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Full-Text Articles in History

Beyond The Party-Group Continuum: Massachusetts Interest Groups In The 1980s, John C. Berg Sep 1991

Beyond The Party-Group Continuum: Massachusetts Interest Groups In The 1980s, John C. Berg

New England Journal of Public Policy

Studies in the 1960s determined that Massachusetts had strong parties and weak interest groups. In the 1970s and 1980s, as the Republican Party shrank, party competition declined, conflict with the Democratic Party grew, and interest groups gained more importance — and probably will remain important despite the Republican gains of 1990. However, group conflict and citizen mobilization, including increased use of the initiative and referendum, create a situation of interest-centered conflict rather than interest-group dominance as traditionally conceived. This article, based on a 1987 survey of state legislators and legislative aides, plus a summary of recent Massachusetts political history, assesses the ...


Sports Notes, Wornie L. Reed Sep 1991

Sports Notes, Wornie L. Reed

Trotter Review

In the Winter/Spring 1991 issue of the Trotter Institute Review I reported that a black dentist from Boston, Dr. George F. Grant, invented and patented the golf tee in 1899. However, in the May 1991 issue of Golf Digest, a white man, Dr. William Lowell of New Jersey, another dentist, is credited with having invented the golf tee. Having read in a number of reputable publications that Dr. Grant had invented the golf tee, I was interested in finding out how a second man could have been credited so readily with the development of the tee. So I contacted ...


The Vietnam War Memorial And The Gulf War, Paul L. Atwood Sep 1991

The Vietnam War Memorial And The Gulf War, Paul L. Atwood

New England Journal of Public Policy

This article discusses the debate over the "meaning" of the Vietnam War Memorial in Washington, D.C., relating it to the revision of the "Vietnam syndrome" as it has been played out in recent U.S. armed interventions overseas. Considerable political struggle occurred during the design phase of the memorial over which values the monument should enshrine. Since its construction the memorial has continued to be a focus for controversy about the future direction of U.S. foreign policy and has functioned as a magnet for continuing historical and political attempts to sort out the "lessons" of the second Indochina ...


Patterns Of Race Hate In The Americas Before 1800, Rhett S. Jones Jun 1991

Patterns Of Race Hate In The Americas Before 1800, Rhett S. Jones

Trotter Review

The recent growth in the study of the African diaspora reflected in a number of comparative studies calls attention to the ways in which the black experience in the United States — and the thirteen British colonies in North America that preceded its formation — differs from that of blacks elsewhere in the Americas. This paper examines the unique form of race hatred that emerged in North America and places that hatred in the cultural context of race relations in the hemisphere.


Still The Long Journey: Thoughts Concerning The State Of Afro-American History, Charles Pete T. Banner-Haley Jun 1991

Still The Long Journey: Thoughts Concerning The State Of Afro-American History, Charles Pete T. Banner-Haley

Trotter Review

Now that Afro-American history is within the mainstream of scholarly discourse, it has become important to take a serious look at the contributions that the last three decades have produced. Of course, that would take more time than I have today, but it may be useful to talk of the latest developments and what they portend for future studies in the discipline and how they have affected my own research and thinking. The areas that I would like to look at today concern the revision of the recent past, the re-emphasis of the centrality of Afro-American history, and the evolving ...


The Death Of Markus Lopius: Fact Of Fantasy? First Documented Presence Of A Black Man In Oregon, August 16, 1788, Darrell Millner Jun 1991

The Death Of Markus Lopius: Fact Of Fantasy? First Documented Presence Of A Black Man In Oregon, August 16, 1788, Darrell Millner

Trotter Review

The introduction of the American presence in the early Pacific Northwest has traditionally been portrayed as an exclusively Caucasian endeavor. But with the recent emergence of ethnic studies as a legitimate academic discipline and the development of competent scholars from diverse ethnic and racial backgrounds, the traditional perspectives on this period of exploration have been broadened and revised. One benefit of this new scholarship is the story of the first documented presence of a black man in the area known today as Oregon. Markus Lopius came to and died in Oregon in 1788.


Commentary: Characteristics Of African-American Leadership, Wornie L. Reed Jun 1991

Commentary: Characteristics Of African-American Leadership, Wornie L. Reed

Trotter Review

Discussions about the progress of African-Americans frequently involve discussions about the nature and strength of black leadership and leadership roles. Increasingly such discussions contend that with the growth and diversification of the African-American community there can be no one leader for a black America — if there ever was such a thing. Rather various individuals at different places and at different times are the leaders among African-Americans. As these arguments develop it may be useful to examine the nature of leadership in general and the historical patterns of African-American leadership in particular.