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2006

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Articles 1 - 30 of 93

Full-Text Articles in African American Studies

David, Patricia, African & African American Studies Department. Patricia David Dec 2006

David, Patricia, African & African American Studies Department. Patricia David

Oral Histories

Interviewers: Mark Naison and Natasha Lightfoot

Interviewee: Patricia David

Summarized by Leigh Waterbury

Patricia David was born inBirmingham,Englandin 1959. Her parents were both born inDominicain the French West Indies and immigrated toEngland. After Patricia was born her father came alone to theUnited Statesand lived inQueens. He then became a superintendent of a building in theSouth Bronxand then Patricia and her siblings moved along with their mother into the ground floor apartment onTremont Avenue. Her mother basically took over superintendent duties so that her father could work to provide extra income. Many of the other apartments in the building were ...


Lake, Olivia, Lake, Olivia. Bronx African American History Project Dec 2006

Lake, Olivia, Lake, Olivia. Bronx African American History Project

Oral Histories

INTERVIEWER: Natasha Lightfoot, Mali Olatunji

INTERVIEWEE: Olivia Lake

SUMMARY BY: Patrick O’Donnell

Olivia Lake (aka “Mama Lake”) was born in Antigua in 1905. Her parents were cotton and cane farmers. She remembers little of her upbringing in Antigua, but she moved to Trinidad to live with her father when she was 18 years old, after the death of her grandmother. She worked as a servant in a household there and was married there. In 1931, she moved to Santo Domingo in the Dominican Republic in order to join her mother. In the DR, Lake worked as a clothes washer ...


Capers, Valerie Interview 1, Capers, Valerie. Bronx African American History Project Dec 2006

Capers, Valerie Interview 1, Capers, Valerie. Bronx African American History Project

Oral Histories

Interviewee: Valerie Capers

Interviewer: Dr. Mark Naison, Maxine Gordon, Dawn Russell

Date of Interview: December 14, 2006

Summarized by Alice Stryker

Valerie’s parents grew up in Harlem. Her maternal great grandmother came to Harlem from Virginia. After the couple was married they moved to the Bronx. She thinks that many newlyweds at the time would move from Harlem to the Bronx. When she was born, the family was living on 168th street between Union and Prospect Avenue. While she was living there, she lost her sight. When she was young she lost her vision. She had pink eye ...


On The Transportation Of Material Goods By Enslaved Africans During The Middle Passage: Preliminary Findings From Documentary Sources, Jerome S. Handler Dec 2006

On The Transportation Of Material Goods By Enslaved Africans During The Middle Passage: Preliminary Findings From Documentary Sources, Jerome S. Handler

African Diaspora Archaeology Newsletter

No abstract provided.


Rooks, Valerie, Rooks, Valerie Interview: Bronx African American History Project Nov 2006

Rooks, Valerie, Rooks, Valerie Interview: Bronx African American History Project

Oral Histories

Valerie Rooks, born on July 29, 1954, grew up in the Sedgwick Housing Projects of the Bronx. Her parents, Helen Eugenia Hagen and Robert Lee Dillard, raised in Connecticut and Georgia respectively, moved into the project in 1952. Rooks recalls spending summers with her father’s family in Savannah Georgia in her preteen years. The Dillards worked several jobs to support their five children. In addition to working for the post office, her father took on odd jobs including cab driving and mechanic work. Her mother too held various part-time positions such as working for the board of elections, the ...


Melendez, Benjamin, Melendez, Benjamin. Interview: Bronx African American History Project Nov 2006

Melendez, Benjamin, Melendez, Benjamin. Interview: Bronx African American History Project

Oral Histories

In this moving interview with the Bronx African American History Project, Benjamin Melendez, speaks with Dr. Mark Naison about his life, which has taken him from gang member to community organizer who now tries to educate young men and women about the dangers of the lifestyle that he once led.

Born in 1952 on the island of Puerto Rico, Melendez moved to New York when he was just eight months old, jumping from place to place in New York City before settling in the Bronx in 1964. Living on Stebbins Ave between 163rd and 165th streets in Morrisania ...


