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Full-Text Articles in African American Studies

Becoming Owners: African American Property Ownership, Berean Building And Loan, And The City Of Philadelphia, 1890 To 1920, Ricardo Orlando Howell Jan 2017

Becoming Owners: African American Property Ownership, Berean Building And Loan, And The City Of Philadelphia, 1890 To 1920, Ricardo Orlando Howell

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

This dissertation traces the contours of African American property ownership in in the city, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. How did a moment of political deterioration during the 1890s foster African-American movements for civic accountability and political mobilization in the Quaker City? This study connects material achievement and the pursuit of property ownership among African Americans to the growth of church-based, minister-led, and property-focused associations. Historians have not often considered the connection between ostensibly moral-missioned institutions, the property they and their communities owned, and later political expressions. By raising and contextualizing a heretofore unexamined set of nearly ...


Policing, Race, And Politics In Chicago, Peter Constantine Pihos Jan 2015

Policing, Race, And Politics In Chicago, Peter Constantine Pihos

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

Policing, Race, and Politics in Chicago asks how local political institutions structured the relationship between race and policing in Chicago. It follows Renault Robinson, the Afro-American Patrolmen’s League, and their allies, as they challenged both a political order in which black politicians and voters played critical roles and a Police Department that had the most black officers of any in the United States by the early 1960s. Their activism impelled recognition that Richard J. Daley’s Democratic Party and city government simultaneously incorporated and subordinated black urbanites. Daley’s political monopoly forced the League to seek leverage outside of ...


Philadelphia Census Of Almshouse 1807-1810, Billy G. Smith Aug 2014

Philadelphia Census Of Almshouse 1807-1810, Billy G. Smith

The Magazine of Early American Datasets (MEAD)

This data is created from the census of the Philadelphia Almshouse from 1807 to 1810. The census is from the Philadelphia City Archives, Guardians of the Poor. We used microfilm loaned to us from the Mormon Library in SLC, Film 956,463.


"We Are The Revolutionaries": Visibility, Protest, And Racial Formation In 1970s Prison Radicalism, Dan Berger Dec 2010

"We Are The Revolutionaries": Visibility, Protest, And Racial Formation In 1970s Prison Radicalism, Dan Berger

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

This dissertation analyzes black and Puerto Rican prison protest in the 1970s. I argue that prisoners elucidated a nationalist philosophy of racial formation that saw racism as a site of confinement but racial identity as a vehicle for emancipation. Trying to force the country to see its sites of punishment as discriminatory locations of repression, prisoners used spectacular confrontation to dramatize their conditions of confinement as epitomizing American inequality. I investigate this radicalism as an effort to secure visibility, understood here as a metric of collective consciousness. In documenting the ways prisoners were symbols and spokespeople of 1970s racial protest ...


Art Fronts: Visual Culture And Race Politics In The Mid-Twentieth-Century United States, Erin P. Cohn May 2010

Art Fronts: Visual Culture And Race Politics In The Mid-Twentieth-Century United States, Erin P. Cohn

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

ART FRONTS: VISUAL CULTURE AND RACE POLITICS IN THE MID-TWENTIETH-CENTURY UNITED STATES Erin Park Cohn Supervisor: Kathy Peiss Art Fronts argues that visual culture played a central and understudied role in the African American freedom struggle in the middle part of the twentieth century. In particular, it traces the political lives and cultural productions of a generation of visual artists, both black and white, who seized on the Depression-era ethos of art as a weapon to forge a particular form of visual activism that agitated for social, political, and economic equality for African Americans. Participating in the proliferation of visual ...


Toni Morrison: The Struggle To Depict The Black Figure On The White Page, Timothy B. Powell Jan 1990

Toni Morrison: The Struggle To Depict The Black Figure On The White Page, Timothy B. Powell

Departmental Papers (Religious Studies)

This problem of how to represent the black self on the white page, how to overcome the inherent ethnocentrism of the Western literary tradition, is one with which both the critic and the novelist of Afro-American literature must struggle to come to terms. As Gates points out, it is a tradition which dates all the way back to Plato's metaphor of the soul -of a white horse which is described as a "follower of true glory" and another, "of a dark color," which in turn attempts to lead the soul "to do terrible and unlawful deeds." For those who ...