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Full-Text Articles in Intellectual History

Rights Of Subsistence In The Twelfth And Thirteenth Century: The Case Of Abandoned Children And Servants, Scott Swanson Jan 2016

Rights Of Subsistence In The Twelfth And Thirteenth Century: The Case Of Abandoned Children And Servants, Scott Swanson

Scott Swanson

Dr. Scott Swanson's contribution to the "Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress of Medieval Canon Law : Syracuse, New York, 13-18 August 1996"


Emerging Concepts Of Jurisdiction, Property Right, And Sacramental Orders Among Dominican Thinkers From Thomas Aquinas To Herveus Natalis, 1250-1320, Scott Swanson Jan 2016

Emerging Concepts Of Jurisdiction, Property Right, And Sacramental Orders Among Dominican Thinkers From Thomas Aquinas To Herveus Natalis, 1250-1320, Scott Swanson

Scott Swanson

Doctoral Dissertation of Scott Swanson, Cornell University 1988.


The Medieval Foundations Of John Locke's Theory Of Natural Rights: Rights Of Subsistence And The Principle Of Extreme Necessity, Scott Swanson Jan 2016

The Medieval Foundations Of John Locke's Theory Of Natural Rights: Rights Of Subsistence And The Principle Of Extreme Necessity, Scott Swanson

Scott Swanson

Of all the things Locke has to say about natural rights, the principle of extreme necessity strikes people today as the strangest element of his thought. It is the single element of his natural rights theory that has been lost; most people today have never heard of it and react with disbelief when it is explained. That principle, which was nevertheless a commonplace of medieval theology and church law, states, simply enough, that a person in extreme necessity—that is, facing the prospect of certain, not necessarily instant, death—may rightfully take the property of other people to sustain his ...