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Frank W. And Lillian Spencer Collection, 1921-1987, University Libraries, Lane Library Feb 2019

Frank W. And Lillian Spencer Collection, 1921-1987, University Libraries, Lane Library

Finding Aids

The collection comprises of the papers of Frank W. Spencer Papers (1921-1979) and Lillian W. Spencer (1940-1987). The bulk of the collection is subject files arranged by Frank W. Spencer over his lifetime. The bulk of the papers range from the 1940s through the end of the 1960s.


2018 Martin Luther King, Jr. Convocation, Otterbein University Jan 2018

2018 Martin Luther King, Jr. Convocation, Otterbein University

MLK Convocations

Otterbein University honors the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. each year at an annual Martin Luther King Jr. Convocation which features a keynote speaker. This year's speaker was Samuel Gresham, Jr. and also included several speeches & performances by Otterbein Students.


Desegregating The Stands: De Facto Segregation Redrawn Through Social Interaction And Sports At The University Of Mississippi In The 1970s, Nathan Robert Smith Jan 2018

Desegregating The Stands: De Facto Segregation Redrawn Through Social Interaction And Sports At The University Of Mississippi In The 1970s, Nathan Robert Smith

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

In September of 1972, Robert “Gentle Ben” Williams became the first black football player for the University of Mississippi. This study focuses on the formal and informal forms that segregation took place on campus at the University of Mississippi during his tenure. With the introduction of Williams on the Rebels squad, all major Division I football teams achieved a level of at least token integration. An examination of the student body at the school reveals segregated spaces formed informally between white and black students on campus.

By probing the student produced newspapers the minutia of day to day life, along ...


And They Entered As Ladies: When Race, Class And Black Femininity Clashed At Central High School, Misti Nicole Harper Aug 2017

And They Entered As Ladies: When Race, Class And Black Femininity Clashed At Central High School, Misti Nicole Harper

Theses and Dissertations

“And They Entered as Ladies: When Race, Class and Black Femininity Clashed at Central High School,” explores the intersectionality of race, gender and class status as middle-class black women led the integration movement and were the focal point of white backlash during the 1957 Little Rock Central High School crisis. Six of the nine black students chosen to integrate Central High School were carefully selected girls from middle-class homes, whose mothers and female family members played active parts in keeping their daughters enrolled at Central, while Daisy Gatson Bates orchestrated the integration of the capital’s school system. Nevertheless, these ...


Playing His Own Game: Ernest 'Dutch' Morial's 1977 Mayoral Campaign For Citizen Participation In New Orleans, Eric Marshall May 2017

Playing His Own Game: Ernest 'Dutch' Morial's 1977 Mayoral Campaign For Citizen Participation In New Orleans, Eric Marshall

University of New Orleans Theses and Dissertations

Ernest “Dutch” Morial’s 1977 grassroots mayoral campaign disrupted the political status quo in New Orleans with his message of citizen participation. Morial’s citizen-driven campaign reached over the constituencies of established Black Political Organizations, capturing an eager audience with his message of political, social, and economic equality. With the help of volunteers and other community organizations, Morial created a grassroots campaign that focused on making city government more inclusive. Unattached to the traditional patronage structure, Mayor Morial empowered the black community, reducing the constraints of their political access. Although his legacy is difficult to discern in New Orleans current ...


Writings: Miscellaneous Jacksonville Women’S Network Speeches, Edna Louise Saffy Apr 2017

Writings: Miscellaneous Jacksonville Women’S Network Speeches, Edna Louise Saffy

Saffy Collection - All Textual Materials

Speeches: Jacksonville Women’s Network and its history, it includes a letter from the Tampa Athena Society, Inc. No date.