Lawrence, Rosalind, Lawrence, Rosalind. Bronx African American History Project Oct 2006

Lawrence, Rosalind, Lawrence, Rosalind. Bronx African American History Project

Oral Histories

Interviewee: Rosalind Lawrence

Interviewer: Dr. Brian Purnell

Summarized by Alice Stryker

Rosalind was born on November 26, 1956 in the Bronx. She grew up in the Sedgwick Houses. Her mother was born in Connecticut and her father was born in Georgia. Her parents moved from Prospect Avenue to the Sedgwick houses and saw it as moving up. The Sedgwick houses were originally for Veterans, and because her father was in the Korean War, they were able to move into the Sedgwick housing projects. They had a roomy 2 bed room apartment. Most of African Americans living in her building were ...


Writings: Transcript - A Bold New Revolution: Jacksonville Before Consolidation, Edna Louise Saffy, James B. Crooks, David Milam, Jay Mooney, Raymond Neal, Louis H. Ritter, Carolyn L. Williams, Alton Yates Oct 2006

Writings: Transcript - A Bold New Revolution: Jacksonville Before Consolidation, Edna Louise Saffy, James B. Crooks, David Milam, Jay Mooney, Raymond Neal, Louis H. Ritter, Carolyn L. Williams, Alton Yates

Saffy Collection - All Textual Materials

Speeches: A transcription of A Bold New Revolution: Jacksonville Before Consolidation - A Panel Discussion Commemorating 38 Years of Consolidated Government October 21, 2006.


Swerdlow, Marian, Swerdlow, Marian. Interview: Bronx African American History Project Oct 2006

Swerdlow, Marian, Swerdlow, Marian. Interview: Bronx African American History Project

Oral Histories

Marian Swerdlow was born on November 8th, 1949. Her mother was born in the Bronx, and her father’s family emigrated from Russia and lived on the Lower East Side. After marrying, they moved to a small house in Morrisania, at 3660 Park Avenue. Marian’s parents were active members of the communist party, although Marian herself did not find this out until she became involved in Vietnam protests and her parents informed her of their political inclinations.

Marian and her family lived as one of the only white families in their area, although Marian did not grow up ...


Byron, Cyril, African & African American Studies Department. Cyril Byron Oct 2006

Byron, Cyril, African & African American Studies Department. Cyril Byron

Oral Histories

Dr. Cyril O. Byron was born atLincolnHospitalin theBronxonApril 15, 1920. His parents moved fromJamaicatoNew Yorkin the early 1900s. His father, who had been chief chef on Marcus Garvey’s ship, cooked for severalNew York Cityrestaurants and hotels, and founded Byron Caterers, one of theBronx’s largest black owned catering services. His mother did housework for prominentNew York Cityfamilies. Both were politically active, and his mother was a staunch follower of Marcus Garvey. His father was also superintendent for various buildings in which the family resided in theBronx, and Byron recalls doing much custodial work in the buildings with his brother ...


Who Was Cock Robin? A New Reading Of Erna Brodber's Jane And Louisa Will Soon Come Home, Daryl Cumber Dance Sep 2006

Who Was Cock Robin? A New Reading Of Erna Brodber's Jane And Louisa Will Soon Come Home, Daryl Cumber Dance

English Faculty Publications

Much has been written about the quest of Brodber's protagonist Nellie for identity, for wholeness, for balance, for sanity, for finding her way back home into the community. Nellie's efforts to find herself and to integrate into the community will be easier, Brodber declared in a speech in 1988, "when Jane and Louisa come home, i.e., when the women find themselves" (Notes). Brodber also observed in that same speech, "'coming' rather than 'being' is the appropriate action word with which to address the issue of integration into the community," a fact suggested by the game that gives ...


Shedding Light Upon The Shadows: An Examination Of The Use Of Voice As Resistance And Reclamation Of The Black Woman From Enslavement To Freedom., Courtney Erin Brooks Aug 2006

Shedding Light Upon The Shadows: An Examination Of The Use Of Voice As Resistance And Reclamation Of The Black Woman From Enslavement To Freedom., Courtney Erin Brooks

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

My research examines the enslaved black woman's reclamation of self through the use of voice and resistance from enslavement into freedom. I argue that the enslaved black woman's voice was one that grew stronger and louder, in an effort to have her story heard, through her attempts of reclamation of self and transition from slave to a free woman. I begin with an introduction to the purpose of my research. Chapter one describes my approach to my research. Chapter two describes the conditions of slavery for black women. Chapter three describes enslaved black women's mechanisms of resistance ...


