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Full-Text Articles in Intellectual History

Philosophical & Institutional Innovations Of Kenyon Leech Butterfield And The Rhode Island Contributions To The Development Of Land Grant And Sea Grant Extension, Michael Rice, Sarina Rodrigues, Kate Venturini Sep 2014

Philosophical & Institutional Innovations Of Kenyon Leech Butterfield And The Rhode Island Contributions To The Development Of Land Grant And Sea Grant Extension, Michael Rice, Sarina Rodrigues, Kate Venturini

Michael A Rice

Land Grant Education in Rhode Island began with the awarding of 1862 Morrill Act funds to Brown University, making it Rhode Island's first Land Grant College. Continuing controversy over the next two decades mostly through Rhode Island's Grange and other farm organizations led to the formation of the Rhode Island College of Agriculture and Mechanical Arts (RICA&M; now the University of Rhode Island or URI). From the establishment of the Rhode Island Agricultural Experiment Station (RIAES) in 1888, station scientists engaged in a wide variety of Extension activities with local farmers and fishermen. The second president of ...


Interpreting, Stephanie Jo Kent May 2014

Interpreting, Stephanie Jo Kent

Doctoral Dissertations

What do community interpreting for the Deaf in western societies, conference interpreting for the European Parliament, and language brokering in international management have in common? Academic research and professional training have historically emphasized the linguistic and cognitive challenges of interpreting, neglecting or ignoring the social aspects that structure communication. All forms of interpreting are inherently social; they involve relationships among at least three people and two languages. The contexts explored here, American Sign Language/English interpreting and spoken language interpreting within the European Parliament, show that simultaneous interpreting involves attitudes, norms and values about intercultural communication that overemphasize information and ...


Printing And Protestants: An Empirical Test Of The Role Of Printing In The Reformation, Jared Rubin May 2014

Printing And Protestants: An Empirical Test Of The Role Of Printing In The Reformation, Jared Rubin

Economics Faculty Articles and Research

The causes of the Protestant Reformation have long been debated. This paper seeks to revive and econometrically test the theory that the spread of the Reformation is linked to the spread of the printing press. I test this theory by analyzing data on the spread of the press and the Reformation at the city level. An econometric analysis that instruments for omitted variable bias with a city's distance from Mainz, the birthplace of printing, suggests that cities with at least one printing press by 1500 were at minimum 29 percentage points more likely to be Protestant by 1600.