Right To Serve, Right To Lead: Lives And Legacies Of The Usct, Matthew D. Laroche, Hannah M. Christensen, Alexandria J. Andrioli, Jennifer A. Simone, Savannah G. Rose, Jonathan G. Danchik, Laurel J. Wilson, Jonathan E. Tracey, Danielle E. Jones, Ryan D. Bilger, Savannah A. Labbe Apr 2017

Right To Serve, Right To Lead: Lives And Legacies Of The Usct, Matthew D. Laroche, Hannah M. Christensen, Alexandria J. Andrioli, Jennifer A. Simone, Savannah G. Rose, Jonathan G. Danchik, Laurel J. Wilson, Jonathan E. Tracey, Danielle E. Jones, Ryan D. Bilger, Savannah A. Labbe

Civil War Institute Student Research

This is a catalog for an exhibit that follows the evolution of African-American participation in the Civil War, from slaves, to contrabands, to soldiers of the United States Colored Troops (USCT), as well as the lives of black veterans beyond the war, and their ultimate military and social legacy. Using a variety of period items, it creates a narrative that stretches from the Antebellum Period to the current day. In doing so, the exhibit shows how black sacrifice on the battlefield redefined the war's purpose throughout the divided nation, how Jim Crowe suppressed the memory of black participation after ...


Taylor Studies, Teaches The History Of Civil Rights., Aldemaro Romero Jr. Mar 2017

Taylor Studies, Teaches The History Of Civil Rights., Aldemaro Romero Jr.

Publications and Research

For many, the era of the Civil Rights Movement belongs to the past, a time vaguely associated with hippies and protesters. However, in the last few months, we have seen both new and old grievances surfacing, whether regarding immigrants, women, ethnic minorities, or members of the LGBTQ group.

As the Spanish philosopher and Harvard professor Jorge Santayana once said, “Those who ignore the past are doomed to repeat it.” Therefore, it’s important to look at past struggles and ask ourselves whether there’s anything we can learn from them.


2017 Martin Luther King Jr. Convocation, Otterbein University Jan 2017

2017 Martin Luther King Jr. Convocation, Otterbein University

MLK Convocations

Otterbein University honors the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. each year at an annual Martin Luther King Jr. Convocation which features a keynote speaker. This year's speakers included several speeches & performances by Otterbein Students.


Racial Injustice In Houston, Texas: The Mexican American Mobilization Against The Police Killing Of Joe Campos Torres, Melanie Rodriguez Rodriguez Jan 2017

Racial Injustice In Houston, Texas: The Mexican American Mobilization Against The Police Killing Of Joe Campos Torres, Melanie Rodriguez Rodriguez

Open Access Theses & Dissertations

This study examines the Houston Police Departmentâ??s (the HPD) relations with the ethnic-Mexican community across four decades to consider how the police killing of Joe Campos Torres sparked a wave of protest that ensured that cityâ??s long history of police brutality against ethnic Mexicans and other minorities (especially African Americans) came to the forefront in Texas, if not the nation in general. The HPD was a mechanisms of the cityâ??s status quo that reinforced the racial dominance of white Houstonians. From 1940 to 1970, the HPD found it necessary to implement effective police models to control wayward ...


From Hackensack To The White House: The Triumph And Travail Of E. Frederic Morrow, Michael J. Birkner Jan 2017

From Hackensack To The White House: The Triumph And Travail Of E. Frederic Morrow, Michael J. Birkner

History Faculty Publications

Four decades after arranging a historic meeting in the White House of President Dwight D. Eisenhower and African-American leaders on June 23, 1958 former Eisenhower assistant Rocco Siciliano recounted the back-story of the meeting, highlighting its inherent drama and significance. In the course of sharing his recollections Siciliano paid tribute to an African-American member of the White House staff, E. Frederic Morrow, calling him a “true pioneer in the American black civil rights movement.” Added Siciliano: “[Morrow’s] impact on civil rights progress has yet to be appreciated.” Judging “impact” by one individual on a large-scale movement is tricky business ...