Ford, Bernadette, Ford, Bernadette. Bronx African American History Project Jul 2006

Ford, Bernadette, Ford, Bernadette. Bronx African American History Project

Oral Histories

Inerviewee: Bernadette Jackson Ford

Interviewers: Dr. Mark Naison and Natasha Lightfoot

Date of interview July 28, 1006

Summarized by Alice Stryker

Bernadette begins the interview by talking about her parents coming to New York. Both grew up in Birmingham, Alabama and met when they were younger. Neither one of them said that they felt the sting of segregation, and were in New York when most of the civil rights activities were occurring in Birmingham. When they moved to New York, they moved to Harlem with her father’s cousins.

She is the oldest of three and was born in 1958 ...


Chappell, Marguerite, Chappell, Marguerite. Bronx African American History Project Jul 2006

Chappell, Marguerite, Chappell, Marguerite. Bronx African American History Project

Oral Histories

Marguerite Chappell grew up in the Morrisania area of the Bronx. Her mother was from Atlanta Georgia, and her father was from South Carolina. Her parents moved to New York City for more work, like most other people, she says. They first moved to Brooklyn, and when the Forest Houses were completed, they moved to the Bronx. Her mother worked as an educator at P.S. 140 in the Bronx and she was also a paraprofessional. She describes her mother as one of a group of people who helped reshape the face of her neighborhood, and Marguerite saw her as ...


Schlitten, Don, African & African American Studies Department. Don Schlitten Jul 2006

Schlitten, Don, African & African American Studies Department. Don Schlitten

Oral Histories

No abstract provided.


"A Contingent Somebody": Hannibal Hamlin's Claim For A First Reading Of The Emancipation Proclamation, Allen C. Guelzo Jul 2006

"A Contingent Somebody": Hannibal Hamlin's Claim For A First Reading Of The Emancipation Proclamation, Allen C. Guelzo

Civil War Era Studies Faculty Publications

On more than one occasion, the historical record has implied that Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation was a hastily composed document: an impulsive reaction to military events surrounding the Civil War. In fact, it was an evolving idea that began to take shape long before Lincoln had read the initial draft of the Proclamation to his cabinet on July 22, 1862. A closer look at the role of Vice-President Hannibal Hamlin of Maine during the most divisive presidency in American history sheds new light on the consideration and deliberation that went into drafting a document that, on January 1, 1863 ...


Abroad At Home: Xenomania And Voluntary Exile In The Middle Passage, Salt, And Tide Running, Kevin Frank Jul 2006

Abroad At Home: Xenomania And Voluntary Exile In The Middle Passage, Salt, And Tide Running, Kevin Frank

Publications and Research

This essay re-examines the causes and consequences of Caribbean alienation, with implications for understanding alienation in other postcolonial societies. The author argues that while externalization does follow colonial incursions or international travel by the colonized, exile and alienation also result from emotional or psychological migrations within the mind, a consequence of neocolonial mechanisms tied to globalization.


White, Nat And Bernard Drayton, African & African American Studies Department. Nat White And Bernard Drayton Jun 2006

White, Nat And Bernard Drayton, African & African American Studies Department. Nat White And Bernard Drayton

Oral Histories

Nat White and Bernard Drayton were the men responsible for producing a series of jazz concerts at the Blue Morocco in the 1960’s. The Blue Morocco was located on Boston Road and 167th, but today no longer exists. The two men worked for Del Shields who was a DJ for WLIB FM, playing all jazz for 12 hours after midnight. Del knew Sylvia and Joe Robinson who owned the Blue Morocco. They began recording these jazz concerts on Monday nights for WLIB FM radio around 1964 and continued until 1967. While these jazz concerts were successful, it was ...


Bataan, Joe, Bataan, Joe. Bronx African American History Project Jun 2006

Bataan, Joe, Bataan, Joe. Bronx African American History Project

Oral Histories

173/4(?)th Interview

Interviewee: Joe Bataan

Interviewer: Mark Naison, Maxine Gordon

Interview took place June 12, 2006

Summarized by Concetta Gleason 2-1-07

Bataan Nitalano’s mother is African-American and his father is Philippine. His father joined the navy and did a lot of seasonal work as a short-order cook. Bataan would see his father only six months of the year. His racially mixed family was a rarity in Spanish Harlem where he grew up. His father was Catholic and his mother encouraged his attending Church. Although the neighborhood was mostly Spanish, there was a lot of Blacks, Chinese and ...


