, in many ways jazz was initially met with ambivalence and suspicion. The struggle between the desire to highlight black achievement in music and the effort to adhere to tenets of middle class respectability play out in their columns. Despite historiographical writings to the contrary, these issues of the influence of jazz music on society were not ...


"Spectacular Opacities": The Hyers Sisters' Performances Of Respectability And Resistance, Jocelyn Buckner Jan 2012

"Spectacular Opacities": The Hyers Sisters' Performances Of Respectability And Resistance, Jocelyn Buckner

Theatre Faculty Articles and Research

This essay analyzes the Hyers Sisters, a Reconstruction-era African American sister act, and their radical efforts to transcend social limits of gender, class, and race in their early concert careers and three major productions, Out of Bondage and Peculiar Sam, or The Underground Railroad, two slavery-to-freedom epics, and Urlina, the African Princess, the first known African American play set in Africa. At a time when serious, realistic roles and romantic plotlines featuring black actors were nearly nonexistent due to the country’s appetite for stereotypical caricatures, the Hyers Sisters used gender passing to perform opposite one another as heterosexual lovers ...


Reed, Ashlee Catara, B. 1986 (Fa 548), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Jan 2011

Reed, Ashlee Catara, B. 1986 (Fa 548), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

FA Finding Aids

Finding aid and full-text papers (click on "Additional Files" below) for Folklife Archives Project 548. Contains three papers: “Permanent Wave Machine,” “The Hot Comb” about African American hairstyling, and “The Telephone Switchboard,” about an early switchboard on display in Barren County, Kentucky. Includes color illustrations. This project was a requirement for a folk studies class at Western Kentucky University.


Hines, Thomas Collier, Jr. (Fa 7), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Sep 2010

Hines, Thomas Collier, Jr. (Fa 7), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

FA Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Folklife Archives Project 7. Interviews conducted by Thomas Hines. Includes intervewis with Sarah Alice (Marcum) Roemer. The interviews include information about Alice Roemer's life, inlcuding her childhood, education, work and family experiences, with special emphasis on Thanksgiving customs.


Street-Ball: The Myth Of The Ghetto Basketball Star, Vincent F. Mcsweeney May 2008

Street-Ball: The Myth Of The Ghetto Basketball Star, Vincent F. Mcsweeney

Honors Scholar Theses

In recent decades, countless scholars have examined the developing trend of African American dominance in United States’ professional sports. Many have hypothesized that this over-representation is caused by the presumed reliance on sports as an avenue out of poverty for the African American youths. This trend, it is believed, has a highly detrimental effect the African American community. In actuality, this argument is flawed because it works under the stereotypical assumption that the overwhelming majority of African Americans come from abject poverty. To dispel this fallacy, the author has analyzed the upbringings of each All-National Basketball League First Team player ...


Interview With Clem Haskins (Fa 202), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Jan 2006

Interview With Clem Haskins (Fa 202), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

FA Oral Histories

Transcription of an interview with Clem Smith Haskins conducted by Lynne Ferguson for an oral history project titled "Campbellsville-Taylor County Oral History Project." Haskins discusses his family, education, farming, and information about growing up in Taylor County, Kentucky.


The Rhetorical Effectiveness Of Black Like Me, Hugh Rank Sep 1968

The Rhetorical Effectiveness Of Black Like Me, Hugh Rank

English Faculty Publications

In 1959, John Howard Griffin, a white Southern novelist, disguised himself as a Negro and traveled through the South to experience "what it is like to be a Negro in a land where we keep the Negro down." The brief narrative account of this experience is recorded in Black Like Me, a book which wom the Saturday Review's Anisfield-Wolf award in 1962 for its contribution toward race relations. In brief, why is Black Like Me rhetorically effective?