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Full-Text Articles in African American Studies

Rondo Days, Kellian Clink Sep 2020

Rondo Days, Kellian Clink

Library Services Faculty and Staff Publications

The Rondo Days Festival, inaugurated in 1983, is a reunion of the Black community of the Twin Cities. It memorializes and mourns a neighborhood gone, a neighborhood where residents “learned to fill the gaps in American history (Fairbanks 1999, 141), learned about the contributions and tribulations of their people. The celebration remembers when the creation of I-94 meant the destruction of a vibrant neighborhood, moving hundreds of families from a community of truly gracious homes to “substandard housing with bad wiring” (Baker 1994). Rondo Days celebrates a sense of community sustained in defiance of institutional racism and urban planning run ...


Law School News: Remembering John Lewis 07-18-2020, Michael M. Bowden Jul 2020

Law School News: Remembering John Lewis 07-18-2020, Michael M. Bowden

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Colonized Loyalty: Asian American Anti-Blackness And Complicity, Reshmi Dutt-Ballerstadt Jun 2020

Colonized Loyalty: Asian American Anti-Blackness And Complicity, Reshmi Dutt-Ballerstadt

Faculty Publications

In this essay, Reshmi Dutt-Ballerstad argues that solidarity between and within communities of color remains our only chance to fight against the brutal and insidious forces of racism, white supremacy and racial capitalism.


“A Matter Of Personal Pride”: How African American Football All-Stars Exposed Bigotry In New Orleans, Including Didactic Considerations And Lesson Plans, Andreas Hofbauer Apr 2020

“A Matter Of Personal Pride”: How African American Football All-Stars Exposed Bigotry In New Orleans, Including Didactic Considerations And Lesson Plans, Andreas Hofbauer

Center Austria Research

Throughout African American history, sport has played a major role in promoting integration and full participation in American society beyond the playing fields or courts. In the 1960s, after the first wave of African American athletes entering the white-dominated collegiate and professional sports leagues, active forms of protest against racial inequality in the US became gradually more relevant. Though in relatively small numbers, some African American athletes across various sports have used their privileged situation to voice the need for a revision of the system which has failed to represent and serve their people throughout American history.

This paper focuses ...


Albert Harold Banks, Jarred John Cantu Apr 2020

Albert Harold Banks, Jarred John Cantu

Methods of Historical Research: Spring 2020

One thing is certain for the history of San Antonio; the African American community has had a little spotlight shined on them throughout. Today San Antonio has many different cultures throughout where ideas are all mixed together in 460 plus square miles of land according to the 2010 census. For obvious reasons, San Antonio didn’t become this way overnight. Throughout its history we have seen its fair share of many races coming over and setting up new homes here; more so in the African American community. Until recently we have only begun to understand what this community has brought ...


San Antonio's Redlining And Segregation, Arnulfo Tovar Apr 2020

San Antonio's Redlining And Segregation, Arnulfo Tovar

Methods of Historical Research: Spring 2020

Segregation were evidently shown during the years of 1903-1925 within San Antonio and has a long and complex history of segregation and redlining. What my research will be consisting of is how the work of B.G. Irish and H.E. Dickinson from 1903-1925, as well as the work of Home Owners Loan Corporation (HOLC) in the 1930’s contributed to the rise and expansion of redlining and segregation in San Antonio. Irish and Dickinson were two successful real estate developers, and they included racial covenants in their deeds, covenants that states that no African Americans or Mexicans could own ...


Research On The Demographic Changes Around San Antonio's St. Paul Square From 1880 To 1920, Christopher D. Oliver Apr 2020

Research On The Demographic Changes Around San Antonio's St. Paul Square From 1880 To 1920, Christopher D. Oliver

Methods of Historical Research: Spring 2020

We often hear of the massive boom in population experienced by various Northern cities during the Great Migration (1916-1960), where over 6 million African Americans would migrate across the country in search for better opportunities. What we do not often hear is how such migration affected the larger Southern cities. Such a seemingly important and relevant question deserves to be covered extensively. San Antonio, while a large city (and once the largest in Texas), has been left unexplored on this question, while other Texas cities like Houston are receiving some coverage on this topic. I want to begin answering this ...


The Unheard Stories Of Former San Antonio Slaves, David R. Harris Apr 2020

The Unheard Stories Of Former San Antonio Slaves, David R. Harris

Methods of Historical Research: Spring 2020

While the end of slavery in America was a huge step to provide equality to all, the livelihood of former slaves after the Civil War took many different paths, some of those paths ended up in San Antonio, Texas.