0839: Mildred Mitchell-Bateman Papers, 1941-2006, Marshall University Special Collections Jan 2017

0839: Mildred Mitchell-Bateman Papers, 1941-2006, Marshall University Special Collections

Guides to Manuscript Collections

This collection contains the personal, educational, and professional possessions of Mildred Mitchell-Bateman. The collection includes correspondence, newspaper articles, association newsletters, professional planners, financial documents, plaques, and other personal memorabilia. The materials document Bateman’s various roles within local, state, and national psychology and psychiatric organizations. The collection is organized into six series: Series 1, Personal; Series 2, Education; Series 3, Professional Experience; Series 4, Correspondence; Series 5, Associations; and Series 6, Bound Books, Bound Volumes and list of Newspapers.


Gettysburg Historical Journal 2017 Jan 2017

Gettysburg Historical Journal 2017

The Gettysburg Historical Journal

No abstract provided.


A Divided Front: Military Dissent During The Vietnam War, Kaylyn L. Sawyer Jan 2017

A Divided Front: Military Dissent During The Vietnam War, Kaylyn L. Sawyer

The Gettysburg Historical Journal

Emerging from a triumphant victory in World War Two, American patriotism surged in the 1950s. Positive images in theater and literature of America’s potential to bring peace and prosperity to a grateful Asia fueled the notion that the United States could be the “good Samaritan of the entire world.”[1] This idea prevailed through the mid-1960s as three-quarters of Americans indicated they trusted their government. That positive feeling would not last, and America’s belief in its own exceptionalism would begin to shatter with “the major military escalation in Vietnam and the shocking revelations it brought.”[2] The turmoil ...


Negotiating The Delta: Dr. T.R.M. Howard In Mound Bayou, Mississippi, William Jackson Southerland Oct 2016

Negotiating The Delta: Dr. T.R.M. Howard In Mound Bayou, Mississippi, William Jackson Southerland

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

This paper examines the racially segregationist practices and the integrationist, inclusionist formation of African American leader Dr. T.R.M. Howard during his tenure as a surgeon and entrepreneur in the all-black Mississippi Delta community of Mound Bayou, 1942-1956. The paper analytically investigates the careful racial negotiations that were required of Howard as he advanced a separatist but egalitarian economic and social plan for Delta blacks. This separatist plan, it is argued, is grounded in the racial pragmatism of the Seventh-day Adventist church which provided a bibliocentric, Tuskegee-inspired education to Howard from youth through medical school and beyond. Howard’s ...


For All The World To See: Visual Culture And The Struggle For Civil Rights Program Booklet, Booth Library Oct 2016

For All The World To See: Visual Culture And The Struggle For Civil Rights Program Booklet, Booth Library

For All the World to See: Program Booklet

No abstract provided.


For All The World To See: Visual Culture And The Struggle For Civil Rights, Booth Library Oct 2016

For All The World To See: Visual Culture And The Struggle For Civil Rights, Booth Library

Booth Library Programs

Photo galleries and supporting exhibits can be found on the FOR ALL THE WORLD TO SEE: VISUAL CULTURE AND THE STRUGGLE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS exhibit page.

Exhibit Dates

This exhibit was displayed at Booth Library September 1 - October 20, 2016


Trailblazer: The Legacy Of Bishop Henry M. Turner During The Civil War, Reconstruction, And Jim Crowism, Jordan Alexander Jun 2016

Trailblazer: The Legacy Of Bishop Henry M. Turner During The Civil War, Reconstruction, And Jim Crowism, Jordan Alexander

Masters Theses

Henry McNeal Turner (1834–1915), a black wartime chaplain, an African Methodist Episcopal (AME) pastor, and occasional Republican politician, was a beacon of hope for thousands of freedmen following the American Civil War. The late nineteenth century marked a watershed in civil rights in the United States. The Civil War (1861–1865) ushered in emancipation for black slaves, while Reconstruction (1865–1877) provided tremendous opportunities for freedmen, including black male suffrage, equal protection under the law, and election to public office. Of course, African–Americans faced serious challenges. Many white southerners resisted Reconstruction, and the Ku Klux Klan (and other ...


