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Full-Text Articles in Intellectual History

“Scholarship Boys” In Twilight: The Memoirs Of Six Humanists In Post-Industrial Britain, D. L. Lemahieu Oct 2014

“Scholarship Boys” In Twilight: The Memoirs Of Six Humanists In Post-Industrial Britain, D. L. Lemahieu

History Faculty Publications

The memoirs of six “scholarship boys”—Richard Hoggart, Frank Kermode, Eric Hobsbawm, Harold Perkin, A. H. Halsey, and Brian Magee—reveal the deeply varied experience of academically gifted working- and lower-middle-class males in the twentieth century. The arc from social outsider to cultural prominence drew upon a commitment to humanism acquired in their youth. Scholarship boys navigated the crosscurrents of post-industrial culture in many ways but shared an unwillingness to accept uncritically the sophisticated reductions of postmodern theory and the “creative destruction” of neoliberal practice. The life writing of these figures reveals the often-concealed subjectivities behind academic success, including the ...


'Fors Clavigera', The Young Women Of Whitelands College, And The Temptations Of Social History, Christopher Bischof Sep 2014

'Fors Clavigera', The Young Women Of Whitelands College, And The Temptations Of Social History, Christopher Bischof

History Faculty Publications

On the first of May each year from the 1880s onward the young women at Whitelands teacher training college in London celebrated by throwing to the wind the timetable that normally dictated how their every moment would be spent. Instead, they adorned the college in flowers, donned in white dresses, and spent the day dancing, singing, and reading poetry. The tradition of May Day helped to poke a hole in the rather dour institutional regimen of Whitelands, which opened the way for many smaller, everyday acts that gradually reworked the ethos of the college.


Lost Fathers: Raymond Williams And The Signal Box At Pandy, D. L. Lemahieu Jan 2014

Lost Fathers: Raymond Williams And The Signal Box At Pandy, D. L. Lemahieu

History Faculty Publications

This essay explores the complex role of fathers and father figures in the life and writings of Raymond Williams. First, as Williams later acknowledged, the moving portrait of Harry Price, the father in Border Country, embodied a partial but revealing autobiographical truth. Second, what Williams later called ‘the two figures of the father’ also applied to his notion of community, the ‘social father’ that helped shape his vision of a socialist future. Third, F. R. Leavis influenced Williams and other scholarship boys as something of a ‘cultural father’ whose legacy underscored some tensions and ambiguities of Williams' chosen profession. Finally ...