Founding Of Naacp In San Antonio 1918: A Call To Activism, Eric D. Nolden Apr 2020

Founding Of Naacp In San Antonio 1918: A Call To Activism, Eric D. Nolden

Methods of Historical Research: Spring 2020

Enter the Progressive era a time of social activism and political reform, an era aimed at finding a cure for industrialization and urbanization nationally. There were also societal issues that needed to be resolved, issues of governmental corruption, government machines and their overseers, women’s suffrage, child labor laws, the practice of Eugenics, and safer food and medicine for all citizens. Although the reformers of the era were trying to create a “Great America,” the Progressive era encouraged discriminatory rules; rules which aided in the re-emergence of the KKK and lay the foundation for the Immigration Act of 1917. Policies ...


The Afro-Latino Presence In Late Colonial Spanish San Antonio, Diana González Villarreal Apr 2020

The Afro-Latino Presence In Late Colonial Spanish San Antonio, Diana González Villarreal

Methods of Historical Research: Spring 2020

San Antonio is one of the oldest cities in what is currently the state of Texas. For tens of millennia, Natives have inhabited the entirety of the Americas, and also more specifically the area that is now San Antonio because of its fertile soil and rivers; it is this geographic feature that facilitates the thriving of civilizations. As such, the European Spanish settlers and missionaries established their presence in this very area as early as 1718. Since then, the inevitable miscegenation that resulted has molded the identity of what is now San Antonio, Texas, with over 300 years of documented ...


Progressive Era Activism For Black Orphanage, Isaac L. Godoy Apr 2020

Progressive Era Activism For Black Orphanage, Isaac L. Godoy

Methods of Historical Research: Spring 2020

A group of American citizens that are historically overlooked and underserved are impoverished and homeless children. According to the United States Census Bureau as of 2017, when this group is divided by race, the number of African-American children that live in poverty is higher than others. This kind of data has only been available since 1959. Previously, the federal government did not have any involvement in assisting with any services to impoverished children came in the form of community activism. The most prominent institutions to provide care to homeless children were in the form of orphanages.


John “Mule” Miles, Joe G. Gonzales Apr 2020

John “Mule” Miles, Joe G. Gonzales

Methods of Historical Research: Spring 2020

Imagine being a 14-year-old kid doing a project for history about a topic you enjoy. My group and I decided to research the history of baseball, but more specifically, the history of the Negro League. A league that solely for Black baseball players because of segregation. We decided to reach out to San Antonio native John “Mule” Miles who played in the Negro League from 1946-1949, about a possible phone interview. One day, while in math class, my history teacher pulled my group and me out of class because Miles dropped by our school and wanted to do the interview ...


The Impact Of Marriage On African American Educators In Bexar County, 1880-1950, Jordan Lejeune Apr 2020

The Impact Of Marriage On African American Educators In Bexar County, 1880-1950, Jordan Lejeune

Methods of Historical Research: Spring 2020

As a society, we are still having discussions about whether or not women “can have it all.” We have not moved past gendered expectations for men and women. Mollie Carey Brown, Fanny Ellis Starnes, and Lady Henrietta Boyd were Black educators in the San Antonio public school system in the late nineteenth century who have incredible stories that may feel familiar to some women today. Mollie Carey Brown and Fanny Ellis Starnes both got married and ended their careers. Henrietta Boyd never got married, and remained a teacher until retirement. All three of these women had to fight gender expectations ...


The Life Of A Former Slave In Bexar County, Karina De Hoyos Apr 2020

The Life Of A Former Slave In Bexar County, Karina De Hoyos

Methods of Historical Research: Spring 2020

The Slave Narrative Collection from the WPA Federal Writers’ Project, housed at the Library of Congress, has over 2,300 first-person accounts and 500 black and white photographs of people who were born into slavery.Numerous historians have relied on these narratives to help them in their work to have a better understanding of slavery. Many people did not know how, or even where, to start their new lives, but they knew they needed to find a way to make a living, or ultimately seek work from their former masters. Despite numerous obstacles in their lives before and after the ...


G. William Bouldin, More Than A Businessman, Mario M. Gutierrez Apr 2020

G. William Bouldin, More Than A Businessman, Mario M. Gutierrez

Methods of Historical Research: Spring 2020

When the average person thinks about African American history, the two major historical subjects that possibly comes to their mind are slavery and the civil rights movement. I believe this is the case because African American history is a subject with a limited curriculum in the history classes of our public schools. Possible causes for this problem could be budget restrictions, limited amounts of time in classes, or even to ‘soften’ the reality of American history. Despite these reasons, the undeniable fact is that African American History has many unresearched areas within the subject. For instance, the historical study of ...


