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Maine Bicentennial

Maine history

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Maine Becomes A State: The Movement To Separate Maine From Massachusetts, 1785-1820 [Appendix V], Ronald F. Banks Jan 1970

Maine Becomes A State: The Movement To Separate Maine From Massachusetts, 1785-1820 [Appendix V], Ronald F. Banks

Maine Bicentennial

Appendix V only from the volume Maine Becomes a State, containing the tabulation of votes for the six elections on separation of Maine from Massachusetts which took place between 1792 and 1819.


The Effects Of The Embargo Of 1807 On The District Of Maine, Blakely Brooks Babcock Jan 1963

The Effects Of The Embargo Of 1807 On The District Of Maine, Blakely Brooks Babcock

Maine Bicentennial

The Embargo of 1807 was passed by the United States Congress on December 22nd 1807. It marked the culmination of American attempts to deal effectively with the warring powers of Europe and to prevent their depredations on American ships and seamen. With all foreign trade cut off and coastal trade increasingly difficult, much of Maine's economic life was at a standstill for the duration of the fourteen-month embargo. The restrictive laws came at a time the District of Maine was engaged in a profitable and growing trade with ports all over the world.


The Maine Civil Officer, Or, The Powers And Duties Of Sheriffs, Coroners, Constables, And Collectors Of Taxes; With An Appendix, Containing The Necessary Forms And An Abridgment Of The Law Relative To The Duties Of Civil Officers, Jeremiah Perley Dec 1838

The Maine Civil Officer, Or, The Powers And Duties Of Sheriffs, Coroners, Constables, And Collectors Of Taxes; With An Appendix, Containing The Necessary Forms And An Abridgment Of The Law Relative To The Duties Of Civil Officers, Jeremiah Perley

Maine Bicentennial

The office of Sheriff is of the highest nature, from the importance of the trusts confided to it and the great power with which it is invested. The officer himself is supposed to possess a respectable character, corresponding to the importance of his trust and powers. All judicial processes, whether civil or criminal, must be served by him, both at their commencement and final execution; and he is the principal keeper of the peace within the county. An accurate knowledge of the laws conferring and defining these extensive powers and duties, as well as the mode prescribed for their exercise ...