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Full-Text Articles in African American Studies

Manumissions Database, Charleston District, South Carolina (1776-1800), John Marks Jun 2018

Manumissions Database, Charleston District, South Carolina (1776-1800), John Marks

The Magazine of Early American Datasets (MEAD)

This database contains all of the manumissions filed in Charleston District from 1776-1800 contained in the Miscellaneous Records section of the South Carolina Department of Archives and History. After 1800, South Carolina changed its manumission laws (requiring court approval for manumission), causing the paperwork associated with them to be filed elsewhere (likely with the no longer extent records of the court of magistrates and freeholders.

For more information, see John Garrison Marks, "Race and Freedom in the African Americas: Free People of Color and Social Mobility in Cartagena and Charleston," PhD Dissertation (2016, Rice University).


Swamp Blues: Race And Vinyl From Southwest Louisiana, Evelyn Levingston Malone Jan 2016

Swamp Blues: Race And Vinyl From Southwest Louisiana, Evelyn Levingston Malone

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

The swamp blues have lain in the margins of music history despite foundational, if brief, contributions to 1960s popular music broadly and British blues-rock specifically. The canon is not stylistically unified, but organized around a musical sodality from the independent record industry of Southwest Louisiana between 1954-1966. Why has this regional music been forgotten, and why are the few traces of its history all overseas? Through an investigation of the postwar industrial and economic forces that reshaped the South Louisiana cultural territory into a Southeast-Texas-and-Southwest-Louisiana musical byway, this dissertation reveals how migrations of African-American workers and a “Crawfish Circuit” of ...


Empire Unbound - Imperial Citizenship, Race And Diaspora In The Making Of South Africa, Khwezi Mkhize Jan 2015

Empire Unbound - Imperial Citizenship, Race And Diaspora In The Making Of South Africa, Khwezi Mkhize

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

"Empire Unbound" is an exploration of the history and politics of empire and imperial citizenship that went into the making of South Africa before the Second World War. The making of racial difference in South Africa is often located in the temporal and political terrain that is Apartheid (1948-1994). In this dissertation I look to the history of South Africa in the long nineteenth century and recuperate the frameworks of empire and imperial citizenship in making sense of struggles for belonging. Empire, both as a form of government and imaginary, invokes a degree of scale that exceeds the nation-state. It ...


Black Semiosis: Young Liberian Transnationals Mediating Black Subjectivity And Black Heterogeneity, Krystal A. Smalls Jan 2015

Black Semiosis: Young Liberian Transnationals Mediating Black Subjectivity And Black Heterogeneity, Krystal A. Smalls

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

From the colonization of the “Dark Continent,” to the global industry that turned black bodies into chattel, to the total absence of modern Africa from most American public school curricula, to superfluous representations of African primitivity in mainstream media, to the unflinching state-sanctioned murders of unarmed black people in the Americas, antiblackness and anti-black racism have been part and parcel to modernity, swathing centuries and continents, and seeping into the tiny spaces and moments that constitute social reality for most black-identified human beings. The daily living and theorizing of a small group of twenty-something young people from Liberia provide the ...


The Mobocratic City: Race, Space And Citizenship In Nineteenth Century Philadelphia, Andrew Crocco Jan 2013

The Mobocratic City: Race, Space And Citizenship In Nineteenth Century Philadelphia, Andrew Crocco

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

This dissertation focuses on publics and the public sphere to argue that communication theory should investigate connections across discourse, space, and practice in the creation and maintenance of publics. I chose antebellum Philadelphia as my test case for two reasons. First, theorists such as Jurgen Habermas have identified the antebellum period as the time when the public sphere ceased to be maintained through face-to-face relations and became connected by means of the news media. Second, tremendous social and political conflict also characterized this period when categories considered by communications theory to be discursively constructed, such as "race" and "nation," were ...


Who Stole The Soul: Black Student Sociopolitical Solidarity In The Twenty-First Century, Brian F. Peterson Jan 2013

Who Stole The Soul: Black Student Sociopolitical Solidarity In The Twenty-First Century, Brian F. Peterson

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

The 1960s and `70s marked the most historic transformational period of Black college student enrollments and sociopolitical presence at predominantly White institutions in the United States. Research on Black student solidarity and social movements typically refers back to this era, with very little attention given to the ways that today's Black college students - the beneficiaries of the previous Black campus activist efforts - continue this work. This study explores contemporary Black student sociopolitical solidarity and the role that the institution plays in shaping it.

The following questions guided this study: How has Black students' sense of activism evolved from the ...


Raising Race Questions: Whiteness, Education And Inquiry In Seven Teacher Case Studies, Ali Michael Jan 2012

Raising Race Questions: Whiteness, Education And Inquiry In Seven Teacher Case Studies, Ali Michael

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

Race matters in schools. In addition to the highly publicized racialized achievement gap, race has historically determined who can access education and what kind of education people receive. Additionally, teachers and students bring racial identities to school that impact how they relate to one another, to the school community and to the curriculum. Finally, schools are places where race gets constructed. This study uses qualitative and action research methods to do research with teachers—rather than on teachers—as they learn about how and why race matters in education—and what that means for their classrooms. Because 85% of the ...