The History Of The Cameo Theater, Patricia M. Gutierrez Apr 2020

The History Of The Cameo Theater, Patricia M. Gutierrez

Methods of Historical Research: Spring 2020

On March 20, 2015, Pastor Doug Robins held a church service in the Cameo Theater. He remembered one of the parishioners stating, “Hey, Pastor Doug, I went to a rave and I did Ecstasy right there, and now I’m coming to church here.” From its founding in 1940, up to the present day, the Cameo Theater has been a host to a number of diverse events, everything from religious services to raves. On June 11, 1940, the Cameo Theater opened and was owned by Carl Milentz.


Protest For Douglass School, Robert M. Gutierrez Apr 2020

Protest For Douglass School, Robert M. Gutierrez

Methods of Historical Research: Spring 2020

In 1865, two months before the surrender of Robert E. Lee, the United States Congress passed an act that created The Freedmen’s Bureau. The Freedmen’s Bureau was set to establish programs designed to help the newly freed slaves. The programs aided in land, homes, and education programs opportunities.In the late 1860’s Rincon Street Public Colored School was established, and it was located on Rincon Street (today known as St. Mary’s Street) in San Antonio Texas. Between 1870 to 1915, the school underwent many changes, including multiple name changes and stages of expansion. Eventually, the school ...


Homer L. Rodgers: The Commerce Street Tailor, Robert Grey Miller Apr 2020

Homer L. Rodgers: The Commerce Street Tailor, Robert Grey Miller

Methods of Historical Research: Spring 2020

The common heroes of our time are often overlooked. Doctors and nurses get recognition for helping the sick in times of need. Farmers working in the fields grow our food. Cowboys round up the cattle to bring to market. Teachers help students learn and prosper in society. However, the bus drivers, janitors, food service industry workers, and retail shop owners are usually passed by as insignificant. Not much has been said or recorded about the ordinary workers of our society, let alone African Americans in Texas. San Antonio provides a wealth of untapped knowledge to examine the average worker and ...


San Antonio Black Aces, Edwin Ocasio-Lopez Apr 2020

San Antonio Black Aces, Edwin Ocasio-Lopez

Methods of Historical Research: Spring 2020

Baseball has been in San Antonio since the 19th century, with the San Antonio Bronchos being the first team in any sport to bring the city a title in 1897. African Americans have been playing baseball for as long as there has been a sport of baseball. In 1908, the city’s first black baseball team, the Black Bronchos, won another championship for the city. After the foundation was laid for African American baseball leagues by the Black Bronchos, the Black Aces made their first and only appearance in San Antonio in 1919. Through immense struggles and pressures due to ...


Neighborhood Change Within New Jersey: The Evolutionary History That Led To The New Newark, David Medina Apr 2020

Neighborhood Change Within New Jersey: The Evolutionary History That Led To The New Newark, David Medina

Student Publications

As Newark lies 10 miles west of Manhattan, there is an increased encroachment from investors and gentrifies as surrounding cities such as Hoboken and Jersey City become too expensive and overcrowded. Known as the “Brick City”, Newark has history dating back to 1666. Leading up to World War II Newark was thriving, until an increase in suburban development and white flight that altered the race demographic. After years of racial stigma, the history of Newark is at risk as gentrification and neighborhood change looms over the city and its 282,862 residents, many of which are minorities.


Buckberry, Ray B., Jr., B. 1934 - Collector (Mss 685), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Feb 2020

Buckberry, Ray B., Jr., B. 1934 - Collector (Mss 685), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Collection 685. Research material collected by Ray B. Buckberry, Jr. related to Ernest Hogan, an African American musician from Bowling Green, Kentucky, who is sometimes credited as one of the pioneers of ragtime music. He composed and wrote lyrics for numerous musical pieces for minstrel shows and published sheet music.


Aa Ms 01 Gerald E. Talbot Collection Finding Aid, David Andreasen, Kristin D. Morris, Karin A. France, Marieke Van Der Steenhoven, Caroline Remley, Andrea Harkins, Kara Kralik, Anya O'Meara Feb 2020

Aa Ms 01 Gerald E. Talbot Collection Finding Aid, David Andreasen, Kristin D. Morris, Karin A. France, Marieke Van Der Steenhoven, Caroline Remley, Andrea Harkins, Kara Kralik, Anya O'Meara

Search the Manuscript Collection (Finding Aids)

Description:

Gerald E. Talbot was the first African American to be elected to the Maine State Legislature. He served in the Maine House of Representatives from 1972 to 1978, and worked with the Maine chapter of the NAACP and the State Board of Education. He also took part in the struggle for civil rights in other parts of the country, as well as in Maine. The Collection includes Talbot’s personal papers, records of his term in the Maine House of Representatives, of his work with the NAACP in Maine and with the State Board of Education. The Collection contains ...