Milano And Singleton, African & African American Studies Department. Milano And Singleton Jun 2006

Milano And Singleton, African & African American Studies Department. Milano And Singleton

Oral Histories

Ms. Milano and Ms. Singleton are the Principal and Vice Principal of P.S. 153 in the Co-op City section of the Bronx. Ms. Milano grandparents were born inItaly, but her parents were raised inAmerica. Ms. Milano’s father was born and raised on115th Streetand Hone and her mother was born and raised onBathgate Avenueand181st Street. Milano’s parents married and moved toGlover Street, nearWestchester AvenueandHavemeyer Avenue. After Ms. Milano was born, the family moved to thePelham Parkwaysection of theBronx. Ms. Singleton parents originate fromSouth Carolina. Her mother moved toCentral Islip,Long Islandand her father was living inHarlem. After Ms ...


Martinez, Tony, Martinez, Tony. Bronx African American History Project May 2006

Martinez, Tony, Martinez, Tony. Bronx African American History Project

Oral Histories

Tony and his family immigrated to the US as refugees from Cuba in 1966. When the family moved to the Bronx, they were living in an apartment in a cardboard factory. His father was also a worker at a cardboard factory in Long Island City. Unfortunately, when he immigrated, he spoke no English and was consequently put into the special education class at PS 26. One teacher that particularly inspired him was Mr. Krinler. He was able to teach Tony and because of Mr. Krinler’s efforts, Tony was moved into the top class of his grade. When he was ...


Hines, Eric-- Lance Johnson And David Wheeler, Hines, Eric-- Lane Johnson And David Wheeler. Bronx African American History Project May 2006

Hines, Eric-- Lance Johnson And David Wheeler, Hines, Eric-- Lane Johnson And David Wheeler. Bronx African American History Project

Oral Histories

Interviewers: Brian Purnell, Mark Naison, Princess Okieme, Dolores Munoz

Interviewees: Eric Hines, Lance Johnson, Joshua Wheeler

Summarized by Leigh Waterbury

Eric “DJ Cool Clyde” Hines and Lance “DJ Lightnin’ Lance” Johnson were both born and raised in theBronxin the 1960’s. Eric Hines was born July 31, 1966 and grew up in the Soundview section of theBronx, in the Skylar House. Lance Johnson was born August 6, 1962 and was raised mostly in the Lafayette-Boynton Avenue Houses betweenStory AvenueandBoynton Avenue. Both men briefly discussed their childhoods and the negative environments of drugs and gangs that attracted many children their age ...


Is The Civil Rights Movement Really Dead: The Social Philosophy Of Congressman John Lewis, Kevin Hoover May 2006

Is The Civil Rights Movement Really Dead: The Social Philosophy Of Congressman John Lewis, Kevin Hoover

African & African American Studies Senior Theses

The path from rural Pike County, Alabama to the floor of the nation's Capitol was one litters with hatred, bigotry, and injustice for John Lewis; however, it was this true American hero who helped pave-over this scarred road with tolerance, truth, and compassion in the hopes of building "The Beloved Community." Born the son of two sharecroppers 1940, John Lewis entered a world which subjected him to the harshest times of segregation and souther racism. Over the next sixty-six years of his life, Lewis would dedicate himself to not just the cause of black Americans, but moreover, to the ...


Conzo, Joe Jr., Bronx African American History Project May 2006

Conzo, Joe Jr., Bronx African American History Project

Oral Histories

Interviewee: Joe Conzo, Jr.

Interviewer: Mark Naison, Maxine Gordon, Marvin Cabrerra

Interview on May 9, 2006

Summarized by Alice Stryker

Joe Conzo is the first hip-hop photographer and was born February 6, 1963. His grandmother Evelina Antonetty was a community activist. She moved from Puerto Rico to the Bronx and immediately got involved with politics in the 1950’s. She started the United Bronx Parents. His entire family, starting with his grandmother, stayed in the Motthaven area of the Bronx and all attended P.S 25. He grew up in the St. Mary’s Projects on 149th street. Music ...


"Don't Believe The Hype": The Construction And Export Of African American Images In Hip-Hop Culture., John Ike Sewell Jr. May 2006

"Don't Believe The Hype": The Construction And Export Of African American Images In Hip-Hop Culture., John Ike Sewell Jr.

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

This study examines recurring motifs and personas in hip-hop.

Interviews with influential hip-hop scholars, writers and music industry personnel were conducted and analyzed using qualitative methods. Interview subjects were selected based on their insider knowledge as music critics, hip-hop scholars, ethnomusicologists, publicists, and music industry positions.

