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Full-Text Articles in African American Studies

Change The Name! A Critical Case Study Analysis Of The September 29th Movement, L. Wesley Harris Jr., Alade S. Mcken, Nancy Camarillo Mar 2017

Change The Name! A Critical Case Study Analysis Of The September 29th Movement, L. Wesley Harris Jr., Alade S. Mcken, Nancy Camarillo

Iowa State Conference on Race and Ethnicity (ISCORE)

Though many in the Iowa State University community celebrated the renaming of Old Botany Hall to Carrie Chapman Catt Hall, a group of students pushed to reopen the naming process because of how Carrie Lane Chapman Catt aligned herself with white supremacists during her campaign to win women’s suffrage. The September 29th Movement was an intersectional, student-led initiative “dedicated to the elimination of racism, xenophobia, sexism, homophobia, and classism at Iowa State University, recognizing that changing the name of Catt Hall, a symbol of exclusion, must be the first step in that struggle.” The group took its name from ...


Black Lives Through The Lens: A Discussion On How The Media Portrays African Americans, Carmen Ballagan, Paul Parisot, Rachel Trainum, Susan Cruz-Rodriguez Mar 2016

Black Lives Through The Lens: A Discussion On How The Media Portrays African Americans, Carmen Ballagan, Paul Parisot, Rachel Trainum, Susan Cruz-Rodriguez

Iowa State Conference on Race and Ethnicity (ISCORE)

Since the start of the Black Lives Matter movement there has been a rise in media coverage of African Americans. We will provide an overview of the disturbing trends that have surfaced in how the media continues to portray black lives. We will begin by looking at the history of African Americans in the media and then answer the question, where are we now? This presentation will discuss the ways in which African Americans are represented in both news and popular media. We will then explore how these media representations affect African American’s views of self and negatively impact ...


The Effects Of General Social Support And Social Support For Racial Discrimination On African American Women’S Well-Being, Asani H. Seawell, Carolyn E. Cutrona, Daniel W. Russell Feb 2014

The Effects Of General Social Support And Social Support For Racial Discrimination On African American Women’S Well-Being, Asani H. Seawell, Carolyn E. Cutrona, Daniel W. Russell

Human Development and Family Studies Publications

The present longitudinal study examined the role of general and tailored social support in mitigating the deleterious impact of racial discrimination on depressive symptoms and optimism in a large sample of African American women. Participants were 590 African American women who completed measures assessing racial discrimination, general social support, tailored social support for racial discrimination, depressive symptoms, and optimism at two time points (2001-2002 and 2003-2004). Our results indicated that higher levels of general and tailored social support predicted optimism 1 year later; changes in both types of support also predicted changes in optimism over time. Although initial levels of ...


The Enduring Significance Of Racism: Discrimination And Delinquency Among Black American Youth, Monica J. Martin, Bill Mccarthy, Rand D. Conger, Frederick X. Gibbons, Ronald L. Simons, Carolyn E. Cutrona, Gene H. Brody Sep 2011

The Enduring Significance Of Racism: Discrimination And Delinquency Among Black American Youth, Monica J. Martin, Bill Mccarthy, Rand D. Conger, Frederick X. Gibbons, Ronald L. Simons, Carolyn E. Cutrona, Gene H. Brody

Psychology Publications

Prominent explanations of the overrepresentation of Black Americans in criminal justice statistics focus on the effects of neighborhood concentrated disadvantage, racial isolation, and social disorganization. We suggest that perceived personal discrimination is an important but frequently neglected complement to these factors. We test this hypothesis with longitudinal data on involvement in general and violent juvenile delinquency in a sample of Black youth from a variety of communities in 2 states. We examine the direct effects of concentrated disadvantage and racial isolation and the direct and mediating effects of social organization, support for violence, and personal discrimination. Consistent with our hypothesis ...


Who's Your Mammy?: Figuring And Refiguring Aunt Jemima, Harrison W. Inefuku May 2007

Who's Your Mammy?: Figuring And Refiguring Aunt Jemima, Harrison W. Inefuku

Harrison W. Inefuku

In existence since the late 1890s, advertising icon Aunt Jemima has been indelibly etched into the American memory—virtually unchanged from her debut until her makeover in 1989. Before this recent transformation, Aunt Jemima was the quintessential embodiment of the mammy stereotype—a heavyset black woman, complete with apron and bandana. Her creation was situated at the locus of several racist traditions and discourses directed towards African Americans—the mammy stereotype, the minstrel show, The Myth of the Old South, and the Exhibition of the Other. This embodiment of multiple racist practices helps to explain how the mammy in general ...


Neighborhood Context And Financial Strain As Predictors Of Marital Interaction And Marital Quality In African American Couples, Carolyn E. Cutrona, Daniel W. Russell, W. Todd Abraham, Kelly A. Gardner, Janet N. Melby, Chalandra Bryant, Rand D. Conger Sep 2003

Neighborhood Context And Financial Strain As Predictors Of Marital Interaction And Marital Quality In African American Couples, Carolyn E. Cutrona, Daniel W. Russell, W. Todd Abraham, Kelly A. Gardner, Janet N. Melby, Chalandra Bryant, Rand D. Conger

Human Development and Family Studies Publications

Demographic characteristics, family financial strain, neighborhood–level economic disadvantage, and state of residence were tested as predictors of observed warmth, hostility, and self–reported marital quality. Participants were 202 married African American couples who resided in a range of neighborhood contexts. Neighborhood–level economic disadvantage predicted lower warmth during marital interactions, as did residence in the rural south. Consistent with the family stress model (e.g., Conger & Elder, 1994), family financial strain predicted lower perceived marital quality. Unexpectedly, neighborhood–level economic disadvantage predicted higher marital quality. Social comparison processes and degree of exposure to racially based discrimination are considered as ...