Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in African American Studies

Touching Paranoia: A Black Feminist Autoethnography On Race, Desire, And Erotic Massage, Jasmine Salters Jan 2016

Touching Paranoia: A Black Feminist Autoethnography On Race, Desire, And Erotic Massage, Jasmine Salters

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

Despite declarations of a “post-race” America, race and racism continue to pervade all aspects of American life and society—from our laws and language to our daily interactions and erotic desires. Drawing on five years of ethnographic research at a Black-owned adult massage studio in Los Angeles County, California, Touching Paranoia focuses on the experiences of erotic masseuses of color (Black, Latina, Filipina, and mixed-race) to examine the ways race and racism infiltrate our intimate encounters and fantasies, and how women of color—who exist at the intersection of race, gender, class, and the economy—navigate and negotiate prejudice in ...


The Mobocratic City: Race, Space And Citizenship In Nineteenth Century Philadelphia, Andrew Crocco Jan 2013

The Mobocratic City: Race, Space And Citizenship In Nineteenth Century Philadelphia, Andrew Crocco

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

This dissertation focuses on publics and the public sphere to argue that communication theory should investigate connections across discourse, space, and practice in the creation and maintenance of publics. I chose antebellum Philadelphia as my test case for two reasons. First, theorists such as Jurgen Habermas have identified the antebellum period as the time when the public sphere ceased to be maintained through face-to-face relations and became connected by means of the news media. Second, tremendous social and political conflict also characterized this period when categories considered by communications theory to be discursively constructed, such as "race" and "nation," were ...


"We Are The Revolutionaries": Visibility, Protest, And Racial Formation In 1970s Prison Radicalism, Dan Berger Dec 2010

"We Are The Revolutionaries": Visibility, Protest, And Racial Formation In 1970s Prison Radicalism, Dan Berger

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

This dissertation analyzes black and Puerto Rican prison protest in the 1970s. I argue that prisoners elucidated a nationalist philosophy of racial formation that saw racism as a site of confinement but racial identity as a vehicle for emancipation. Trying to force the country to see its sites of punishment as discriminatory locations of repression, prisoners used spectacular confrontation to dramatize their conditions of confinement as epitomizing American inequality. I investigate this radicalism as an effort to secure visibility, understood here as a metric of collective consciousness. In documenting the ways prisoners were symbols and spokespeople of 1970s racial protest ...