0859: Mr. And Mrs. Paul R. Cooley Sr. Civil Rights Era Newspaper Collection, Marshall University Special Collections Jan 2020

0859: Mr. And Mrs. Paul R. Cooley Sr. Civil Rights Era Newspaper Collection, Marshall University Special Collections

Guides to Manuscript Collections

This collection contains six newspapers from West Virginia, Virginia, and New York documenting historic events that occurred during the Civil Rights Movement, specifically during the March on Washington on August 29, 1963 and the events that occurred after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on April 4, 1968.


Generative Leadership And The Life Of Aurelia Erskine Brazeal, A Trailblazing African American Female Foreign Service Officer, Atim Eneida George Jan 2020

Generative Leadership And The Life Of Aurelia Erskine Brazeal, A Trailblazing African American Female Foreign Service Officer, Atim Eneida George

Dissertations & Theses

There is a gap in the literature on generativity and the leadership philosophy and praxis of African American Female Foreign Service Officers (AAFFSOs). I addressed this deficit, in part, by engaging an individual of exceptional merit and distinction—Aurelia Erskine Brazeal—as an exemplar of AAFFSOs. Using qualitative research methods of portraiture and oral history, supplemented by collage, mind mapping and word clouds, this study examined Brazeal’s formative years in the segregated South and the extraordinary steps her parents took to protect her from the toxic effects of racism and legal segregation. In addition, I explored the development of ...


Freedom Triumphant: Embracing Joyful Freedom But Facing An Uncertain, Perilous Future, Thomas L. Tacker Nov 2019

Freedom Triumphant: Embracing Joyful Freedom But Facing An Uncertain, Perilous Future, Thomas L. Tacker

Publications

The newly freed slaves had almost nothing—no money, no education, and no strong social institutions, including marriage which had often been prohibited, rarely supported by slaveholders. Discrimination was rampant and government was often the worst discriminator. Yet, somehow, they triumphed. They built marriages that were actually slightly more stable than those of white families. The newly free went from virtually zero literacy to at least 50% literacy in a generation. They worked incredibly hard and increased their income about one third faster than white workers. The newly free, anchored in their strong faith, were amazingly forgiving and optimistic. Economics ...


Atwood, Rufus Ballard, 1897-1963 (Sc 3397), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Apr 2019

Atwood, Rufus Ballard, 1897-1963 (Sc 3397), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 3397. Curriculum vitae of Rufus B. Atwood, who became president of Kentucky State University, Frankfort, Kentucky in 1929. The document lists his educational credentials, achievements as KSU president, organizational affiliations, and published and unpublished work.


Moxley, Frank Otha, 1908-2004 (Mss 664), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Apr 2019

Moxley, Frank Otha, 1908-2004 (Mss 664), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Collection 664. Personal and professional papers of Dr. Frank O. Moxley of Bowling Green, Kentucky, an educator, guidance counselor, coach, and prominent member of the city’s African American community. Includes projects and narratives related to Bowling Green’s African American heritage.


Pearson, Carolyn (Sc 3377), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Apr 2019

Pearson, Carolyn (Sc 3377), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 3377. “Shadow of a Rope,” a paper by WKU student Carolyn Pearson about the arrest and trial for rape of an African American man, Sam Jennings, and his 1932 execution, the last public hanging in Breckinridge County and the second-last in Kentucky. Pearson interviewed citizens connected with the case and included five photographs of Jennings on the scaffold.


Interview Of Margaret Mcguinness, Ph.D., Margaret Mcguinness Ph.D., Stephen Pierce Apr 2019

Interview Of Margaret Mcguinness, Ph.D., Margaret Mcguinness Ph.D., Stephen Pierce

All Oral Histories

Dr. Margaret McGuinness was born in 1953, in Providence, Rhode Island. She went to an all-girls Catholic high school called St. Mary’s Academy Bayview in Providence where she graduated in 1971. McGuinness went on to major in American Studies and Civilization as an undergraduate at Boston University graduating with a B.A in 1975. She continued her work at Boston University where McGuinness earned a master’s of theological studies (M.T.S) focusing on Biblical and Historical Studies in 1979. She would move to New York to work on her dissertation at Union Theological Seminary finishing with her ...


Leaving A Little Heaven Behind With Coltrane, Or: The Performance Is The Archive, Ismael Santos Mar 2019

Leaving A Little Heaven Behind With Coltrane, Or: The Performance Is The Archive, Ismael Santos

FIU Electronic Theses and Dissertations

This thesis examines what an Audience-Centered Archive could look like, and the advantages of opening up the spaces of archival scholarship in connection with studies focused on Jazz. This thesis will explore how inherently self-limiting are traditional structures of the Archive, with the contradictory nature of Jazz Archives brought to the forefront: to archive a music like Jazz necessarily entails losing what makes it so special, losing the improvisational facet of Jazz. This thesis draws from sound studies and performance studies, along with a focus on the recording technologies that entail differences in interpretation and American history. This focus of ...