Complicating The Narrative: Labor, Feminism, And Civil Rights In The United Teachers Of New Orleans Strike Of 1990, Emma Long May 2016

Complicating The Narrative: Labor, Feminism, And Civil Rights In The United Teachers Of New Orleans Strike Of 1990, Emma Long

University of New Orleans Theses and Dissertations

In 1990, over 3,000 of 4,500 New Orleans public school teachers refused to enter their classrooms over a contract dispute with their employer, the Orleans Parish School Board. For three weeks, teachers picketed while the negotiating team for their union, The United Teachers of New Orleans, worked to reach a contract agreement. Using interviews with striking teachers and union leaders, this paper aims to tell this story from their perspective. The interviews shed light on the ways that minorities and women used UTNO, with the incorporated ideologies and strategies of civil rights and feminism, as a platform to ...


“The Ground You Walk On Belongs To My People": Lakota Community Building, Activism, And Red Power In Western Nebraska, 1917-2000, David Christensen May 2016

“The Ground You Walk On Belongs To My People": Lakota Community Building, Activism, And Red Power In Western Nebraska, 1917-2000, David Christensen

UNLV Theses, Dissertations, Professional Papers, and Capstones

Framed by histories of Lakotas in the twentieth century, American Indian Activism, and the “long civil rights movement,” this dissertation seeks to provide new perspectives on the American Indian civil rights movement. Although the United States government removed Lakotas from western Nebraska in the late nineteenth century, some returned to a portion of their homeland, settling and working in the border town of Gordon and the region’s two largest towns, Alliance and Scottsbluff, in the twentieth century. Between 1917 and 2000, Lakotas living in off reservation communities in western Nebraska created a grassroots reform movement, whose goals differed from ...


2016 Mlk Convocation, Sarah L. Hickey Jan 2016

2016 Mlk Convocation, Sarah L. Hickey

MLK Convocations

This is the program for the annual MLK Convocation at Otterbein University.


Arnold Michael Shankman Papers - Accession 259, Arnold Michael Shankman Jan 2016

Arnold Michael Shankman Papers - Accession 259, Arnold Michael Shankman

Manuscript Collection

The Arnold Shankman Papers are a treasure trove of historical research in a variety of areas. Within the American Civil War era, Shankman had extensively researched the “copperhead” movement of northern opposition to the war and was an expert on one of its leading members, Clement Vallandigham. Pursuing his interest in ethnic history, Dr. Shankman was a pioneer in the study of how ethnic and immigrant groups viewed each other. For example, he was one of the first to use early African-American newspapers to determine the views of blacks toward Italian immigrants and other groups. Shankman also was singularly instrumental ...


Arnold Michael Shankman Papers - Accession 98, Arnold Michael Shankman Jan 2016

Arnold Michael Shankman Papers - Accession 98, Arnold Michael Shankman

Manuscript Collection

The Arnold Shankman Papers consist mainly of photocopies of manuscript collections which Dr. Shankman used for his research and writing. Included are pamphlets, biographical sketches, correspondence and newspaper accounts. Most of the collection relates to the American Civil War, particularly in Illinois, Georgia, and Pennsylvania, but there is material relating to Jewish history, African-Americans and United States foreign relations.


Drive Toward Freedom: African American: The Story Of Black Automobility In The Fight For Civil Rights, Xavier Macy Dec 2015

Drive Toward Freedom: African American: The Story Of Black Automobility In The Fight For Civil Rights, Xavier Macy

Masters Theses

Looking across the 20th century, this thesis seeks to understand the relationship African Americans developed between automobility and the fight for civil rights, filling a gap left in the historiography of both the automobile and the Civil Rights Movement. Historians of the automobile have almost exclusively focused their lens on white suburbia and the “autotopias” that Americans created, while historians of the Civil Rights Movement ignored the automobile entirely. This thesis hopes to begin to fill that void by explaining how African Americans exploited the technological system of the automobile to create forms of transportation accessible to African American ...


