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History of Art, Architecture, and Archaeology

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

Articles 1 - 10 of 10

Full-Text Articles in African American Studies

An Enslaved Landscape: The Virginia Plantation At The End Of The Seventeenth Century, David Arthur Brown Jan 2014

An Enslaved Landscape: The Virginia Plantation At The End Of The Seventeenth Century, David Arthur Brown

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

Lewis Burwell II designed Fairfield plantation in Gloucester County to be the most sophisticated and successful architectural and agricultural effort in late seventeenth-century Virginia. He envisioned a physical framework with the intent to control the world around him so that he might profit from growing tobacco, while raising his family's status to the highest in the colony through the display of wealth and knowledge and the enslavement of both Africans and the natural surroundings. The landscape he envisioned contrasted with those of the enslaved Africans he purchased and put to work in the fields and buildings surrounding his '1694 ...


Dooley's Ferry: The Archaeology Of A Civilian Community In Wartime, Carl Gilbert Drexler Jan 2013

Dooley's Ferry: The Archaeology Of A Civilian Community In Wartime, Carl Gilbert Drexler

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

Warfare and conflict are familiar topics to anthropologists, but it is only recently that anthropological archaeologists moved to create a discrete specialization, known as Conflict Archaeology. Practitioners now actively pursue research in a number of different areas, such as battlefields, fortifications, and troop encampments. These advances throw into sharp relief areas that need greater focus. This dissertation addresses one of these shortcomings by focusing on the home front by studying Dooley's Ferry, a hamlet that once lay on the banks of the Red River, in southwest Arkansas. Before the American Civil War, it was a node in the commodity ...


Gathering Places, Cultivating Spaces: An Archaeology Of A Chesapeake Neighborhood Through Enslavement And Emancipation, 1775--1905, Jon Jason Boroughs Jan 2013

Gathering Places, Cultivating Spaces: An Archaeology Of A Chesapeake Neighborhood Through Enslavement And Emancipation, 1775--1905, Jon Jason Boroughs

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

This study is a community-level analysis of an African American plantation neighborhood grounded in archaeological excavations at the Quarterpath Site (44WB0124), an antebellum quartering complex and post-Emancipation tenant residence occupied circa 1840s-1905 in lower James City County, Virginia. It asserts that the Quarterpath domestic quarter was a gathering place, a locus of social interaction in a vibrant and long established Chesapeake plantation neighborhood complex.;By the antebellum period, as marriage "abroad," or off-plantation, became the most common form of long term social union within plantation communities, enslaved social and kin ties in the Chesapeake region were typically geographically dispersed, enjoining ...


I'M Really Just An American: The Archaeological Importance Of The Black Towns In The American West And Late-Nineteenth Century Constructions Of Blackness, Shea Aisha Winsett Jan 2012

I'M Really Just An American: The Archaeological Importance Of The Black Towns In The American West And Late-Nineteenth Century Constructions Of Blackness, Shea Aisha Winsett

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

No abstract provided.


The Diasporic World Of The Great Dismal Swamp, 1630 -1860, Daniel O. Sayers Jan 2008

The Diasporic World Of The Great Dismal Swamp, 1630 -1860, Daniel O. Sayers

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

The Great Dismal Swamp of North Carolina and Virginia stood as a remote landscape in the heart of the Tidewater throughout the historical period. Between ca. 1630 and 1860, thousands of Diasporans took advantage of the remoteness of the swamp in various ways and formed a variety of communities. Within these Diasporic communities were Native Americans, maroons, and enslaved canal company workers who joined or formed communities based on individual and specific reasons for choosing to permanently inhabit the swamp. Diasporic communities emerged on islands in the swamp and the relative locations of these landforms had significant impacts on what ...


Pay For Labor: Socioeconomic Transitions Of Freedpeople And The Archaeology Of African American Life, 1863-1930, Shannon Sheila Mahoney Jan 2004

Pay For Labor: Socioeconomic Transitions Of Freedpeople And The Archaeology Of African American Life, 1863-1930, Shannon Sheila Mahoney

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

No abstract provided.


'Post-Humously Hot': Bill Traylor's Life And Art, Colleen Doyle Worrell Jan 1994

'Post-Humously Hot': Bill Traylor's Life And Art, Colleen Doyle Worrell

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

No abstract provided.


An Archaeological Perspective On The African-American Slave Diet At Mount Vernon's House For Families, Stephen Charles Atkins Jan 1994

An Archaeological Perspective On The African-American Slave Diet At Mount Vernon's House For Families, Stephen Charles Atkins

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

No abstract provided.


Free African-American Archeology: Interpreting An Antebellum Farmstead, Robin Leigh Ryder Jan 1991

Free African-American Archeology: Interpreting An Antebellum Farmstead, Robin Leigh Ryder

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

No abstract provided.


An Introduction To Artist A B Jackson And His Portrayal Of The American Neighborhood, Cindy R. Shepard Jan 1984

An Introduction To Artist A B Jackson And His Portrayal Of The American Neighborhood, Cindy R. Shepard

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

No abstract provided.