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Intellectual History Commons

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Full-Text Articles in Intellectual History

Labour Historians As Labour Intellectuals: Generations And Crises, Terry Irving, Sean Scalmer Dec 1998

Labour Historians As Labour Intellectuals: Generations And Crises, Terry Irving, Sean Scalmer

Terry Irving

Over the last nine decades Australian labour historians have been engaged in a massive, ongoing, fractious, collective intellectual project. This chapter argues that labour historians should understand their role historically, as labour intellectuals, and sketches three generational moments in the history of labour history intellectuals. We conclude that labour history is a popular, collective, democratic, regional, and political form of history-writing.


Play, Death, And History In Richard Ii, Kirby Farrell Prof Dec 1998

Play, Death, And History In Richard Ii, Kirby Farrell Prof

kirby farrell

This essay uses Sx's _Richard II_ to demonstrate the increasing concern with the openness of history in Shakespeare and his culture. The structure of the play acknowledges contingency and irrational dynamics in behavior that shape historical process.


Working Toward A "Shared Authority" In The Discipline And Content Of Public Hlstory: A Case Study, Ruth E. Bryan Dec 1998

Working Toward A "Shared Authority" In The Discipline And Content Of Public Hlstory: A Case Study, Ruth E. Bryan

Ruth E. Bryan

This paper explores the meaning of “public history” using Michael Frisch’s concept of a “shared authority” (A Shared Authority, 1990) through a case study of the reviews of two edited and published oral histories, Outside the Magic Circle: The Autobiography of Virginia Foster Durr (ed. Hollinger F. Barnard, 1985) and All is Never Said: The Narrative of Odette Harper Hines (ed. Judith Rollins, 1995). The result is that although history can be produced by historians with the public and about the public, public history cannot be truly an authoritative history (making explicit connections between facts, narrative, and the purpose ...