The vast majority of constructed imagery in hip-hop is based on a single persona, the gangsta. This qualitative analysis reveals why gangsta personas and motifs have become the de facto imagery of hip-hop. Gangsta imagery is repeatedly presented because it sells, it is the most readily-available role, and because of music industry pressures.

This ...


Ua12/2/1 College Heights Herald, Vol. 81, No. 47, Wku Student Affairs May 2006

Ua12/2/1 College Heights Herald, Vol. 81, No. 47, Wku Student Affairs

WKU Archives Records

WKU campus newspaper reporting campus, athletic and Bowling Green, Kentucky news. Articles in this issue:

  • Brandenburg, Katie. Commuters Join Global Fight - Uganda
  • Brandenburg, Katie. Student Government Association Budget has $30K Remaining
  • Coulter, Amber. Sigma Alpha Epsilons Break Ground on New House
  • Harrell, Bobby. Searching for Truth, Team Finds Trophies – WKU Forensics Team
  • McNamara, Andrew. Campus Updates, Repairs Picked Based on Priority
  • Wooden, Kevin. Herald Not Responsible for Lack of Student Government Association Enthusiasm on Campus
  • Kerby, Molly. Western Should Not be Deterred by Arson Attacking Cherry
  • BSAs Should be Thanked – Building Service Attendants, Cherry Hall
  • Coulter, Amber. Science Suffers from ...


Theresa, Loretta, Theresa, Loretta Interview: Bronx African American History Project May 2006

Theresa, Loretta, Theresa, Loretta Interview: Bronx African American History Project

Oral Histories

Her mother and father were from St. Croix, Virgin Islands and St. John’s, Antigua respectively and they met at St. Mark the Evangelist School. They both graduated from St. Mark’s Elementary School, and they married when they were about 18-19 years old. The family lived initially in Harlem but when her parents separated, she moved with her mother to the Bronx, which she felt was “less crowded … just so bright and so beautiful.” She joined the Franciscan Handmaids of Mary, after some sisters from the Oblate Sisters of Providence from Maryland visited the Blessed Sacrament Sisters, and a ...


Bricks In Our Bags: Examining Hypertension In African-American Women Through An African-Centered Perspective, Letitia Presley-Cantrell May 2006

Bricks In Our Bags: Examining Hypertension In African-American Women Through An African-Centered Perspective, Letitia Presley-Cantrell

ETD Collection for AUC Robert W. Woodruff Library

This study examines the association between women with characteristics of Africana Womanism and hypertension (high blood pressure).

An analysis was performed using data from the National Survey of Black Americans to determine the association between women with characteristics of Africana Womanism and hypertension. Data analysis consisted of univariate, bivariate, and multivariate analyses. An analysis of the data revealed that characteristics of Africana Womanism serve as a protective factor for hypertension in African-American women. The association between women with characteristics of Africana Womanism and hypertension when adjusting for age indicates that women with characteristics of Africana Womanism were 0.56 times ...


The Unknown Struggle : A Comparative Analysis Of Women In The Black Power Movement., Elizabeth Michele Jones May 2006

The Unknown Struggle : A Comparative Analysis Of Women In The Black Power Movement., Elizabeth Michele Jones

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

This thesis comparatively analyzes the experiences and roles of women in the United States and Caribbean Black Power Movements. Using the Black Panther Party and Trinidadian National Joint Action Committee as case studies, the researcher isolates similarities and differences among women in these two regions of the African Diaspora. Black Feminist and Caribbean Feminist theoretical perspectives aide in understanding how the interlocking social forces of race, class, and gender impacted women participating in the Black Nationalist movement of the late 1960's and early 1970's.


Lightfoot, Joceyln, Lightfoot, Joceyn. Bronx African American History Project Apr 2006

Lightfoot, Joceyln, Lightfoot, Joceyn. Bronx African American History Project

Oral Histories

Interviewee: Jocelyn Lightfoot

Interviewer: Mark Naison and Natasha Lightfoot

Summarized by Alice Stryker

Jocelyn Lightfoot was an immigrant from Antigua and was born on October 6, 1946. She was number 4 out of 7 and her father was a mechanic and her mother a housewife. She had a very strict upbringing and did not go to many parties. For social activity, her family often went to picnics. She went to Christ theKingHigh School, which was a Catholic school although her family was Anglican. She first visited theUSin 1968. She was able to visit theUSfrequently because of her job with an ...