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Full-Text Articles in African American Studies

Olaudah Equiano: Facts About His People And Place Of Birth, Friday Onyeoziri Sep 2008

Olaudah Equiano: Facts About His People And Place Of Birth, Friday Onyeoziri

Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge

Olaudah Equiano, an African-American born in 1745 in Essaka, a town in modern eastern Nigeria, is reputed as the first African-born former slave to write his autobiography without the help or direction of white writers of his time like his predecessors. His work is recognized "not only as one of the first works written in English by a former slave, but perhaps more important as the paradigm of the slave narrative, a new literary genre" (Olaudah). Equiano's Narratives lately became the focus of some controversies by his critics who question the authenticity of his claims, which they see as ...


After Abolition: Britain And The Slave Trade Since 1807, Marika Sherwood, Christian Hogsbjerg Mar 2008

After Abolition: Britain And The Slave Trade Since 1807, Marika Sherwood, Christian Hogsbjerg

African Diaspora Archaeology Newsletter

No abstract provided.


Adams County History 2008 Jan 2008

Adams County History 2008

Adams County History

No abstract provided.


Black Labor At Pine Grove & Caledonia Furnaces, 1789-1860, Troy D. Harman Jan 2008

Black Labor At Pine Grove & Caledonia Furnaces, 1789-1860, Troy D. Harman

Adams County History

Black labor operating under various degrees of freedom found a suitable working environment, if not a safe haven, in several iron forges of South Central Pennsylvania, from the late 1790s through the 1850s. Primary accounts indicate that two in particular, Pine Grove Furnace of Cumberland County, and Caledonia Furnace of Franklin County, harbored runaway slaves to augment their work force. Pine Grove records, dating from 1789 – 1801, specify names of “negro” employees, verifying that black labor coexisted with white, but day books, journals, and ledgers do not denote status.1 Whether they were free men, or slaves rented out by ...