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Full-Text Articles in African American Studies

Arming The Slaves: From Classical Times To The Modern Age – Edited By Christopher Leslie Brown And Philip D. Morgan, Manisha Sinha Sep 2008

Arming The Slaves: From Classical Times To The Modern Age – Edited By Christopher Leslie Brown And Philip D. Morgan, Manisha Sinha

Manisha Sinha

No abstract provided.


Grounded History: A Keynote Address To The 14th Annual Massachusetts Statewide Undergraduate Research Conference, Amilcar Shabazz May 2008

Grounded History: A Keynote Address To The 14th Annual Massachusetts Statewide Undergraduate Research Conference, Amilcar Shabazz

Amilcar Shabazz

No abstract provided.


Experts Call For Rethinking Aids Money, Richard Wamai Jan 2008

Experts Call For Rethinking Aids Money, Richard Wamai

Richard G. Wamai

No abstract provided.


Black Audiences, Blaxploitation And Kung Fu Films, And Challenges To White Celluloid Masculinity, Sundiata K. Cha-Jua Jan 2008

Black Audiences, Blaxploitation And Kung Fu Films, And Challenges To White Celluloid Masculinity, Sundiata K. Cha-Jua

Sundiata K Cha-Jua

The roots of African Americans’ attraction to kung fu films are deeply embed- ded in their sociohistorical experiences. Simply put, it is a product of blacks’ political and cultural resistance to racial oppression. Although “repression breeds resistance,” opposing oppression is never simple; it is always varied and complex. Resistance is as likely to include cross-cutting strategies and discourses as mutually reinforcing ones. Two different but overlapping ideo- logical discourses, Pan-Africanism and Black Internationalism, help explain African Americans’ fascination with kung fu films. Pan-Africanists view the diverse dispersed peoples of African descent as one family. And perhaps, more importantly, they locate ...


Mamie Bradley's Unbearable Burden: Sexual And Aesthetic Politics In Bebe Moore Campbell's Your Blues Ain't Like Mine, Koritha Mitchell Jan 2008

Mamie Bradley's Unbearable Burden: Sexual And Aesthetic Politics In Bebe Moore Campbell's Your Blues Ain't Like Mine, Koritha Mitchell

Koritha Mitchell

This essay offers a reading of Bebe Moore Campbell's 1992 novel Your Blues Ain't Like Mine, which re-imagines the 1955 murder of Emmett Till and its aftermath. I argue that the novel is a tribute to Till and his mother, Mamie Bradley, but that it also illustrates the agony of being the survivor whose pain occasions such tributes. Through Delotha Todd, the character loosely based on Bradley, Campbell imagines the mother's burden to have been especially unbearable because so many strangers, including Campbell herself, claimed to share it. In the process of acknowledging the many facets Delotha ...


“Jean Jacques Dessalines”, Marc Prou Dec 2007

“Jean Jacques Dessalines”, Marc Prou

Marc E. Prou

Biography of Jean-Jacques Dessalines


“Decolonization”, Marc Prou Dec 2007

“Decolonization”, Marc Prou

Marc E. Prou

No abstract provided.


Crooning On The Fault Lines: Theorizing Jazz And Pop Vocal Singing Discourse In The Rock Era, 1955-1978, Vincent L. Stephens Dec 2007

Crooning On The Fault Lines: Theorizing Jazz And Pop Vocal Singing Discourse In The Rock Era, 1955-1978, Vincent L. Stephens

Vincent L Stephens

The critical boundaries drawn between pop crooning and jazz singing are less discrete than commonly perceived by critics and historians. Commercial choices rather than clear-cut aesthetic differences have influenced classifications of non-improvisers like Tony Bennett and Peggy Lee as “jazz” singers, a category presumed to represent the ultimate in vocal interpretation. Comparatively, singers like Johnny Mathis and Barbra Streisand are aesthetically similar to prerock crooners (PRCs) but typically understood as pop singers and thus on a lower interpretive tier. This article interrogates the binary by examining the overlaps and divergences between PRCs whose recording careers (mostly) began during the big ...