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Full-Text Articles in African American Studies

"We Are The Revolutionaries": Visibility, Protest, And Racial Formation In 1970s Prison Radicalism, Dan Berger Dec 2010

"We Are The Revolutionaries": Visibility, Protest, And Racial Formation In 1970s Prison Radicalism, Dan Berger

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

This dissertation analyzes black and Puerto Rican prison protest in the 1970s. I argue that prisoners elucidated a nationalist philosophy of racial formation that saw racism as a site of confinement but racial identity as a vehicle for emancipation. Trying to force the country to see its sites of punishment as discriminatory locations of repression, prisoners used spectacular confrontation to dramatize their conditions of confinement as epitomizing American inequality. I investigate this radicalism as an effort to secure visibility, understood here as a metric of collective consciousness. In documenting the ways prisoners were symbols and spokespeople of 1970s racial protest ...


Art Fronts: Visual Culture And Race Politics In The Mid-Twentieth-Century United States, Erin P. Cohn May 2010

Art Fronts: Visual Culture And Race Politics In The Mid-Twentieth-Century United States, Erin P. Cohn

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

ART FRONTS: VISUAL CULTURE AND RACE POLITICS IN THE MID-TWENTIETH-CENTURY UNITED STATES Erin Park Cohn Supervisor: Kathy Peiss Art Fronts argues that visual culture played a central and understudied role in the African American freedom struggle in the middle part of the twentieth century. In particular, it traces the political lives and cultural productions of a generation of visual artists, both black and white, who seized on the Depression-era ethos of art as a weapon to forge a particular form of visual activism that agitated for social, political, and economic equality for African Americans. Participating in the proliferation of visual ...