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Full-Text Articles in Intellectual History

The Intellectual Origins Of Popular Catholicism: Catholic Moral Theology In The Age Of Enlightenment, Michael Printy Dec 2004

The Intellectual Origins Of Popular Catholicism: Catholic Moral Theology In The Age Of Enlightenment, Michael Printy

Michael Printy

The popular Catholic revival of the nineteenth century was preceded by an intellectual revolution that enabled the Catholic Church to overcome its traditional suspicion of popular religious practices. Central to this transformation was the elaboration of the moral-theological doctrine of equiprobabilism in response to rigorist Augustinian moral pessimism, most fruitfully by Alphonsus of Liguori (1696-1787). His moral theology would set the Church in confrontation with the Catholic Enlightenment. On account of this shift in moral theology, Catholicism was best able of the major Christian churches to preserve within its institutional fold the broad religious revival of the nineteenth century.


From Barbarism To Religion: Church History And The Enlightened Narrative In Germany, Michael Printy Dec 2004

From Barbarism To Religion: Church History And The Enlightened Narrative In Germany, Michael Printy

Michael Printy

The subject of this essay is the historical vision of the German Catholic Enlightenment as seen in the work of Michael Ignaz Schmidt, a Catholic priest and author of the eleven-volume History of the Germans (1778–1793). A proper acknowledgement of Schmidt's career helps us revise the standard account of German historicism and historical practice in the eighteenth century, and also sheds light on the place of religion in the German Enlightenment. Schmidt wrote a thoroughly modern ‘history of manners’ that was indebted both to Voltaire and to Robertson. Yet his work passed into obscurity largely because he focused ...


Martin Knutzen Philosophischer Beweis Von Der Wahrheit Der Christlichen Religion (1747), Ulrich Lehner Dec 2004

Martin Knutzen Philosophischer Beweis Von Der Wahrheit Der Christlichen Religion (1747), Ulrich Lehner

Ulrich L. Lehner

Review: This text, and the series it introduces, are of interest to Anglophone scholars on a number of grounds. Martin Knutzen (1713-51), although forgotten in Germany as well as in the west, was in his day a bright light of Ko¨nigsberg scholarship and bridged the period between the time when Halle Pietism was the dominant force in the scholarship of East Prussia and the Enlightenment of the later eighteenth century. That Immanuel Kant and Johann George Hamann (who referred to him as 'the famous Knutzen') were his pupils suggests clearly enough that he was man of substance; and the ...