To "Plant Our Trees On American Soil, And Repose Beneath Their Shade": Africa, Colonization, And The Evolution Of A Black Identity Narrative In The United States, 1808-1861, Edward Jason Vickers Nov 2015

To "Plant Our Trees On American Soil, And Repose Beneath Their Shade": Africa, Colonization, And The Evolution Of A Black Identity Narrative In The United States, 1808-1861, Edward Jason Vickers

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

This work explores the role that ideas about Africa played in the development of a specifically American identity among free blacks in the United States, from the early nineteenth century to the Civil War. Previous studies of the writings of free blacks in the Revolutionary period, and of the American Colonization Society (ACS), which was devoted to removing them back to an African homeland, have suggested that black discussions of Africa virtually disappeared after 1816, when the colonization movement began. However, as this work illustrates, the letters, books, newspapers, and organizational records produced by free blacks in the antebellum era ...


Presentation Notes, Grady Johnson Nov 2015

Presentation Notes, Grady Johnson

Saffy Collection - All Textual Materials

Presentation notes about Edna Saffy by Grady Johnson delivered at the UNF Library Dean's Council Gratitude Reception, November 2015.


The "Unfinished Work:" The Civil War Centennial And The Civil Rights Movement, Megan A. Sutter Oct 2015

The "Unfinished Work:" The Civil War Centennial And The Civil Rights Movement, Megan A. Sutter

Student Publications

The Civil War Centennial celebrations fell short of a great opportunity in which Americans could reflect on the legacy of the Civil War through the racial crisis erupting in their nation. Different groups exploited the Centennial for their own purposes, but only the African Americans and civil rights activists tried to emphasize the importance of emancipation and slavery to the memory of the war. Southerners asserted states’ rights in resistance to what they saw as a black rebellion in their area. Northerners reflected back on the theme of reconciliation, prevalent in the seventy-fifth anniversary of the war. Unfortunately, those who ...


Eisenhower: Champion Of Federal Activism, Shirley Anne Warshaw Sep 2015

Eisenhower: Champion Of Federal Activism, Shirley Anne Warshaw

Political Science Faculty Publications

As we watch the cast of characters vying for the Republican presidential nomination in this not-so-invisible primary season, there appears to be a common thread to their conversations: keep the government out of my life and my business. But this call for out-of-my-life government is contrary to the federal activism that one of the Republican Party’s most admired presidents advocated. [excerpt]


Interview Of John Mackin, John Mackin, Alex Palma Apr 2015

Interview Of John Mackin, John Mackin, Alex Palma

All Oral Histories

John Mackin was born in 1943 in Scranton, Pennsylvania. He moved to Longbeach, New York when his father returned home from WWII. Soon after his family moved there, they moved again to Collingswood, New Jersey. Finally, his family moved to Cherry Hill, New Jersey when John was 16. John attended public and Catholic school growing up and attended Boston College for his higher education. John hit a rough page after college during which he struggled with alcoholism. At the time of the interview, he worked at the La Salle University Connelly Library. A position he got in 1984 while the ...


Lancastrians Marched With Dr. King In Selma, Michael J. Birkner Mar 2015

Lancastrians Marched With Dr. King In Selma, Michael J. Birkner

History Faculty Publications

Fifty years after he addressed a crowd in Lancaster’s Penn Square about “the idea that all men are one,” Wayne Glick remembers that moment as if it happened yesterday. Glick’s speech, inviting Lancastrians to participate in the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, on behalf of African-American voting rights, is a footnote to Lancaster County history. But the march itself, featured in the popular film “Selma,” helped to change America. [excerpt]